IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
International Space Station (ISS)
Guest_Richard Trigaux_*
post Jun 1 2006, 02:48 PM
Post #16





Guests






QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jun 1 2006, 02:18 PM) *
NASA Science News for June 1, 2006

A little droid is roaming the corridors of the International Space Station, and more are on the way.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/01....htm?list161084


This story is a bit funny, to have a mini-satellite floating free in the ISS and wandering into the corridors following air movements. That treminds me of an experience I did, taking a small helium baloon (in the shape of a dolphin, bought in a fair) and add it some weight so that it floated without falling nor rising, and let it float freely into my home. It was a bit amazing to see how it managed to travel everywhere, and go from a room to another despites the narrower doors. Wherever it remained stuck, it was free some hours later. But most usually its favourite occupation was to rise above a radiator, scrape the cieling, and descend on the other side of the room, following convection patterns. The ISS people will have some fun with them.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lyford
post Jun 1 2006, 07:38 PM
Post #17


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1261
Joined: 18-December 04
From: San Diego, CA
Member No.: 124



Hmmm. "Her resistance to the mind probe is considerable."



--------------------
Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jun 1 2006, 09:17 PM
Post #18


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



QUOTE (lyford @ Jun 1 2006, 03:38 PM) *
Hmmm. "Her resistance to the mind probe is considerable."



The actual model for the ISS robot from Star Wars was that light saber
practice ball Luke used aboard the Millennium Falcon.

It was originally supposed to be a police drone seen floating around
Tatooine designed to target and zap criminals and other undesirables
of the Empire.

The robot was also an early model for the Death Star, if memory serves.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ustrax
post Jun 13 2006, 09:31 AM
Post #19


Special Cookie
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2168
Joined: 6-April 05
From: Sintra | Portugal
Member No.: 228



I'm going to take a look... smile.gif

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMA64AATME_index_0.html


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jeff7
post Jun 13 2006, 01:10 PM
Post #20


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 477
Joined: 2-March 05
Member No.: 180



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jun 1 2006, 10:18 AM) *
NASA Science News for June 1, 2006

A little droid is roaming the corridors of the International Space Station, and more are on the way.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/01....htm?list161084


From the article:
"If a solar flare zaps one satelliteóno problem."
So they want to launch more satellites, that are disposable to a degree. I just wonder how long until lower Earth Orbit will resemble a giant floating landfill, too dangerous for most spacecraft to safely navigate for prolonged periods.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ustrax
post Sep 21 2006, 02:59 PM
Post #21


Special Cookie
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2168
Joined: 6-April 05
From: Sintra | Portugal
Member No.: 228



You beautiful tiny one...:

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMRHL8LURE_FeatureWeek_0.html

smile.gif


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MahFL
post Sep 22 2006, 10:39 AM
Post #22


Forum Contributor
***

Group: Members
Posts: 951
Joined: 8-February 04
From: North East Florida, USA.
Member No.: 11



I just saw the ISS and it does indeed look brighter after the addition of the 2nd set of Solar Arrays.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Sep 22 2006, 11:30 AM
Post #23


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



I wonder if the ISS will be like the Iridium satellites, making spectacular flashes
when sunlight hits the solar panels just right?

http://www.satobs.org/iridium.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
remcook
post Sep 22 2006, 11:32 AM
Post #24


Rover Driver
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1001
Joined: 4-March 04
Member No.: 47



looks from that website it's not the solar panels that flash. Solar panels will be at right angles to the sun if possible.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Sep 22 2006, 11:42 AM
Post #25


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13705
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Solar Panels will always be oriented as best they can toward the sun. Iridium sats are a special case - they have a set of large aluminium antennae that are at an angle that reflects light onto the ground just right to create the flares.

http://www.obsat.com/irimage_e.html


of course, there's always still scope for the odd flash or flicks if the angle between a part of the station and the sun is right- but I don't think we'll ever see things like the flares occuring.

Of course - if it gets to mag -3 or lower - then we're talking brighter than 50% of Iridium flares anyway smile.gif

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ugordan
post Sep 22 2006, 01:03 PM
Post #26


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3559
Joined: 1-October 05
From: Croatia
Member No.: 523



QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 22 2006, 12:42 PM) *
Of course - if it gets to mag -3 or lower - then we're talking brighter than 50% of Iridium flares anyway smile.gif

That reminds me of one night a while ago, I was watching TV in a dark room and suddenly a bright flash out the window in the corner of my eye caugh my attention. It lasted for maybe a second or two, but was really bright. I immediately felt it had to either be an almost stationary meteor (it was a slow mover) or an Iridium flare, so one check at www.heavens-above.com and there it was: -8 magnitude, predicted right at the time I saw it.
The thing still remains the brightest flare I saw. If only I was looking directly at it!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Sep 23 2006, 07:32 AM
Post #27





Guests






Current position of the ISS:
http://www.heavens-above.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RNeuhaus
post Sep 23 2006, 02:18 PM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1636
Joined: 9-May 05
From: Lima, Peru
Member No.: 385



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Sep 22 2006, 06:30 AM) *
I wonder if the ISS will be like the Iridium satellites, making spectacular flashes
when sunlight hits the solar panels just right?

http://www.satobs.org/iridium.html

Yes, now the ISS is brighter equaling to Venus' ones with the maximum albedo of -3.0 at the proper angle against the sun.

Rodolfo
P.D.Opps, I saw others comment the same about the ISS's abedo as me!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
David
post Sep 23 2006, 02:47 PM
Post #29


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 809
Joined: 11-March 04
Member No.: 56



QUOTE (ugordan @ Sep 22 2006, 01:03 PM) *
That reminds me of one night a while ago, I was watching TV in a dark room and suddenly a bright flash out the window in the corner of my eye caugh my attention. It lasted for maybe a second or two, but was really bright. I immediately felt it had to either be an almost stationary meteor (it was a slow mover) or an Iridium flare, so one check at www.heavens-above.com and there it was: -8 magnitude, predicted right at the time I saw it.
The thing still remains the brightest flare I saw. If only I was looking directly at it!


Back in the old days (say the 1920s-1950s) when engineers were still full of technological hubris (I'm not saying they aren't still, but people are more cynical about that sort of thing now), there were suggestions to orient mirrors in Earth orbit to catch the sunlight and create "permanent daylight" on the nightside.

That's both undesirable and probably impractical, but the phenomenon you describe suggests that, with a degree of control, it might be possible to intentionally illuminate small areas on the Earth's surface for short periods of time, which could be useful in certain instances.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jamescanvin
post Sep 23 2006, 11:44 PM
Post #30


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2162
Joined: 9-February 04
From: UK
Member No.: 16



The russians actually tried this back in 1998, but the mirrior failed to deploy.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 30th July 2014 - 12:56 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.