IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Congratulations To Alan Et. Al., Now hurry up and wait... :)
djellison
post Jan 19 2006, 08:51 PM
Post #1


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13709
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Just a quite post-sep thread to say congratulations to Alan and the team, here's to a clean checkout and small TCM's smile.gif Many thanks for taking the time to share the experience to date with us here, your efforts are very much appreciated.

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mchan
post Jan 19 2006, 08:55 PM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 593
Joined: 26-August 05
Member No.: 476



Thanks especially for your time in replying to questions here. This public outreach really gives a sense of involvement in the mission.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
odave
post Jan 19 2006, 09:05 PM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 510
Joined: 17-March 05
From: Southeast Michigan
Member No.: 209



Yes, congratulations and best hopes for a problem-free cruise. Thanks for taking us along for the ride.

If Accoutrements ever comes out with spacecraft PI action figures, they should use Alan and Steve Squyres for the models!

smile.gif


--------------------
--O'Dave
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Boxcarx
post Jan 19 2006, 09:20 PM
Post #4


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 19-January 06
From: Chicago
Member No.: 649



I think it's amazing that people like Alan and his crew can put together such a mission and initiate it. I mean, there must only be a handful of people on this earth that have the technical knowledge to do that.

My question is that once the craft wakes up 6 months prior to the Pluto encounter, will it have time to take one or two pictures and send us a teaser image of Pluto? I think it'll drive me crazy to know that NH has a ton of images but we'll have to wait a few weeks before we can see any of them.

David
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Jan 19 2006, 09:25 PM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



Congratulation too!! biggrin.gif
(and hope NH isn't really going to encounter Venus, as launch director said!) tongue.gif


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tom Tamlyn
post Jan 19 2006, 09:27 PM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 273
Joined: 1-July 05
From: New York City
Member No.: 424



QUOTE (Boxcarx @ Jan 19 2006, 04:20 PM)
My question is that once the craft wakes up 6 months prior to the Pluto encounter, will it have time to take one or two pictures and send us a teaser image of Pluto?  I think it'll drive me crazy to know that NH has a ton of images but we'll have to wait a few weeks before we can see any of them.
*


Alan addressed this at the press conference. Observations from the approach will be transmitted to earth on a daily basis until shortly before the approach. If I recall correctly, 6 weeks before the encounter, NH images will supass the best that Hubble can do. So there should be lots of pictures of Pluto looming larger.

TTT

P.S. Alan also announced that some of Clyde Tombaugh's ashes are on board, as was surmised by many members here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RNeuhaus
post Jan 19 2006, 09:32 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1636
Joined: 9-May 05
From: Lima, Peru
Member No.: 385



I join to this topic to express that I am very grateful to hear from your replies and also of your friends from NH team. I am very impressed of the organization NH team that is composed many groups (NASA, Boeing, Lookheed Martin, UJHAPL, Alan's university, what else that I cannot recall it or haven't heard of it). wink.gif

Also many thanks for the USMF manager, Doug, to provide us the great tool so that we can join and share about the NH's ride to Pluto! wink.gif

Rodolfo
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Jan 19 2006, 09:36 PM
Post #8


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4200
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



QUOTE (RNeuhaus @ Jan 19 2006, 09:32 PM)
I join to this topic to express that I am very grateful to hear from your replies and also of your friends from NH team.  I am very impressed of the organization NH team that is composed many groups (NASA, Boeing, Lookheed Martin, UJHAPL,  Alan's university, what else that I cannot recall it or haven't heard of it).  wink.gif

Also many thanks for the USMF manager, Doug, to provide us the great tool so that we can join and share about the NH's ride to Pluto!  wink.gif

Rodolfo
*


Congratulations! To Jupiter, to Pluto, and beyond!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lyford
post Jan 19 2006, 09:38 PM
Post #9


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1261
Joined: 18-December 04
From: San Diego, CA
Member No.: 124



Congratulations to a good return on all the hard work! There's a reason things go right and that is due to the dedication and professionalism of the team leaders and members. And thanks for visiting us as well -

To Infinity and Beyond! smile.gif


--------------------
Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Boxcarx
post Jan 19 2006, 10:01 PM
Post #10


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 19-January 06
From: Chicago
Member No.: 649



Assuming that there are quite a few people working on the NH program, what do they do during the big gaps of no activity of the space craft? Are they shared among other programs within NASA? I can't imagine a job where I'm free to go for 7 or 8 years and then I have to come back!

David
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Jan 19 2006, 10:06 PM
Post #11


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 527
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



QUOTE (Boxcarx @ Jan 19 2006, 03:01 PM)
Assuming that there are quite a few people working on the NH program, what do they do during the big gaps of no activity of the space craft?  Are they shared among other programs within NASA?  I can't imagine a job where I'm free to go for 7 or 8 years and then I have to come back!

David
*


Spend those 'tween years trying to get New Horizons 2 funded. biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jan 19 2006, 10:12 PM
Post #12


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



QUOTE (Tom Tamlyn @ Jan 19 2006, 04:27 PM)
P.S.  Alan also announced that some of Clyde Tombaugh's ashes are on board, as was surmised by many members here.
*


Wonderful news. I am glad to know that the first human to leave our Sol system for the larger Milky Way galaxy (in some form at least) will be Dr. Tombaugh. He certainly deserves the honor.

Does anyone have or know where images of the capsule holding his ashes can be found? Where were they placed on the probe? Did a commemorative plaque or other message accompany them?

And if NH is ever found by starfaring ETI or our descendants, perhaps they will also have the technology to analyze Dr. Tombaugh's remains to learn something about a representative sample of a Twentieth Century human being from Earth.

I did a Google search for the news, and this is the odd place I found it (scroll way down):

http://www.superbowl.com/news/story/9170836

Audio of Clyde's widow, Patricia, talking about her husband:

http://web.dailycamera.com/video/todd/Patr...-2006-01-15.mp3

And just to throw this in, interesting article from last May by Alan Stern explaining how he came up with the probe's final name of New Horizons:

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/369/1

Voyager 3 had actually been considered, but Voyager was a JPL project. They better start naming some other deep space probes Voyager 3 and so on, otherwise we won't have V'Ger to deal with in 300 years!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V'ger


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jan 19 2006, 10:20 PM
Post #13


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13709
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 19 2006, 10:12 PM)
Does anyone have or know where images of the capsule holding his ashes can be found?  Where were they placed on the probe?  Did a commemorative plaque or other message accompany them?


I'd have thought that would be something of a private matter between Clyde's family and Alan.

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jan 19 2006, 10:27 PM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



QUOTE (djellison @ Jan 19 2006, 05:20 PM)
I'd have thought that would be something of a private matter between Clyde's family and Alan.

Doug
*


The container and commemorative plaque for Eugene Shoemaker aboard Lunar Prospector was shown in public and with a fair amount of pride by its makers and his family.

I wasn't asking for a view of the ashes, just wondering if they had some kind of marker for it.

It's just nice to know that I once shook the hand of the first man to leave the Sol system.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rob Pinnegar
post Jan 19 2006, 10:53 PM
Post #15


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 501
Joined: 2-July 05
From: Calgary, Alberta
Member No.: 426



Voyager 3 would have been a very good name for historical reasons, in spite of the fact that the spacecraft looks quite different from Voyagers 1 and 2. (But in a hundred years no one will care about that.) It's a pity they couldn't use it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 1st August 2014 - 03:47 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.