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James Webb Space Telescope, information, updates and discussion
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Mar 14 2006, 05:02 PM
Post #16





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To keep things tidy and prevent sprawling, disconnected threads, I moved Bruce's two posts to the JWST thread.
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GravityWaves
post Apr 1 2006, 07:27 PM
Post #17


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QUOTE (dilo @ Aug 23 2005, 06:22 PM) *
4.5 billion is a lot. If I'm not wrong, this is 2 B$ above Hubble, and still surpassing it even considering the cost of shuttle servicing missions.
How is possible? clearly, the aveniristic technology require strong investment... but consider that this will have many applications and can be an investment for future space telescopes!



Guys have you seen the JWST talking points e-mail ? I think NASA watch had it on the website
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ljk4-1
post May 16 2006, 02:44 PM
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James Webb Telescope Sunshield Membrane Passes Tests

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/James_We...sses_Tests.html

Redondo Beach CA (SPX) May 15, 2006 - Northrop Grumman announced Monday its
engineering team has successfully completed a series of tests on a key element
of the James Webb Space Telescope.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ljk4-1
post May 31 2006, 05:53 PM
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ATK To Provide More Components For James Webb Space Telescope

Minneapolis MN (SPX) May 31, 2006

Alliant Techsystems announced Tuesday it has received a $65 million contract to provide more components and subsystems to Northrop Grumman for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/ATK_To_P..._Telescope.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ljk4-1
post Jun 9 2006, 07:28 PM
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Astrophysics, abstract
astro-ph/0606175

From: Jonathan Gardner [view email]

Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2006 21:05:29 GMT (12223kb)

The James Webb Space Telescope

Authors: Jonathan P. Gardner, John C. Mather, Mark Clampin, Rene Doyon, Matthew A. Greenhouse, Heidi B. Hammel, John B. Hutchings, Peter Jakobsen, Simon J. Lilly, Knox S. Long, Jonathan I. Lunine, Mark J. McCaughrean, Matt Mountain, John Nella, George H. Rieke, Marcia J. Rieke, Hans-Walter Rix, Eric P. Smith, George Sonneborn, Massimo Stiavelli, H. S. Stockman, Rogier A. Windhorst, Gillian S. Wright

Comments: 96 pages, including 48 figures and 15 tables, accepted by Space Science Reviews

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6m), cold (50K), infrared-optimized space observatory that will be launched early in the next decade. The observatory will have four instruments: a near-infrared camera, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph, and a tunable filter imager will cover the wavelength range, 0.6 to 5.0 microns, while the mid-infrared instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5.0 to 29 microns.

The JWST science goals are divided into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the early universe.

The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and active nuclei within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present day.

The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall on to dust-enshrouded protostars to the genesis of planetary systems.

The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems including our own, and investigate the potential for the origins of life in those systems.

To enable these observations, JWST consists of a telescope, an instrument package, a spacecraft and a sunshield. The telescope consists of 18 beryllium segments, some of which are deployed. The segments will be brought into optical alignment on-orbit through a process of periodic wavefront sensing and control.

The JWST operations plan is based on that used for previous space observatories, and the majority of JWST observing time will be allocated to the international astronomical community through annual peer-reviewed proposal opportunities.

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0606175


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Decepticon
post Jun 16 2006, 10:29 PM
Post #21


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I'm looking forward to seeing alpha centauri images with this telescope. smile.gif
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Guest_DonPMitchell_*
post Jun 16 2006, 10:35 PM
Post #22





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QUOTE
JWST is a partnership between ESA, NASA, and the Canadian Space Agency.


How much are various partners putting into this? How much is NASA being asked to pay?
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GravityWaves
post Jul 5 2006, 01:09 AM
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QUOTE (DonPMitchell @ Jun 16 2006, 07:35 PM) *
How much are various partners putting into this? How much is NASA being asked to pay?



Canadians have already helped with the Shuttle arm and ESA has already worked with NASA on Hubble, Cassini-Huygens, Soho and other missions
to save money JWST will be launched by Ariane-5 in French Guiana S.America
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Littlebit
post Jan 22 2007, 03:27 PM
Post #24


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http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/pages/n....mhtml?d=111850
QUOTE
James Webb Space Telescope Mirror Backplane Prototype Passes Critical NASA Space Readiness Tests

A prototype structure that holds the primary mirrors for the optical element of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) passed a key readiness milestone after undergoing a series of rigorous cryogenic tests at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
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SigurRosFan
post Feb 9 2007, 05:36 PM
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- Telescope mirror nears completion
QUOTE
Engineers have finished making the 18 hexagonal elements that will come together to form the telescope's 6.6m primary mirror.


--------------------
- blue_scape / Nico -
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GravityWaves
post Feb 19 2007, 02:12 PM
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"6.6m (22ft) in diameter", that's fantastic !
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ollopa
post May 21 2007, 01:09 PM
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NASA, ESA and the CSA are holding a technical review of the JWST in Dublin, Ireland, next month. Approximately 300 people will attend the meeting, which will be held in the Royal Hospital Kilmainham from Monday June 11th Thursday June 14th. In addition to NASA, ESA and CSA personnel, representatives from a large number of US and European space technology companies will be present.

The JWST Chief Project Scientist John Mather will give two public lectures while in Dublin, one will be in association with the Royal Irish Academy.

We are currently transporting a full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope to Dublin (it will be placed in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Kilmainham and National Museum of Modern Art) for at least 6 weeks.

The School of Cosmic Physics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies is directly involved in developing one of the four main instruments on board JWST - the MIRI - and is hosting next month's meeting.

As this is a technical event, there are limited public events associated with it, but I will post more precise details shortly.
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helvick
post May 21 2007, 06:24 PM
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Great stuff - finally something to go to that is close to home. smile.gif
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djellison
post May 21 2007, 08:18 PM
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This thread will be useless without pics. You have your assignment. Do it smile.gif

Doug
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helvick
post May 21 2007, 08:32 PM
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I'm on it boss. smile.gif
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