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ExoMars
monitorlizard
post Mar 16 2012, 08:33 PM
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The best launch windows to Mars come once every fifteen years, meaning you can launch the heaviest payload there on any given rocket. 2018 is the next one, so ESA and Russia will fight hard to make that launch date.
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tolis
post Apr 10 2012, 08:48 PM
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Hi All,

A story has appeared in the news to the effect that Russia and ESA have signed an MoU to collaborate
on ExoMars in 2016 and 2018 with a formal deal expected to be finalised by year's end. For example:

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1204/09exomars/

Perhaps a knowledgeable person could clarify the following point for me:

My understanding is that work on the 2016 EDM and Orbiter must proceed immediately
in order to make the 2016 launch window. Does this new development untie
ESA's hands on this issue, or must further work await until after a formal deal is reached
in which case the 2016 window is effectively lost?

Thanks for any answer.


Tolis

btw, according to the latest update by anatoly zak:

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/exomars_2016.html#russia

a much longer lifetime of the EDM on the surface is envisioned
than the 8 or so days of the original plan. Nice.

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scalbers
post Apr 15 2012, 08:30 PM
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I noticed a similar story at this website:

http://www.sen.com/news/russian-agrees-dea...ve-exomars.html


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nprev
post Apr 16 2012, 12:09 PM
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I must caution anyone who may participate in this thread that political comments will be deleted with no notice.

I understand that politics is a large part of what's happening here, but UMSF just doesn't do that...and for good reasons.

Please confine your comments to the science & engineering of the mission; in the end, that's all that really matters in any case.

Thanks!


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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tolis
post Jul 12 2012, 05:51 PM
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According to a presentation made by Alexander Zakharov during
a workshop I attended last week in Moscow:

http://europlanet.miigaik.ru/2012/English_version/

it appears that neither RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators) nor RHUs (Radioisotope Heater Units)
will be available as part of the Russian contribution to the Exomars EDM lander in 2016.
A depiction of the lander shown during the talk included what looked to me like solar panels.

It is not clear what impact this will have on the lander's expected lifetime once on the surface.

Tolis.




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Paolo
post Aug 31 2012, 08:58 AM
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issue 8 of the ExoMars newsletter is out
it confirms that

QUOTE
The overall design of the Entry, descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM) has been reverted to the configuration without the Russian contributions


also, fabrication of the 2016 orbiter has started


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Paolo
post Oct 1 2012, 11:16 AM
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Testing times for ExoMars drill

what I find funny is that the ExoMars drill is nearly the same drill I was working on for my master thesis back in 1999, when it was to fly on the 2003 Mars Surveyor sample return mission... lots of water under the bridges!


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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Paolo
post Oct 24 2012, 06:03 PM
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I have just read this paper ExoMars Mission 2016: EDM Science Opportunities
interestingly, it looks like the only camera on the lander will be a reflight of the Herschel monitoring camera (which took this stunning sequence http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/herschelplanck...SJZVNUF_0.html) to monitor the descent and landing MARDI-like
note also that the Meridiani landing site (6.1W-1.8S) is very close to Opportunity. I am dreaming of pictures of the re-entry from the surface...


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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MERovingian
post Nov 21 2012, 09:04 PM
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As a European, this should be good news to me indeed:

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1211/21exomars/

Halas! By the time the twenty participating EU states + Russia do agree on everything, pass through the Euro crisis and get the cash, build the hardware and go fly, it will be 2020 at best before they land. Then, it will take until 2021 to get the first picture made public by ESA and finally, if they do as with the Huygens probe on Titan (in a released article about a month ago... what a joke!), it will be another seven years before they let us know how the little Exomars rover landed! Once all is said and done we will be close to 2030 and I'll be dead by then or too old to understand what is that bloody red thing I'm looking at on the computer screen!

Gosh, I wish I'm wrong, so wrong!
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vjkane
post Nov 21 2012, 10:11 PM
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Healthy skepticism aside rolleyes.gif full funding still needs to be secured.

I'm looking to see more on the descent and landing plans -- that is a very capable planned lander and bigger than I believe Russia has done in the past.


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rlorenz
post Nov 22 2012, 01:12 AM
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QUOTE (MERovingian @ Nov 21 2012, 04:04 PM) *
if they do as with the Huygens probe on Titan (in a released article about a month ago... what a joke!), it will be another seven years before they let us know how the little Exomars rover landed!


I can tell you for a fact that the essence of the landing dynamics was made known to the public within about 6 hours of landing. The article by Schroeder et al was a synthesis of data from several different sources to simulate the last few unexplained bumps and wiggles in the DISR data. It is quite normal, and is why it is important to archive and document data well, for new analyses to be made on planetary data many years after it is acquired. The data have been on the NASA PDS and the ESA PSA since 2006, so you could have done it yourself some time ago if you were so impatient.
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stone
post Feb 1 2013, 07:07 AM
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There will be a Exomars Science Team Meeting this month this is the number 5.
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PaulM
post Feb 7 2013, 06:47 PM
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I have been told that there are currently no plans for the 2016 Exomars EDM lander to transmit telemetry during its descent. If true then I think that this would be an unwise decision. From what I have been told, whole point of the Exomars EDM lander is to prove ESA Entry Descent and Landing technology. If the lander was to fail 100m above the surface, much as alegedly happened to MPL in 1999, then no one would know that that was the exact moment that the landing failed.

I have also been told that the Exomars EDM lander will have no solar panel and so is expected to only transmit data for 3 days on the surface of Mars. The consensus amongst the people that I talk to is that a solar panel would be a good idea.
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stone
post Feb 7 2013, 10:06 PM
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I can't remember but I know I read that the lesson learned from Beagel was that communication during decent is very necessary.
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djellison
post Feb 8 2013, 12:19 AM
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That lesson was learned by Beagle 2, CoNTour, and Mars Polar Lander.

Not transmitting during EDL for the tech demonstrator is utterly idiotic.
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