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New Horizons Trajectory
hal_9000
post Jan 23 2006, 07:00 PM
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Correct link -> geocities.yahoo.com.br/hydraa16/Universe.zip

select "New" wink.gif
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hal_9000
post Jan 23 2006, 10:56 PM
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NEW LINK -> http://icez.org:81/Universe.zip

You can try to use Orsa 0.6.1.. i used it to do this file.. wink.gif

That other link was flooded..

Thanks for icez! biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
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hal_9000
post Jan 24 2006, 08:00 AM
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A full animation here.. smile.gif

You can play it on RealPlayer..

geocities.yahoo.com.br/hydraa16/videoNH.zip
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 24 2006, 07:46 PM
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Thanks for pointing that link out HAL 9000 wink.gif
However Realplayer needs an update to play the .ogg file ... any suggestions ?

I brought up the JPL simulator and I know it's a non-JPL mission but they (NASA) should include NH anyway ! tongue.gif
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hal_9000
post Jan 24 2006, 09:45 PM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Jan 24 2006, 04:46 PM)
Thanks for pointing that link out HAL 9000  wink.gif
However Realplayer needs an update to play the .ogg file ... any suggestions ?

I brought up the JPL simulator and I know it's a non-JPL mission but they (NASA) should include NH anyway !  tongue.gif
*


I uploaded it on RapidShare.de.. rolleyes.gif

The link is:

http://rapidshare.de/files/11757657/NEWNEWHORIZONS.mpg.html

wink.gif
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hal_9000
post Jan 25 2006, 12:24 AM
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You can track NH s/c on Orsa 0.7.0 (at least on my nix it works..)

Here is my "universe file" MRO and NH are included... biggrin.gif


http://rapidshare.de/files/11765507/Univer...hMRONH.zip.html
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punkboi
post Jan 30 2006, 06:37 PM
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Where is New Horizons?

smile.gif


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 30 2006, 08:22 PM
Post #23





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Still can't play the .mpg after download from Rapidshare ? wacko.gif
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Dave Bowman
post Jan 31 2006, 12:48 AM
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NH Location

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/whereis_nh.php
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SpaceCat
post Jun 27 2008, 08:30 PM
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Ultimate Trajectory Question:

Will NH leave the solar system and continue outbound as Pioneer & Voyger have--- or eventually end up in a long 'comet-type' elipse around the sun?

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ugordan
post Jun 27 2008, 08:31 PM
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That baby's never coming back.


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Greg Hullender
post Jun 28 2008, 04:12 AM
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QUOTE (SpaceCat @ Jun 27 2008, 01:30 PM) *
Will NH leave the solar system and continue outbound as Pioneer & Voyger have--- or eventually end up in a long 'comet-type' elipse around the sun?


Using the current positon and velocity from the "where is NH" page:

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/whereis_nh.php

And the standard gravitational parameter for the Sun, from Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_grav...ional_parameter

We can figure the "hyperbolic excess" (the velocity at infinity) which I estimate at 12.7 kps.

Or, in other words, "that baby's never coming back!"

--Greg :-)

This page has some other interesting equations:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbolic_trajectory

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brellis
post Jun 28 2008, 04:27 AM
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Questions come to my feeble mind: how does the trajectory of the Sun around the Milky Way play into the escape velocities of spacecraft like the Voyagers, Pioneers and NH? At what point would it figure into the equation?
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dmuller
post Jun 28 2008, 04:40 AM
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QUOTE (brellis @ Jun 28 2008, 02:27 PM) *
Questions come to my feeble mind: how does the trajectory of the Sun around the Milky Way play into the escape velocities of spacecraft like the Voyagers, Pioneers and NH? At what point would it figure into the equation?

No. At launch, every spacecraft already has the orbital velocity of the Sun around the Milky Way center. Similar to leaving Earth orbit: the escape speed is the same regardless of which direction (towards [like Venus Express] or away [New Horizons] from the Sun) you launch your spacecraft out of the Earth parking orbit.

However, if you want to leave the Milky Way, then it comes into play as you'd launch a spacecraft in the direction of the Sun's movement to make full use of its orbital speed. Also, if you fly in the direction of the Sun's movement, then you'll reach the bow shock and other solar system border areas sooner (because they're closer to the Sun there).


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dmuller
post Jun 28 2008, 04:47 AM
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QUOTE (Greg Hullender @ Jun 28 2008, 02:12 PM) *
Using the current positon and velocity from the "where is NH" page ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_grav...ional_parameter ... We can figure the "hyperbolic excess" (the velocity at infinity) which I estimate at 12.7 kps.

I have used the same wikipedia page and orbital information from the SSD Horizons System to calculate the hyperbolic excess for all 5 probes at http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=112578
16.6 km/s - Voyager 1
14.9 km/s - Voyager 2
12.5 km/s - New Horizons
11.3 km/s - Pioneer 10
10.4 km/s - Pioneer 11

Of course the value for New Horizons will change (a little) due to the Pluto flyby and KBO targeting maneuvers



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