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Kepler Mission
Drkskywxlt
post Sep 22 2011, 02:16 PM
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http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=38486

Two new planets found by the public in the Kepler data archive from the first 90 days of data. Both are hot super-Earths/sub-Neptunes.
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Hungry4info
post Sep 22 2011, 04:28 PM
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QUOTE (Drkskywxlt @ Sep 22 2011, 09:16 AM) *
Both are hot super-Earths/sub-Neptunes.


Not with those radii!


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Drkskywxlt
post Sep 22 2011, 05:45 PM
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The one is 2.65 R-earth, so that's less than Neptune. The other, you're right, is 8 R-earth, which is about twice Neptune's.

Thanks for the correction.
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marsophile
post Sep 28 2011, 02:45 AM
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QUOTE (Holder of the Two Leashes @ Sep 19 2011, 02:55 PM) *
Sounds like everything out to 87 au will be cleared out.


Does that imply there can be no close-in "hot Jupiters" either? (Since presumably they would need to have migrated in from the "forbidden" zone.)
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Hungry4info
post Sep 28 2011, 11:24 AM
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That seems reasonable. Hot Jupiters aren't expected around either component of a two-star system with low separations. Some counterexamples like Gliese 86 have one component being a post-RGB star, and can be understood by considering the evolution of the system.


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Greg Hullender
post Sep 29 2011, 05:27 PM
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I guess the reasoning is that hot Jupiters form outside the ice line before they migrate in, and, clearly, that can't happen with a system like Alpha Centauri. What's not clear to me, though, is whether something unusually big could form inside the safe zone during the period when all that matter from outside the safe zone is still whizzing around. (Safe is a function of semi-major axis and ellipticity, so lots of stuff in unstable orbits would invade the space that's safe for circular ones.)

But I guess I do know which way to bet. ;-)

--Greg
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Habitable Zoner
post Oct 5 2011, 12:58 PM
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Kepler-18b, 18c, and 18d have been announced. They are a super-earth class planet and two Neptune class planets in close orbit around a sun-sized star. Kepler-18c and 18d are in a slightly out of phase 2:1 orbital resonance. Kepler-18b is described as being "validated" rather than "verified," since its existence has been confirmed by a probability argument based on the absence of apparent background objects in a high resolution image obtained with the Palomar 5-meter telescope. If we set the bar at validation, the discovery process for smaller planets should go considerably more quickly.
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Habitable Zoner
post Nov 2 2011, 11:58 AM
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There is finally a new mission manager update here. The most important points are: (1) "This was the second full quarter in a row with no significant anomalies or unplanned science breaks"; and (2) over 200 abstracts have been accepted for the First Kepler Science Conference at NASA Ames Research Center Dec. 5-9.

More information about the conference is here. The sessions will include:
  • Asteroseismology Across the HR Diagram
  • Earth-analog and sub-Neptune-size Planets
  • Eclipsing and Interacting Binaries
  • Ensemble Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars
  • Exoplanet Theory
  • Extragalactic and Other Astrophysics
  • Giant Planets and Planet Atmospheres
  • Multiple Planet Systems
  • Red Giant Oscillations
  • Stellar Activity and Rotation
  • The Kepler Mission and Exoplanet Statistics

Lastly, there is an article about progress on the mission extension proposal at Space.com here.
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siravan
post Nov 2 2011, 05:00 PM
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QUOTE (Habitable Zoner @ Nov 2 2011, 06:58 AM) *
This was the second full quarter in a row with no significant anomalies or unplanned science breaks


Very good news; but the anomalies were clustered in winter (due to the apparent sun proximity to Cygnus). Let's cross our fingers for the next quarter.
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belleraphon1
post Dec 4 2011, 10:16 PM
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The First Kepler Science Conference
http://kepler.nasa.gov/Science/ForScientis...FTOKEN=16036309

Dates:
December 5-9, 2011

NASA will host a news briefing at 8 a.m. PST, Monday, Dec. 5, to announce new discoveries by the Kepler mission. The briefing, during the Kepler Science Conference, will be in building 152 at NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif.

The briefing will provide an update on the statistical findings since Kepler's Feb. 1, 2011, science data release and introduce a new confirmed planetary discovery. The briefing participants are:

-- Pete Worden, center director, Ames Research Center
-- Natalie Batalha, Kepler deputy science team lead at Ames
-- Bill Borucki, Kepler principal investigator at Ames
-- Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI Research, SETI Institute, Mountain View, Calif.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=35415

A live stream of the Kepler Science Conference will be available at:
http://connect.arc.nasa.gov/kepler

PDF of the conference sessions with complete abstracts
http://kepler.nasa.gov/files/mws/keplercon...21Nov_print.pdf

We are in an era of a star trek but without the starships.... for now we chart courses for the starships, unmanned or crewed, of the future.

Craig
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Explorer1
post Dec 5 2011, 12:50 AM
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Will that be the only streaming link? It's not on the NASA TV schedule....
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belleraphon1
post Dec 5 2011, 12:18 PM
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Only link I know of is the one for the arc stream

I checked the NASA schedule too and did not see it. Still going to check around NASA TV at 8:00 PST (11:00am EST). Their schedule listing is not always accurate.
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Explorer1
post Dec 5 2011, 07:40 PM
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Here we go:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/n...n-briefing.html

Summary by Bad Astronomer:

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastro...-sun-like-star/

And the predictable headlines:

rolleyes.gif

http://news.google.ca/news/story?q=kepler+...ved=0CDMQqgIwAA

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Mongo
post Dec 5 2011, 10:53 PM
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The Habitable Exoplanets Catalog

MOD EDIT: One thing missing here is the word "potentially" just before "habitable"; let's please keep that firmly in mind for this discussion.


2 Confirmed Habitable Exoplanets
14 Candidate Habitable Exoplanets

28 Confirmed Habitable Exomoons
6 Candidate Habitable Exomoons

Exomoons are inferred from planetary dynamics, but none observed yet. (Mongo: I assume that they have been detected via transit timing variations)

Update: The recent confirmation of Kepler 22b (KOI-087) does not qualify as a potential habitable exoplanet on the catalog. It is in the habitable zone of the star but it is also too big and classified here as a Warm Neptunian. Most of the interesting exoplanets in our catalog are Kepler objects too just waiting for confirmation as Kepler 22b did today.
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belleraphon1
post Dec 6 2011, 12:18 AM
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Marcy presentation RV Follow-Up of Small Planets from Kepler: Verification, Masses, and Densities ... Marcy states the limiting radius for a rocky world (something you can walk on and not be underwater or wading through a deep extended H2 atmospere) is 2.5 Earth radii. Wonder how much pressure at the surface of one of these H2 extended atmos planets one would feel at the rocky surface. Or are all H2 extended worlds all so volatile rich, a global ocean will always be present?

New worlds!!!!

wow
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