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James Webb Space Telescope, information, updates and discussion
jaredGalen
post May 23 2007, 10:23 AM
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Some one has posted some pics (2) of the Full scale model here http://www.flickr.com/photos/scifilaura/32...57594424025181/

I'm in dublin, this is fantastic about the technical review meeting here in Dublin. Can't wait to see the model for real smile.gif


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djellison
post May 23 2007, 10:35 AM
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That's two of you.

STEREO OBSERVATIONS.

Do it. smile.gif

Doug
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 23 2007, 07:29 PM
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Guests






NASA Adds Docking Capability For Next Space Observatory
By Brian Berger
Space News Staff Writer, Space.com
posted: 23 May 2007
6:00 am ET
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jaredGalen
post Jun 6 2007, 11:11 AM
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Anyone have new info on events associated with next weeks technical review of the JWST in Dublin?


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helvick
post Jun 8 2007, 02:27 PM
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I stopped by the Royal Hospital today at lunchtime and found the crew busily putting the replica together - it really is a shock to see just how big it actually is. The idea that something that huge can be launched and will be able to go through that unfolding manouver is astonishing. I'll be going back on Sunday when it's more complete and once or twice next week depending on when it is actually finished to get shots of the fully built model.

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Click here for the full res slideshow. These shots are all a bit rough and ready as I was in a bit of a rush but they'll give you an idea of the scale.
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ollopa
post Jun 9 2007, 01:17 AM
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Members of this forum are especially welcome to the following. Just register as UMSF:




INVITATION & PHOTOCALL ALERT



The next generation of Irish astronomers will take time off from their
Leaving Cert and Junior Cert examinations on Monday to brief journalists
about Ireland's big involvement in a dramatic new space telescope project
that is to revolutionise space research.



Students sitting their Science examinations this week will be graduate
researchers at university by the time the new telescope is launched in 2013
and they will be ideally placed to continue Ireland's strong tradition of
space research.



The students will brief journalists in front of a huge full-scale model of
the two-storey-high James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is to be
launched aboard Europe's powerful “Ariane-5” rocket to replace the
legendary Hubble Space Telescope. A large model of the Ariane rocket will
also be on hand.



The briefing coincides with a major international meeting at the ROYAL
HOSPITAL KILMAINHAM (RHK), which is attracting scientists and engineers
from all over the world. The meeting is hosted by the DUBLIN INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES, a leading centre for research into our cosmic origins.



The full-scale space telescope model was developed by aerospace contractors Northrop Grumman to give a better understanding of the size, scale and complexity of the project. The model is constructed mainly of aluminum and steel, it weighs six tonnes and is the size of two tennis-courts.

The model was transported by ship from the United States after it was
unveilled on the National Mall in Washington DC last month. It required
four container lorries to bring it from Dublin Port to Kilmainham, and a
large crew – including many FÁS apprentices – are spending four days
assembling the model in a large meadow at the back of the RHK.



YOU ARE INVITED TO VIEW/PHOTOGRAPH THE MODEL TELESCOPE AND TO ATTEND A
BRIEFING TO HEAR AT FIRST HAND HOW IRELAND IS MAKING AN IMPACT IN THIS
EXCITING SPACE ENDEAVOUR.



WHEN: Monday, 11 June 2006



WHERE: Royal Hospital Kilmainham (RHK)

The Johnston Room



TIME: 11.30 a.m.



TO MEET: Professor Tom Ray, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies



Dr John C Mather, joint winner of the 2006
Nobel Prize for Physics. This year, Dr. Mather was listed among Time
Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World.



Tony Mc Donald, Enterprise Ireland



Chair: Leo Enright, Chairman, Discover Science and Engineering.
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ollopa
post Jun 9 2007, 01:53 AM
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Currently - and remember these things can change - the following sessions on Monday morning are open to non-mission attendees. You will have to register, but staff have been told to expect UMSF members. If you have a problem, ask to speak with Dympna O'Callaghan. If you feel the need to attend other sessions, talk to Dympna on Monday. This is not a general invite to the public, but we at the Institute for Advanced Studies are very keen to facilitate anyone with a serious interest in astrophysics.


Great Hall (Main meeting room)

Registration Johnston Room (from 8:30)

09:00
Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Welcome (Ray)

09:30
JWST Science Objectives (Gardner)

10:00
JWST Mission Overview and Status (Menzel)

10:30
JWST Observatory Overview and Status (Lynch)

11:00
Break

11:30
OTE and Wavefront Sensing Overview (Feinberg)

12:00
NIRCam (Rieke)

12:30
NIRSpec (Jakobsen)

13:00
Lunch (Baroque Chapel)
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helvick
post Jun 9 2007, 01:31 PM
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I just re-arranged my Monday schedule so I'll be there. smile.gif

I'll take notes and post a report afterwards.
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helvick
post Jun 9 2007, 05:19 PM
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I went back to check on the model's progress and found that the construction team were just putting the last few pieces into place. The pictures really don't do it justice but you can get a good idea of scale by how small the crew on the boom lift look.
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I also added another bunch of shots to the slideshow .
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climber
post Jun 9 2007, 06:01 PM
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Thanks helvick.
I'll come to Ireland by mid august. Do you know if it'll still be there?


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helvick
post Jun 9 2007, 09:43 PM
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My understanding is that it is going to remain for around six weeks so it almost certainly will not still be here, unfortunately. One of the local web sites said it would be here until July 19th which more or less matches up. I don't have any official information though, maybe Ollopa can be more definite.

It is scheduled to be displayed at the Rochester Museum & Science Center, in Rochester, New York starting on August the 26th so it will definitely have to be deconstructed at least 10 days before so that it can be shipped back across the Atlantic. I find it really amusing that it has to travel by ship - it's too big to fly. smile.gif
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nprev
post Jun 10 2007, 12:22 AM
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Helvick, do you know the rest of its schedule? Hoping it'll make a stop in Los Angeles...


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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ollopa
post Jun 10 2007, 12:53 AM
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QUOTE (helvick @ Jun 9 2007, 10:43 PM) *
It is scheduled to be displayed at the Rochester Museum & Science Center, in Rochester, New York starting on August the 26th.


That was actually a couple of years ago. We're still talking to Grumman about the exact repatriation date. Six weeks is just a ball-park number, however we will almost certainly move it from Kilmainham on or before the w/e of June 23rd. I'll keep you posted on a new location (top secret just now!).
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ollopa
post Jun 10 2007, 11:25 PM
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Direct from its Washington premier just last month, the next really big thing in space exploration has arrived in Dublin this week to highlight the past, present and future of Ireland's contribution to space research. Construction crews at the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham spent three days assembling a full-scale model of the two-storey-high behemoth that will replace the legendary Hubble Space Telescope as humanity's sharpest eye on the cosmos.




The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, through it's School of Cosmic Physics, has been actively involved in space missions since the earliest days of space exploration, and this week it is hosting an international meeting of the scientists and engineers who are designing a revolutionary new observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Approximately 300 people will attend the meeting, which will be held in the Royal Hospital Kilmainham from Monday June 11th. to Thursday June 14th .




The JWST is named after the public servant who led America's project to land astronauts on the Moon, but it is a truly international enterprise. The Dublin Institute is providing optical filters for a key instrument aboard the telescope.




“We are immensely proud to be involved in this exciting new project,” said Professor Tom Ray, who works with a team of graduate students in the Institute's School of Cosmic Physics to understand how stars like our own Sun came to be in the first place. The new telescope will also study supermassive black holes and help in the search for planets that might harbour life.




The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies is involved in the telescope project through Ireland's membership of the European Space Agency, and special funding for this Irish contribution came from Enterprise Ireland. Barry Fennell of EI’s International Science & Technology Dept explained that while Ireland contributes to ESA, it also gets much in return: “In the last 7 years, over 50 Irish companies and 10 University research teams have secured contracts with a cumulative value of €35 million. In addition, commercial business being generated by Irish companies and academics directly from ESA-supported developments is estimated to be worth about €25 million a year”.




The large telescope model was brought to Ireland with the help of the Northrop Grumman corporation, prime contractors for the space telescope project. Additional sponsorship came from Omega Air, the Dublin-based aviation services company, and from FÁS, whose skilled apprentices found themselves working on something out of this world.




The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies plans to use the huge model of the space telescope as the centrepiece of a summer-long campaign to raise public awareness of Ireland's involvement in cutting-edge science. The Institute is probably best-known to Dubliners as the custodian of Dunsink Observatory, a much-loved Dublin landmark with a unique place in the history of astronomy.
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nprev
post Jun 11 2007, 01:25 AM
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This is gonna sound trite, but damn that thing is big! Exciting times ahead... smile.gif


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