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Uranian Satellite Image Processing
volcanopele
post Jan 6 2006, 05:55 PM
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Before the T9 data came down, I got a little bored, and played around with some Voyager data of Ariel. The mosaic (oft produced) I generated is below. Again, this mosaic has been produced by a number of folks on the net, so this isn't really new, but I thought I would get this product out there anyway. I stretched the image such that only a few crater rims would have a DN=255 (other mosaics boost the contrast a bit too much, overexposing the ejecta around Melusine, for example. I also ran this image through a high pass filter, sharpening the image.

Enjoy!
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elakdawalla
post Jan 6 2006, 06:23 PM
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Very nice, Jason! I like the extra detail that you get by high pass filtering and not over-stretching it.

A general comment/question about the Uranian satellite images...because of the season, all of the illuminated parts of all of the satellites in all of the images were pretty much in the southern hemisphere, right? Yet it's really rare to see the Uranian satellite images oriented so that the south pole is at the bottom of the images. I usually rotate any such views before I post them to make them hemispheres illuminated from the bottom, assuming that that puts north at the top. Is that right?

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volcanopele
post Jan 6 2006, 06:57 PM
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You're right, South is approximately to the left.


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Phil Stooke
post Jan 6 2006, 07:00 PM
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Here's another one from shortly before Jason's. This is a composite of all the frames from the sequence, chosen to give the maximum surface coverage (hence a small extension at the top from a lower quality frame, not usually included in previous versions of this mosaic).

Phil

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Phil Stooke
post Jan 6 2006, 07:03 PM
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... and the one before that. This is a 'super-resolution' composite of several frames from a color sequence.

Phil

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Rob Pinnegar
post Jan 7 2006, 12:27 PM
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Why don't you re-post some of your Umbriel shots here, Phil? This would be a good place to put them.
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tedstryk
post Jan 7 2006, 06:02 PM
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Great mosaic work!

I did some work with Ariel images a while back, including this approach sequence, using super-resolution where appropriate data was available.


Here are two of the images in color:



Here is the night side from the same images as Jason's mosaic.




Here is my best effort with Umbriel.

http://pages.preferred.com/%7Etedstryk/umbriel.html

Also, here are similarly processed images of Oberon.





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tedstryk
post Jan 11 2006, 07:46 PM
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Here is a new version I produced of the Ariel closest mosaics.



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volcanopele
post Jan 11 2006, 08:02 PM
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Very nice ted. I like the approach sequence, as it clearly shows the rotation of Ariel.


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tedstryk
post Jan 16 2006, 03:18 PM
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That is neat to see. I really like my last on though, because it shows the night side more clearly. Here is a slightly improved version (I reduced a frame border line).



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tedstryk
post Jan 18 2006, 03:34 AM
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Here is a color view of the night side. Of course, the night side is colorized, since there is no color data available, as are some areas near the terminator.




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ugordan
post Jan 18 2006, 07:16 AM
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Very, very nice, Ted!
The stuff you manage to pull out of the old Voyager imagery more resembles Cassini-quality pics than poor-old-vidicon-tube Voyagers! smile.gif


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Phil Stooke
post Jan 19 2006, 05:27 PM
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Ted's stuff is great - keep it up! I hope you recover from your recent crash OK.

Not to ignore Rob Pinnegar's request - Hi Rob! - but I've been too busy to deal with it. Teaching again this term. If somebody wants to find those posts and link back to them that would be fine. I'd rather not post a second time. But too busy to search for the old post.

Oops - gotta go!

Phil


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ljk4-1
post Jan 24 2006, 02:16 PM
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Today, January 24, is the twentieth anniversary of Voyager 2's flyby of the planet Uranus, the first probe to that world.

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/science/uranus.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_2

Four days later, nearly everyone forgot about this mission and its images of a bland blue ball.

http://www.fas.org/spp/51L.html


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tedstryk
post Jan 24 2006, 05:39 PM
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QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 24 2006, 02:16 PM)
Today, January 24, is the twentieth anniversary of Voyager 2's flyby of the planet Uranus, the first probe to that world.

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/science/uranus.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_2

Four days later, nearly everyone forgot about this mission and its images of a bland blue ball.

http://www.fas.org/spp/51L.html
*


Funny to think of...That was my 7th birthday. rolleyes.gif Of course, in those days, I don't think I had even heard of Voyager 2.


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