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Uranian Satellite Image Processing
ljk4-1
post Jan 25 2006, 02:56 PM
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QUOTE (Rob Pinnegar @ Jan 24 2006, 10:00 PM)
We had to use carrier pigeons!
*


Ha - I remember when the Chinese were using some kind of new fangled war invention called "fire arrows"!


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ljk4-1
post Jan 25 2006, 04:37 PM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Jan 24 2006, 02:20 PM)
I was digging through some boxes of memorabilia yesterday, and I came across my issue of Sky & Telescope magazine with Voyager 2's flyby of Saturn.  Wow, that seems like ages ago!  (and I had already been subscribing for 13 years by then)

*


A nice big version of the artwork on that S&T cover can be found here:

http://www.donaldedavis.com/PARTS/allyours.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Ames
post Jan 25 2006, 05:12 PM
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Well it must be good news that so many of the active participants here are so young.

It's strange but when I see tecnical discussions I visualise old beardy blokes[guys].

Good for you kids! tongue.gif

Nick

(Child of the Apollo age)
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volcanopele
post Jan 25 2006, 07:10 PM
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QUOTE (Jeff7 @ Jan 24 2006, 09:01 PM)
1986, I was 4. I don't know when exactly my interest in planets began, but by 4th grade, I knew more about the planets than the teacher did. I could recite the orbital times of all the planets, and the diameters of some. Most of that information came courtesy of Isaac Asimov's Library of the Universe books, which were thin but informative books made shorlty after Voyager 2's flyby of Neptune. One per planet and one for the Sun.
Still remember seeing The Grand Tour video, and cringing that it would be awhile until the 1997 launch of Cassini...and then the 7 year trip too. Just seemed like forever.
*

By the 4th Grade I knew the names of all the moons of Jupiter (only 16 back then). Now, with 63, I've given up trying.

My interest in present day planetary science (i.e. not just what I could find in books at the school library) started with Galileo orbit insertion.


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&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
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Jyril
post Jan 25 2006, 10:52 PM
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Galileo orbit insertion? But that was just a few years ago... It could NO WAY be 10 years!


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The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine.
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tedstryk
post Jan 25 2006, 11:13 PM
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Interesting you say that, volcanopele...It was in fourth grade when I began taking interest. I remember I would always get astronomy books for Christmas, but unfortunately it was lost on my family and friends that there is a difference between an interest in the planets and deep sky objects and star charts (the latter two are interesting granted, but were never of great interest to me).


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David
post Jan 26 2006, 01:28 AM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jan 25 2006, 07:10 PM)
By the 4th Grade I knew the names of all the moons of Jupiter (only 16 back then).  Now, with 63,
*


But only 48 of them have names yet -- and by the time the rest are named, there will probably be another twenty added...

My goal in that regard is "passive recognition" -- that when I see the name, I can say "oh, that's a Jovian moon" but the only ones I feel I ought to know are the ones discovered before the mid-70s -- back when I was young and the solar system was simple smile.gif .

My approach for the moons of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune is similar. For asteroids, I don't even bother, but then who does?
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ljk4-1
post Jan 26 2006, 02:01 AM
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QUOTE (David @ Jan 25 2006, 08:28 PM)
My approach for the moons of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune is similar. For asteroids, I don't even bother, but then who does?
*


There are people who remember pi out to thousands of digits, so what's a few moons and assorted space rocks?

http://www.joyofpi.com/


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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David
post Jan 26 2006, 03:28 PM
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QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 26 2006, 02:01 AM)
There are people who remember pi out to thousands of digits, so what's a few moons and assorted space rocks?

http://www.joyofpi.com/
*


The record-holder claims to have memorized 40K digits of pi. Of course, as his technique suggests, he only has ten values to work with, and the trick is memorizing their permutations; whereas memorizing the names of all the asteroids involves a new and arbitrary value for each one. Still, I suppose it could be done for just the named asteroids (last I looked there were fewer than 12K of them). But the unnamed asteroids run to over 100K, which I think is beyond the reach of even the most heroic feats of memory.
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JRehling
post Jan 26 2006, 05:40 PM
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I remember my interest began when a Popeye cartoon showed him in space, and I asked my Mom which planet had rings (and she correctly answered Saturn). Reflecting an interest that was already in place, I received an astronomy book for Christmas when I was 5; I remember a year earlier when I was *3* just short of 4 looking up at the Moon while Apollo 17 was on the surface.

When I was in fourth grade, I was subscribed to Science magazine just for the space articles. At some point, I figured I must know more about astronomy than anyone my age, and if I just "maintained my lead", I would someday know more than anyone in the world. But I gave that up; volcanopele has taken that charge seriously.

This month, I finally used my vintage-1979 telescope to take passable space pictures...

Galileo orbital insertion also re-awakened my interest, but the main credit is due to Internet coverage of Galileo. In the 1970s, I would clip newspaper stories, and buy a new book every three years to download "the latest" information. Internet coverage of Galileo was like drinking from a firehose.
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 26 2006, 05:50 PM
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Yes, the internet is amazing. These days I can hardly find the time to do any real work at all.

Apollo 8 got me very seriously interested - but building on a kid-style interest from about 1965 on. Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very Heaven! (to quote the old sheep of the Lake District). But I also started by building scrapbooks of news cuttings etc., until now I can barely move for the piles of junk which surround me. I have to take students to another room when I need to talk to them.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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tedstryk
post Feb 17 2006, 02:48 AM
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Here is a new version of some of the best Ariel images.




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tedstryk
post Feb 17 2006, 07:54 PM
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Here is a super-res of Titania. It is a very distant shot, but it is the best of the OGV images for this moon. The O, G, and V frames, in their original size but contrast stretched and a bit cleaned up, are below.



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tedstryk
post Feb 18 2006, 02:01 AM
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Here is a full Titania shot.



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dvandorn
post Feb 18 2006, 02:22 AM
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Reminds me a lot of Callisto, at least at comparable resolution.

-the other Doug


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“The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.” -Mark Twain
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