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International Space Station (ISS)
ljk4-1
post Dec 12 2005, 10:33 PM
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Review of NASA Plans for the International Space Station

Review of NASA Strategic Roadmaps: Space Station Panel, National Research Council

80 pages (approximate), 8 1/2 x 11, 2005

In January 2004, President Bush announced a new space policy directed at human and robotic exploration of space. In June 2004, the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy issued a report recommending among other things that NASA ask the National Research Council (NRC) to reevaluate space science priorities to take advantage of the exploration vision. Congress also directed the NRC to conduct a thorough review of the science NASA is proposing to undertake within the initiative. In February 2005, the NRC released Science in NASA s Vision for Space Exploration, the first report of the two studies undertaken to carry out these requests. The second report focuses on NASA s plan for the ISS. This report provides broad advice on programmatic issues that NASA is likely to face as it attempts to develop an updated ISS utilization plan. It also presents an assessment of potentially important research and testbed activities that may have to be performed on the ISS to help ensure success of some exploration objectives.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11512.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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The Messenger
post Dec 13 2005, 04:42 PM
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From Space Reference Daily:

QUOTE
-- What Mike Griffin *Really* Thinks About NRC's Space Station Report
http://www.nasawatch.com/archives/2005/12/...griffins_p.html


"Bottom line, we're going to have to answer the specific issues in this report. We're going to have
to define the program of activity for ISS that obtains from it the utility that it can provide. We may
NOT be able to fund that activity at present; I consider that almost a fact on the ground. But we
can put in place the kind of peer-reviewed science that we WOULD do, given the money, and that
we WILL do, when we can afford it."


Bob Park's relentless campaign against the ISS is taking its toll...
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 27 2006, 09:06 AM
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Well, two excellent books on ISS are the BIS volumes 1 & 2 of " International Space Station - From Imagination to Reality " available at:

http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...ode/108/l/nl-be

Volume 2 for instance has a complete chapter on all EVAs - spacewalks conducted up to 2005 with each astronaut's individual portrait !
A must have
wink.gif wink.gif
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Bob Shaw
post Jan 27 2006, 06:59 PM
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Does this count as an unmanned spacecraft?

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/SuitSat_...February_3.html

Bob Shaw


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Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
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ljk4-1
post Jan 27 2006, 07:15 PM
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QUOTE (Bob Shaw @ Jan 27 2006, 01:59 PM)
Does this count as an unmanned spacecraft?

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/SuitSat_...February_3.html

Bob Shaw
*


See also:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...indpost&p=38548


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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tty
post Jan 27 2006, 07:17 PM
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QUOTE (Bob Shaw @ Jan 27 2006, 08:59 PM)
Does this count as an unmanned spacecraft?

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/SuitSat_...February_3.html

Bob Shaw
*


"uninhabited" would perhaps be a better term? smile.gif

tty
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ljk4-1
post Jan 28 2006, 01:53 AM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Jan 27 2006, 04:06 AM)
Well, two excellent books on ISS are the BIS volumes 1 & 2 of " International Space Station - From Imagination to Reality " available at:

http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...ode/108/l/nl-be

Volume 2 for instance has a complete chapter on all EVAs - spacewalks conducted up to 2005 with each astronaut's individual portrait !
A must have
wink.gif  wink.gif
*


This NASA book, Walking to Olympus by David S. F. Portree and Robert C. Trevino, has details of every EVA from 1965 to 1997:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/spacenews/fact...dfs/EVACron.pdf


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ljk4-1
post Feb 8 2006, 07:16 PM
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Astrophysics, abstract
astro-ph/0602151

From: Claudine Tur [view email] [via CCSD proxy]

Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2006 08:21:27 GMT (105kb)

Results from the ULTRA experiment in the framework of the EUSO project

Authors: G. Agnetta, P. Assis, B. Biondo, P. Brogueira, A. Cappa, O. Catalano, J. Chauvin (LPSC), G. D'Ali Staiti, M. Dattoli, M.C. Espirito-Santo, L. Fava, P. Galeotti, S. Giarrusso, G. Gugliotta, G. La Rosa, D. Lebrun (LPSC), M.C. Maccarone, A. Mangano, L. Melo, S. Moreggia (LPSC), M. Pimenta, F. Russo, O. Saavedra, P. Scarsi, J.C. Silva, P. Stassi (LPSC), B. Tomè, P. Vallania, C. Vigorito, the EUSO Collaboration

Report-no: LPSC 05167

The detection of Cerenkov light from EAS in a delayed coincidence with fluorescence light gives a strong signature to discriminate protons and neutrinos in cosmic rays. For this purpose, the ULTRA experiment has been designed with 2 detectors: a small EAS array (ETscope) and an UV optical device including wide field (Belenos) and narrow field (UVscope) Cerenkov light detectors. The array measures the shower size and the arrival direction of the incoming EAS, while the UV devices, pointing both to zenith and nadir, are used to determine the amount of direct and diffused coincident Cerenkov light.

This information, provided for different diffusing surfaces, will be used to verify the possibility of detecting from Space the Cerenkov light produced by UHECRs with the EUSO experiment, on board the ISS.

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0602151


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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peter59
post Feb 25 2006, 07:24 PM
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Next example of effective utilization of ISS research facilities.

Bad tee shot in space could mean disaster

What a completely idiotic idea.
ISS should be abandoned, de-orbited and dumped into the ocean before we waste another billion dollars.


--------------------
Free software for planetary science (including Cassini Image Viewer).
http://members.tripod.com/petermasek/marinerall.html
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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Feb 25 2006, 11:53 PM
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Well, maybe we can reach a general consensus on THAT, at any rate. When you have a $100 billion "science facility" whose "experiments" would all be rejected by a junior high school science fair, the situation is a bit much. (I suggested a few years ago that if the amateur rocketry people REALLY wanted to make a major contribution to space exploration, their most productive move would be to wait until the Station was uninhabited and then launch a small suborbital rocket loaded with ball bearings in its path.)
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RNeuhaus
post Feb 26 2006, 08:10 PM
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I think that to have an operable ISS would be very useful thing for any emergency logistics of any further space exploration. I don't agree that ISS project would be cancelled.

Rodolfo
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peter59
post Mar 2 2006, 09:21 AM
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Some hard questions.

What is NASA's Plan for the Space Station?


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Free software for planetary science (including Cassini Image Viewer).
http://members.tripod.com/petermasek/marinerall.html
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michaelSN99
post Mar 4 2006, 07:58 PM
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the ISS does better to be in the news with a newly revealed and hopefully working assembly sequence than golf shot headlines !!!


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ljk4-1
post Mar 14 2006, 05:36 PM
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Msnbc.com (Oberg) -- Space station set for rare eclipse encounter

By chance, orbital crew is due to come within sight of moon's shadow

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11763975/

By James Oberg, NBC News space analyst

Special to MSNBC // Updated: 1:03 a.m. ET March 13, 2006

When the shadow from a total solar eclipse sweeps over Earth on March 29, two
skywatchers should have a guaranteed cloud-free view of the spectacle: NASA
astronaut Bill McArthur and Russian cosmonaut Valery Tokarev, the current
residents of the international space station.

The date with an eclipse will serve as a fitting celestial sendoff for the
station's Expedition 12 crew members, just days before a new international crew
arrives to take their place.

Between now and then, McArthur and Tokarev will be cleaning up and packing up
for the transition. Also on the agenda for the weeks ahead are a couple of tests
designed to assure space station operations for years to come.

The crew's date with an eclipse is something that NASA says is an unexpected
"bonus." Only a handful of humans have witnessed such a phenomenon, and it's not
clear whether the crew will be able to do anything beyond photographing the
moon's shadow on Earth beneath them.

At one point, it looked as if the space station would be flying right through
the shadow.

The station's Zvezda service module had been scheduled to fire up its rocket
engines on Wednesday to adjust the orbit in anticipation of the replacement
crew's launch on March 30. According to German space engineer Gerhard Holtkamp,
that maneuver would have put the station right in the path of the eclipse over
the coast of southern Turkey.

"With the eclipse shadow moving at triple the speed of sound, and the ISS
faster still, the whole thing is a little like shooting two bullets out of
different directions and trying to make them hit each other," he told MSNBC.com
in an e-mail.

Sources within NASA's Mission Control told MSNBC.com that the maneuver had
nothing to do with the eclipse. "It's to set up phasing and lighting for the
next Soyuz exchange," one expert explained in an e-mail. "The eclipse is a
bonus."


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ljk4-1
post Jun 1 2006, 02:18 PM
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NASA Science News for June 1, 2006

A little droid is roaming the corridors of the International Space Station, and more are on the way.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/01....htm?list161084


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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