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Sol581: Spirit Arrived!, ...on the summit of Husband hill
edstrick
post Aug 22 2005, 09:29 AM
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Isn't it nice that the ground right in front of the rover to the north in complex and visually interesting.. the near-ground to the east and south is much blander and less photogenic.

When we go to the south shoulder of the hill for a better view into the hollow to the south, I hope we're as lucky with a good foreground view.
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MichaelT
post Aug 22 2005, 09:36 AM
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QUOTE (malgar @ Aug 22 2005, 09:08 AM)
How many sols (and days) from West Spur has taken Spirit to reach the summit?  wheel.gif
*

If I remember it right, Spirit reached the base of Husband Hill around Sol 190. So, it took her 390 Sols = 400 Days, more than a year!

Some people here, including me, hoped for a nice DD in the background - and what did we get?! blink.gif biggrin.gif
Could it have gotten any better?

Michael
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jvandriel
post Aug 22 2005, 09:44 AM
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MichaelT,

not 1 but 2 dust devils.

You must be a lucky guy.

biggrin.gif


jvandriel
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Reckless
post Aug 22 2005, 09:55 AM
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I've just seen the view from the top brilliant. I think you can make out the three high points on the near side of Thira crater.
Well done to everyone.
And there is so much more to come on the south side biggrin.gif laugh.gif biggrin.gif ohmy.gif

Roy F
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Bob Shaw
post Aug 22 2005, 10:16 AM
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After Homeplate, I vote for a quick run over to Thira - there's some hills need climbing!

(BTW, anyone spot the *shadow* of the DD? Wow!)


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Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
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edstrick
post Aug 22 2005, 10:22 AM
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Stealing JVandriel's panorama's central half... Here's a proposed route <not including a possible jog to the south shoulder of the hill for a first overlook into the South Hollow> of a traverse to the second summit for an overlook into the Northeast Hollow. The geology there is distinctive and interesting in MOC image data and would well be worth a trip to check out if the South Hollow and Home Plate weren't even better.

So we'd better get a good look that direction.. may be very useful, even possibly essential in understanding the geologic structure and origin of the hills.
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Nix
post Aug 22 2005, 10:27 AM
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All right! we'll probably see a dozen more pans from this location but here goes.



version 1



version 2

Nice to share this joy with all of you guys!

Nico


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ustrax
post Aug 22 2005, 10:49 AM
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Nico...That is breathtaking!

edstrick, what's the idea?!
Full steam ahead to the South Basin, Ultreya and Homeplate!!!
tongue.gif


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Bob Shaw
post Aug 22 2005, 10:57 AM
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I'm intrigued by the serpentine sand/dust dunes on the edge of the plateau - presumably they indicate the historical direction of the prevailing winds. However, on Earth it's more common to see a bare and rocky summit (even on a flat top) than dunes on the apex of the hill. If the dunes are local in origin, does this mean they are very old, perhaps?


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edstrick
post Aug 22 2005, 10:58 AM
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They *CANT*... As Squyres points out.. every day is maybe the last... They're gonna do a rock survey on top of the hill to be sure they aren't different from anything so far.... they very well could be..

The view to the northeast will be as good as this one.. and very different terrain we'll almost certainly never visit.

We can get a first look over the shoulder to the south on the way over to Summit 2.... and I'd strongly prefer an east-then-south route down into the basin.. the layered looking ridges and shelfs of rock they'll pass on the route down may be very important geologically.. and it will give a far better view and approach to the "ultreya" sand sheet than an approach from the west.

The whole east route gives more interesting and more likely different geology than we've seen than a climb down the hill to the west and a loop around the south side into the southern hollow.

I agree with the goal.. I don't think the sand sheet is that important, but it's a fundamental surficial unit type we should look at, if only for future engineering knowledge.. we're gonna have to be able to cross them... My goal is home plate.. I keep thinking that thing is a playa type salt deposit in a hollow that's now partly eroded away from around it.. .... maybe...

Beyond Home plate.. if we get there....... It's either the summit of the next hill to the south, or extensive exploration of the hollow.. there's oodles of weird geology I can half see in the MOC images.... all depends on rover condition and seasonal power availibility.
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ustrax
post Aug 22 2005, 11:12 AM
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QUOTE (edstrick @ Aug 22 2005, 10:58 AM)
They *CANT*... As Squyres points out.. every day is maybe the last... They're gonna do a rock survey on top of the hill to be sure they aren't different from anything so far.... they very well could be..

The view to the northeast will be as good as this one.. and very different terrain we'll almost certainly never visit. 

We can get a first look over the shoulder to the south on the way over to Summit 2.... and I'd strongly prefer an east-then-south route down into the basin.. the layered looking ridges and shelfs of rock they'll pass on the route down  may be very important geologically.. and it will give a far better view and approach to the "ultreya" sand sheet than an approach from the west. 

The whole east route gives more interesting and more likely different geology than we've seen than a climb down the hill to the west and a loop around the south side into the southern hollow.

I agree with the goal.. I don't think the sand sheet is that important, but it's a fundamental surficial unit type we should look at, if only for future engineering knowledge.. we're gonna have to be able to cross them... My goal is home plate.. I keep thinking that thing is a playa type salt deposit in a hollow that's now partly eroded away from around it.. .... maybe...

Beyond Home plate..  if we get there....... It's either the summit of the next hill to the south, or extensive exploration of the hollow.. there's oodles of weird geology I can half see in the MOC images.... all depends on rover condition and seasonal power availibility.
*


Sorry edstrick...My english betrayed me, I thought you were suggesting ignoring COMPLETELY the south and take the east the only priority...


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MahFL
post Aug 22 2005, 11:19 AM
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Wow !, its like Spirit just landed and started a new mission. The view is breathtaking.
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edstrick
post Aug 22 2005, 11:22 AM
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<Nods at Ustrax>... No problem.

Bob Shaw: "I'm intrigued by the serpentine sand/dust dunes on the edge of the plateau - presumably they indicate the historical direction of the prevailing winds. However, on Earth it's more common to see a bare and rocky summit (even on a flat top) than dunes on the apex of the hill. If the dunes are local in origin, does this mean they are very old, perhaps? "

The serpentine dune-let? ... dune-ino?.... mini-dune?.. NANO-Dune!... <...needs to go to bed....> is essentially identical in general form to the one on the south or southeast rim of Eagle crater. Both are apparently results of prevailing wind direction and prevailing sand or whatever transport. There were some on the south rim of Bonneville, too.... Stuff is carried up the slope close to the surface and when the windflow detaches from the surface and probably becomes turbulent at the topographic break... voila... serpentine ripples.

The dark sand sheets on the northwest inside wall of Bonneville, and the ones we can see on the southeast flanks of the hill(s) to the north.. and the big "Ultreya" sand sheet on the southeast are another result of the same transport process, I suspect. I think we ought to take a quick look at the composition of the soil in these dunelets to compare with the big sheet at "ultreya".. there may be interesting physical and minerological property differences, if only due to what seems to be very complex patterns of eolian sorting of materials.
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MichaelT
post Aug 22 2005, 11:27 AM
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QUOTE (Bob Shaw @ Aug 22 2005, 10:57 AM)
I'm intrigued by the serpentine sand/dust dunes on the edge of the plateau - presumably they indicate the historical direction of the prevailing winds. However, on Earth it's more common to see a bare and rocky summit (even on a flat top) than dunes on the apex of the hill. If the dunes are local in origin, does this mean they are very old, perhaps?
*

Not necessarily. I think that these little ripples right on the edge are just what I would expect if you had up-slope winds. The quite sudden transition from the steep slope to the plateau would lead to the formation of a vortex right behind that edge, causing dust deposition right there. If you had a more rounded mountain top, the airflow would be more laminar and such ripples would not be present. On Earth you often find similar structures on snow-covered mountains.
Michael
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Tman
post Aug 22 2005, 11:49 AM
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That view is worth an extra shift! smile.gif
A bit color change again. I'm still unsatisfied about contrast and conservation of details in my pans, but the (my) clearing of the lens vignetting degrades it always.



(1,9 MB) http://www.greuti.ch/spirit/spirit_navcam_sol581.jpg


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