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Jpl Engineers & Scientists
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 28 2005, 10:06 PM
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Let's start this listing with Dr Bruce MURRAY:
http://www.jaxa.jp/news_topics/interview/v...part2_p1_e.html
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RNeuhaus
post Dec 28 2005, 10:31 PM
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Very interesting articles. It is about the philosophy and attitude against the failure between the occident and Japan.

Rodolfo
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Bob Shaw
post Dec 29 2005, 01:06 AM
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QUOTE (RNeuhaus @ Dec 28 2005, 11:31 PM)
quote in reply! removed



Rodolfo:

It's more than that, in the sense that it's also about management of scientific programmes in general, but what it certainly is, is a very clear way forward for JAXA ('two thirds of all Mars missions fail'). Sadly, Hayabusa doesn't get a mention - I hope that Japan doesn't go into denial about what was (note the past tense) a spectacular mission.

Bob Shaw


--------------------
Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
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RNeuhaus
post Dec 29 2005, 03:30 AM
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Bob: I am sure that the japanese culture is very perfecionist and have catch up mind. During the decade 70-80, they copies the occident technology (radio, TV, camera, autos, etc.) , study them and perfection them and they make them with even much higher quality than the counterparts.

In analogy, I think they will excel if they copies the Russian, American, European and others space technologies and they will most probably make them an even much better the counterpart such as the Hayabusa which has nearly almost obtained their very ambitious objectives with automated navigation to catch Hayabusa, employing a very economic ion engine (cheaper than a good steak!!!), land autonomously on Hayabusa (no one knows for a long seconds what is happening that).

Rodolfo
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 31 2005, 12:52 PM
Post #5





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Well I started this thread to point out that 99% of the JPL Engineers & Scientists are very approachable; certainly nowadays with e-mail… smile.gif
But as a 10-year old kid I used to write to NASA and got really good replies from Dr Charles HALL (Pioneer), Dr Gerry SOFFEN (Viking), Dr Bruce MURRAY (JPL director) and Dr Edward STONE (JPL director)... ohmy.gif
http://beacon.jpl.nasa.gov/exhibits/directors/index.htm

How is Your experience with this ?
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ljk4-1
post Jan 23 2006, 06:09 PM
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Far Travelers: The Exploring Machines by Oran Nicks

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1985024813.pdf

Warning: 44.3 MB


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 7 2006, 07:37 PM
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Just noted this edition of design news featuring Brian Muirhead, it goes a stagering price !

http://cgi.ebay.com/CALTECH-MARS-MADNESS-R...1QQcmdZViewItem

ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif
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mars loon
post Feb 11 2006, 09:16 PM
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On this topic, Brian Muirhead has co-authored a very good mars book titled "Going to Mars: The Stories of the People Behind NASA's Mars Missions Past, Present and Future"

more at this listing:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/067102796...ce&n=283155
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 12 2006, 04:06 PM
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Already have it ( see my weblog wink.gif )

http://mars-literature.skynetblogs.be/
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ljk4-1
post Jun 2 2006, 02:47 PM
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Griffin visits JPL

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=20785

An excerpt:

In the future he expects JPL to continue to attract new business by competing
for missions, but, "If I think JPL is in danger of falling below having the
right amount of work to cover the JPL staff, then I will do as I have done at
other places � I will find you a mission. If you can win enough to keep up the
level you're at, you don't need me to do anything."

However, he discouraged JPLers from going after major new work that would drive
the lab's workforce beyond the current level. "If you kill more than you can
eat, I'll probably ask you to send some of that somewhere else."

"A gain in people at one center is a loss in people at another center, or it is
a removal of dollars from industry into the federal civil service," said
Griffin. "That's not acceptable. And it's not acceptable to be moving people and
moving significant numbers of jobs from one center to another."

In response to a question, Griffin also said he hopes Congress will not restore
cuts he made in the proposed fiscal year 2007 budget for scientific research and
analysis.

"I hope Congress won't restore it, because it will come at the expense
of a mission," he said. "The budget I put forward is the best budget I can do
given all the constraints I have. If you push on the bean bag somewhere, it will
pop out somewhere else. There will be other unhappy people, they will just be in
other zip codes."

Griffin cited the importance of placing humans and cargo in low- Earth orbit "an
essential first step" in the next stage of exploration. "It's got to be done
right," he said.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Guest_DonPMitchell_*
post Jun 2 2006, 05:04 PM
Post #11





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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Dec 31 2005, 05:52 AM) *
Well I started this thread to point out that 99% of the JPL Engineers & Scientists are very approachable; certainly nowadays with e-mail… smile.gif
But as a 10-year old kid I used to write to NASA and got really good replies from Dr Charles HALL (Pioneer), Dr Gerry SOFFEN (Viking), Dr Bruce MURRAY (JPL director) and Dr Edward STONE (JPL director)... ohmy.gif
http://beacon.jpl.nasa.gov/exhibits/directors/index.htm

How is Your experience with this ?


I've had good luck with email to Ed Stone...but then again he was my PhD advisor. :-)

I worked in Ed's Space Radiation Lab from 1978 to 1981, and it was a great experience. He is a rare example of a man who is a good person, a great scientist, and a great manager of complex tasks. The Voyager Jupiter and Saturn encoutners both happened while I was there, and it was amazing to watch the orchestration of fantastically complex operations. I worked on another project (a big satellite called HEAO-C).

When a paper for the HEAO project was published, the whole team would meet for a couple days to go over the paper line by line. Ed would ask, "Could this be made more understandable by a scientist who is not a specialist in cosmic rays?". And his grant proposals! How do you get funding for $100 million projects? By writing a grant proposal that is a higher quality scientfic document than most finished journal papers! Beautiful explainations of what is known, what is not known, why is it important, what is the calculated error of measurments, etc, etc.
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ljk4-1
post Sep 26 2006, 02:31 PM
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JPL Director Dr. Charles Elachi recently spoke at Cornell University:

http://cornellsun.com/node/18553

To quote:

He began with an old Theodore Roosevelt quote: “Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.” In this spirit, Elachi reaffirmed why astronomy is important and necessary.

He asked the audience, “What if our ancestors had never explored? Never left their caves? Never experimented with fire?” This is a primary motivation for science in general, but Elachi went further and said, “Astronomy holds the real possibility of answering the biggest questions: What is this place? How did it happen? How common are we? Why us? Why now?” After answering these big picture questions, we end up learning more about ourselves.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 11 2007, 02:21 PM
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Russian engineers and policy makers of the Space age:
http://www.mentallandscape.com/V_Biographies.htm
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 20 2007, 04:22 PM
Post #14





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And of course:
http://www.boulder.swri.edu/photos/

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monitorlizard
post Jan 21 2007, 12:45 AM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Dec 31 2005, 06:52 AM) *
Well I started this thread to point out that 99% of the JPL Engineers & Scientists are very approachable; certainly nowadays with e-mail… smile.gif
But as a 10-year old kid I used to write to NASA and got really good replies from Dr Charles HALL (Pioneer), Dr Gerry SOFFEN (Viking), Dr Bruce MURRAY (JPL director) and Dr Edward STONE (JPL director)... ohmy.gif
http://beacon.jpl.nasa.gov/exhibits/directors/index.htm

How is Your experience with this ?

It's always been highly variable with me. I got much better replies from JPL scientists in the 1970's, with the project scientist for Mariner Venus/Mercury (can't remember the name) and Dr. Conway W. Snyder, Viking Orbiter scientist. They not only answered questions, but sent sizeable packages of papers, photos, etc.

To expand the topic slightly, I was a teenager when Apollo 17 launched, and before the mission I decided to write to every science instrument team on the mission. I think I got addresses from Aviation Week and Space Technology ads. Some corporations didn't reply at all, some sent a press photo and small description, and a few were extremely generous. Bendix sent a multihundred page manual on the Apollo 17 ALSEP, plus several smaller goodies. But John Hopkins University APL gets the grand prize for generosity. They built the UV Spectrometer for the Command Module SIM bay. They sent a complete set of blueprints plus a copy of the Critical Design Review! I could have built my own. Ah, the days before ITAR made everyone paranoid about sharing technical details.
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