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Kepler Mission
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Aug 31 2007, 06:46 PM
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In which parts of the Electromagnetic spectrum are Kepler's detectors active ( Visible and Infrared ? )
huh.gif
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Aug 31 2007, 06:56 PM
Post #32





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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Aug 31 2007, 08:46 AM) *
In which parts of the Electromagnetic spectrum are Kepler's detectors active ( Visible and Infrared ? )
huh.gif

From the Kepler website: "The [photometer] has a spectral bandpass from 400 nm to 850 nm."
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Sep 8 2007, 01:05 PM
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Kepler mission: Work in progress
http://www.ballaerospace.com/gallery/kepler/
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Del Palmer
post May 5 2008, 06:51 PM
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Just finished submitting your name for LRO? Now send it on Kepler!

http://www.seti.org/kepler/names/





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"I got a call from NASA Headquarters wanting a color picture of Venus. I said, “What color would you like it?” - Laurance R. Doyle, former JPL image processing guy
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GravityWaves
post Jun 14 2008, 04:12 PM
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QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ May 23 2006, 12:57 AM) *
Kepler will be staring at this FOV for 4 years, looking for transits. In this FOV,
there are about 200,000 stars, half of which will meet the criteria for planetary
search (single, non-variable, etc.).



Kepler is expected to be able to discover at least 50 earth sized planets
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Greg Hullender
post Sep 27 2008, 06:27 PM
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Another Kepler update.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2008-179

The spacecraft is in Colorado and survived the termal vacuum test. I note they're only saying it'll launch in 2009 -- I wonder if they have quietly backed off the April 2009 date. Anyway, NASA elsewhere still shows an April 10 launch date.

http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html

--Greg
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Greg Hullender
post Oct 8 2008, 05:04 PM
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They're now showing Kepler scheduled for launch: 2009 March 4, 10:46 pm EST on the Kepler web site.

http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/

Still no countdown though. :-)

--Greg
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Ron Hobbs
post Oct 11 2008, 08:04 PM
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The NASA Launch Schedule now has the Kepler launch set for April 10.

http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html
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Ron Hobbs
post Oct 15 2008, 04:06 PM
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Yesterday, NASA moved the launch of Kepler back to "no earlier than" March 5. They do not list a launch time.
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BPCooper
post Feb 21 2009, 07:56 PM
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I haven't seen any posts on Kepler in a while and with the launch less than two weeks off I figured I might post :-)

The Kepler observatory made the 20 mile trip from the Astrotech cleanroom to LC-17B Thursday morning and after a couple days of delay due to weather was this morning lifted and mounted atop the 13-story Delta 2 rocket that will take it into space in 12 days. Some cleanroom shots from the media viewing a few weeks ago.

Launch is on target for Thursday March 5 at 10:48pm EST. There will be two launch windows of exactly three minutes each that day, stretching from 10:48:43 - 10:51:43pm and 11:16:34 - 11:19:34pm EST. NASA TV coverage begins at about 8pm or 8:30pm; www.nasa.gov/ntv.


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helvick
post Feb 22 2009, 01:11 AM
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Thanks for the update Ben - much appreciated.

Slightly OT but I'm curious about how much time you have to spend just hanging about waiting for launches to get windows defined with a confidence level that enables you to get all your kit prepared for setting up - basically do you end up having to sacrifice weeks\months of time in order to be sure of getting a shot or are you able to actually work a more or less normal life around launch windows?
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Byran
post Feb 26 2009, 06:44 PM
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I hope that Kepler would have to wait for the results is less than Corot. rolleyes.gif

http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/pdf_files/3...2-19_smfile.pdf


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Stu
post Feb 26 2009, 07:03 PM
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Thanks for the link to the Kepler info Byran, fascinating stuff, but there's not a lot of point copying a great chunk of it - or other reports, etc - into your post too. Best to let people follow the link and read it for themselves if they want to. smile.gif


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Greg Hullender
post Feb 26 2009, 11:11 PM
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Although I think this bit is worth posting, since it answers the question of "how long must we wait for results?"

"The first planets discovered by Kepler will be gas giants, similar in size to Jupiter, in close orbits lasting only a few days around their parent stars. Planets in Mercury-like orbits with orbital periods of only a few months will be discovered using data from the first year of operations. Finding Earth-size planets in Earth-like orbits will require the entire length of the 3.5-year Kepler Mission."

If I recall correctly, the reason it takes as long as it does is that they need to see the planet transit three times; once to discover it, a second time to get the period, and the third time to confirm the result.

--Greg
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kwan3217
post Feb 27 2009, 07:28 PM
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Launch has been pushed back a day to check the Delta II for any common parts with the Taurus that failed this week. Launch now no earlier than Friday, 6 Mar 2009 at 10:49:57 p.m. EST (Saturday 7 Mar 2009 03:49:57 UTC)

http://spaceflightnow.com/delta/d339/status.html
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