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My Xmars Gift For The Umsf Members, Poetry?...Bah!
ustrax
post Dec 22 2005, 09:16 PM
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Because we are witnessing the Tomorrow
and because I admire you all for your
knowledge and scientific balance here
are some words from a dreamer of
abysses to come.
They're words, not science, they're words,
not images and, even not the better ones,
they come from the heart, as a comet...

ULTREYA!

Truth hides behind time
And a new chaint rises.

Earths hide behind Earth
And a new chaint rises.

Onward! Onward!
New tides of evolution...
Onward! Onward!
Dust
Wind
Sand
Land...

We follow among rocky waves,
towards us,
We follow among watery islands,
towards us.

Onward! Onward!
Truth hides behind time...
Onward! Onward!
Man dreams, Spirit touches...

Onward! Onward!
Step by step,
building our descendents steps.

Rui Borges
aka ustrax


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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ustrax
post Dec 22 2005, 10:32 PM
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Having a private exchange of messages with a member of this forum I was awared to the possibility of a meeting...
Oh...
How I would love to see us gathered around here:
http://www.abiyoyo.com/portugal/lisboa/belem/belem6.jpg


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"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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mars loon
post Dec 22 2005, 11:35 PM
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QUOTE (ustrax @ Dec 22 2005, 10:32 PM)
Having a private exchange of messages with a member of this forum I was awared to the possibility of a meeting...
Oh...
How I would love to see us gathered around here:
http://www.abiyoyo.com/portugal/lisboa/belem/belem6.jpg
*

That is incredibly inspiring.

Can you describe it please. I am sorry I did not know it before.

is it related to this? to commemorate Vasco da Gama's expedition?
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/263/

Thank you
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ustrax
post Dec 22 2005, 11:48 PM
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QUOTE (mars loon @ Dec 22 2005, 11:35 PM)
That is incredibly inspiring.

Can you describe it please.  I am sorry I did not know it before.

is it related to this? to commemorate Vasco da Gama's expedition?
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/263/

Thank you
*


The picture I've linked is from the Padrão dos Descobrimentos,

'The Monument to the Discoveries was inaugurated in 1960 during celebrations of the 500 year anniversary of the death of the Infant D. Henrique (Henry the Navigator). It evoques the maritime expansion and is designed in the shape of a caravel, showing Henry the Navigator at the prow holding a small caravel, as well as many relevant heroes of Portuguese history (Vasco da Gama, Pedro Álvares Cabral - discoverer of Brazil - Fernão Magalhães - who crossed the Pacific in1520 -, the writer Camões and many others).
Seen from the huge mariners compass this monument fascinates visitors with its impressiveness and its 50 metres height. It is visited by millions of people each year. Cut into the paving stone, the compass (see panel above) was a present from the Republic of South Africa in 1960 and it's best seen from the top of the Monument to the Discoveries, that you can access by elevator located inside the building. The central map, depicting galleons and mermaids, shows the routes of the discoverers in the 15th and 16th centuries.
It is located in Belém, on the bank of the River Tagus, in an unique monumental area and looks particularly dramatic in the light of the late afternoon sun.'

It stands aside the Tower of Betelehem (the name of the district)...

'Belém Tower was built in the Age of the Discoveries (when defending the city was of paramont importance) in tribute to the patron saint of the city, Saint Vicente.

In order to enhance Lisbon’s defence, King João II drew up a plan that consisted of forming a three-fortress-defence on the Tagus’s estuary. It formed a triangle and on each angle, a fortress was constructed: Cascais's fortress on the right bank, S. Sebastião da Caparica on the left bank and Belém Tower in the water.

The tower is replete with Manueline decoration, symbols of the King’s power: cables encircling the building and terminating in elegant knots, armillary spheres, crosses of the Military Order of Christ and naturalistic elements such as the rhinoceros, the first such representation in stone known in Europe.

In time, with the construction of new, more modern and more effective defences, the Tower of Belém lost its role as defender of the entrance of the River Tagus.
As centuries passed, new functions were given to the tower. It was a customs control point, a telegraph station and even a lighthouse.
It also served as a political prison, its storerooms transformed into dungeons, since the time when Philip II of Spain became king of Portugal (1580) and during periods of political unrest. Finally, in 1983 UNESCO classified it as a World Heritage Site.'

About the Monastery...:

'The Jerónimos Monastery is usually referred to as the “jewel” of the Manueline style. This exclusive Portuguese style combines architectural elements from the Gothic and from the Renaissance periods, joining them with a royal and naturalist symbology, that makes it unique and honourable.

In 1496, King D. Manuel I asked the Holy Sé for permission to build a large monastery on the banks of the river Tagus. The works started in 1501 and almost a century later everything was done. D. Manuel I and his descendants were buried in marble tombs located in the chancel of the church and in the transept lateral chapels.

Dedicating the monastery to the Belém Virgin was another factor that influenced the royal decision. The Jerónimos Monastery replaced the church of Saint Mary of Belém where monks of the Christ Order gave assistance to sailors passing through. For this reason, D. Manuel I chose the monks of the Saint Jerónimo Order whose functions were to pray for the soul of the king and give spiritual assistance to the sailors that left Praia do Restelo in discovery of new lands.
Because the monastery was built on the sand banks of the river Tagus, the great earthquake of 1755 had little effect on the structure.
In 1907 it was declared a National Monument and in 1984 it was classified “Cultural Heritage of all Humanity” by UNESCO.
There remains a lot to be said about this monument, but I leave you with one final word... AMAZING!'

They all form a triangle of discovery...I wait you all here...


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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CosmicRocker
post Dec 23 2005, 05:32 AM
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ustrax: That is a beautiful sculpture, and quite dramatic in appearance, especially with the dark storm clouds in the backgound. You wouldn't happen to have a picture of the entire monument with that background, would you? That would be spectacular. It does seem to be a fitting monument to the dreams of the virtual spacefarers, here. Thanks.

Your writings and symbolic uses of words, with the frequent calls to go Onward! and references to the Abyss, descendants, with implications of evolution remind me of the later works of my favorite philosopher, Nikos Kazantzakis. Do you know of him?


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...Tom
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ustrax
post Dec 23 2005, 09:52 AM
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QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Dec 23 2005, 05:32 AM)
ustrax:  That is a beautiful sculpture, and quite dramatic in appearance, especially with the dark storm clouds in the backgound.  You wouldn't happen to have a picture of the entire monument with that background, would you?  That would be spectacular.  It does seem to be a fitting monument to the dreams of the virtual spacefarers, here.  Thanks.

Your writings and symbolic uses of words, with the frequent calls to go Onward! and references to the Abyss, descendants, with implications of evolution remind me of the later works of my favorite philosopher, Nikos Kazantzakis.  Do you know of him?
*


If you go here:
http://www.abiyoyo.com/portugal/lisboa/belem/belem.htm
you can see several images from the Padrão taken at the same time...
And who knows? Maybe someday a similar monument will hommage those, who like our ancestors, will sail the open space 'unleashing themselves from the law of death' 'gaving new worlds to the world'...
Symbolic use of words...I believe that words are very powerful creatures... rolleyes.gif
And the calls to go Onward...maybe their just the reflex of knowing that life is short and my curiosity too, too big...
From Kazantzakis I only know the 'Last Temptation of Christ' but I'll look for more, can you suggest me something?


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"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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ustrax
post Dec 23 2005, 10:00 AM
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QUOTE (ustrax @ Dec 23 2005, 09:52 AM)
From Kazantzakis I only know the 'Last Temptation of Christ'...
*


Oh! And Zorba too...


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Edgar Alan Poe
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TheChemist
post Dec 23 2005, 10:33 AM
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http://www.historical-museum.gr/kazantzakis/

Just pick up anything he wrote, this was a great man/writer/philosopher.
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mars loon
post Dec 23 2005, 01:45 PM
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QUOTE (ustrax @ Dec 22 2005, 11:48 PM)
The picture I've linked is from the Padrão dos Descobrimentos,

'The Monument to the Discoveries ....

It evoques the maritime expansion and is designed in the shape of a caravel, showing Henry the Navigator at the prow holding a small caravel, as well as many relevant heroes of Portuguese history (Vasco da Gama, Pedro Álvares Cabral - discoverer of Brazil - Fernão Magalhães - who crossed the Pacific in1520 -, the writer Camões and many others)....

It is located in Belém, on the bank of the River Tagus, in an unique monumental area and looks particularly dramatic in the light of the late afternoon sun.'...

It stands aside the Tower of Betelehem (the name of the district)...

'Belém Tower was built in the Age of the Discoveries (when defending the city was of paramont importance) in tribute to the patron saint of the city, Saint Vicente .....

There remains a lot to be said about this monument, but I leave you with one final word... AMAZING!'

They all form a triangle of discovery...I wait you all here...
*

Thank you for a Christmas present I will always remember

sailing upwards towards the limitless expanse of Mars and Beyond !!
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aldo12xu
post Dec 23 2005, 04:14 PM
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Truly an inspirational monument to all explorers. Thanks for sharing that and your writing, Ustrax. It would be a glorious night to sit around with a few Marsmates, having a few drinks overlooking the monument, wondering what the next 20 years of Mars exploration will bring us........


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CosmicRocker
post Dec 24 2005, 07:14 AM
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QUOTE (TheChemist @ Dec 23 2005, 04:33 AM)
http://www.historical-museum.gr/kazantzakis/
Just pick up anything he wrote, this was a great man/writer/philosopher.
*

Oh, gee, wow! I never really expected to find someone else who even knew who he was.
QUOTE (ustrax @ Dec 23 2005, 04:00 AM)
Oh! And Zorba too...
*

Those were two of his most popular works. I hesitate to go on, since this is so off-topic for this forum, but I guess this one is your topic, ustrax. cool.gif You asked for a suggestion, and I can make one, with a disclaimer. I gave a copy of this to my best friend a while back. It's only about 22 pages long, but he told me he'd kill me if I ever gave him anything else like that to read. Be forewarned. It's one of those pieces you need to work at to appreciate.

My favorite Kazantzakis work was called, "The Saviors of God." If you (or anyone else, for that matter) want to ignore my warning, send me an email at my forum name@gmail.com. I might be able to find you a copy in the filetype of your choice. I guess if someone would prefer, I could post the file here, but I am not certain of it's copyright ownership. I'm certain the author wouldn't have a problem with a certain amount of "fair use" to spread his words.


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...Tom
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