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Voyager Spacecraft Hardware
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 3 2006, 06:37 PM
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Some questions on the basic hardware of the Voyager spacecraft:

1. From which material was the decahedral space bus made ( Aluminium ? )
2. Exact weight of the spacecraft - literature gives numbers between 792 and 825 kilograms ?


Some additional questions:

1. The Deep Space Network of worldwide antenna sites wasn't sufficient to collect the faint signal of the distant spacecraft once beyond Saturn ... I know that the twenty-seven 25-meter steerable radio antennes of the Very Large Array in New Mexico were linked with DSN ... when was this done exactly?
( 1989 Neptune encounter only ? )
2. What is the actual telecommunications time-lag 1-way to Earth (after having passed the bow-shock )

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ugordan
post Jan 3 2006, 07:22 PM
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As far as telecoms delay is concerned, Heavens above site says one-way light time for Voyager 1 is currently 13.66 hrs and Voyager 2 10.99 hrs.


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Guest_Analyst_*
post Jan 3 2006, 07:40 PM
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Check out the Voyager Neptune Travel Guide, much more than a press kit:

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1990004096.pdf

and the current status reports:

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/weekly-reports/index.htm

Also interesting if you have read the Travel Guide and know what DTR, PWS or CCS means:

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/soe-sf...g_schedule.html

Have fun!
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 3 2006, 08:32 PM
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Thanks, are there any High-resolution Voyager spacecraft images online (BOth NASA-JPL and NASA-KSC only post normal resolution artist impressions of the Voyager hardware ) dry.gif

I only have the NASA-JPL artist impression P-23836A showing Voyager 2 near Uranus, but scanning from a glossy litho doesn't give good results sad.gif
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Guest_Analyst_*
post Jan 13 2006, 07:23 AM
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QUOTE
2. Exact weight of the spacecraft - literature gives numbers between 792 and 825 kilograms ?


Spacecraft 1820 p, including 231 p science instruments (=825,53 Kg)
Propulsion module (SRM) 2690 p
Total including adapter to centauer upper stage 4630 p

This gives 120 p for the adapter.

Source: Dethlolt, H.C./Schorn, R.A.: To The Outer Planet's And Beyond, Voyager's Grand Tour, Washington, London 2003.

The authors are citing: NASA news releas No. 77-136 (Voyager Press Kit). Does anyone has a link?

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DDAVIS
post Jan 14 2006, 09:53 AM
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[quote=PhilCo126,Jan 3 2006, 08:32 PM]
Thanks, are there any High-resolution Voyager spacecraft images online (BOth NASA-JPL and NASA-KSC only post normal resolution artist impressions of the Voyager hardware ) dry.gif

Not very high res, but I have a couple Voyager mockup 3D images at this page:
http://www.donaldedavis.com/PARTS/3DPHOTOS.html

I have taken many digital photos of the Von Karman auditorium Voyager spacecraft mockup, let me know what angles you would like and I'll dig them up.

Don
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 3 2007, 04:27 PM
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Only some gif images labeled "unknown" ( = no NASA photo-number )
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/image/assembly.html
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dilo
post Feb 3 2007, 10:12 PM
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Amazing pictures, Phil.
Can someone explain why the dark color of the blankets, contrary to the usual gold cover? Which material they used?


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Ian R
post Feb 4 2007, 01:38 AM
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Is the Von Karman auditorium Voyager spacecraft really a mockup? I was always under the impression that it was Voyager 3.


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Paolo
post Feb 4 2007, 09:29 AM
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QUOTE (dilo @ Feb 3 2007, 11:12 PM) *
Amazing pictures, Phil.
Can someone explain why the dark color of the blankets, contrary to the usual gold cover? Which material they used?


JPL started using black thermal blankets on Mariner 4. They had had many issues with thermal control on Mariner 2.
From the paper "Mechanical evolution of the Mariner spacecraft" by J.N. Wilson (1966)
"Although the black shields absorbed more solar energy than did the Mariner II white shields, the uncertainty in the amount of energy absorbed was less. Increased layers of insulation allowed the total heat transmitted through the shield to be reduced to a minimum"


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 4 2007, 11:01 AM
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First I would like to thank those UMSF forum-members who contacted me off-forum... Here I'm sharing another 'artwork' wink.gif
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dilo
post Feb 5 2007, 06:31 AM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Feb 4 2007, 10:29 AM) *
JPL started using black thermal blankets on Mariner 4. They had had many issues with thermal control on Mariner 2.

Grazie, Paolo!
Is a strange motivation, anyway I like very much this black dressing: it looks somewath alien today! rolleyes.gif


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post May 6 2007, 02:04 PM
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Here's another small resolution view of the Voyager in black blankets in the space simulation chamber. Notice the position of the booms ohmy.gif
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post May 6 2007, 02:08 PM
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Sharing an amazing view of the check-out of Voyager's 13 meter long magnetometer in fully extended position. In space, with "zero gravity" conditions, the triangular epoxy glass mast spiraled from its housing and provided a rigid support for the two magnetometers at mid-point and far end of the boom, seen here above the test equipment.
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edstrick
post May 7 2007, 07:30 AM
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The dual magnetometer set was an innovation pioneered by Mariner 10, where it would have taken a significant fraction of the very small mission budget to produce a "magnetically clean" spacecraft. The mid-way mag detects approximately the same spacecraft induced field as the outer mag, but at several times the field strength. Both instruments detect the same exterior field. As spacecaraft powere is switched on and off to different equipment, scan platforms and scanning instruments scan, etc, the difference between the two calibrates the spacecraft field component accuratly so it can be eliminated.
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