IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

11 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
NH at Jupiter, Planning the Jupiter encounter
john_s
post Jan 22 2006, 10:57 PM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



I think the Jupiter encounter deserves its own thread.

I've just been taking a first look at the Jupiter encounter geometry. You can do the same using Mark Showalter's excellent on-line ephemeris tools at the PDS rings node, which by good fortune happens to include a New Horizons ephemeris (calculated over a year ago) for our actual launch date, January 19th. We'll have an updated ephemeris soon, but this one's already good enough for planning. As Roby72 noted in the Star 48 thread, the satellites are (annoyingly) all on the opposite side of Jupiter at closest approach. We'll still get good views of all sides of Io because Io rotates in only 1.8 days and we'll be pretty close to Jupiter for that long. We'll get fairly good coverage on Europa too, for the same reason. But we won't get very close to Ganymede or Callisto. Luckily Io is our highest priority satellite target and Europa is next, so we'll do OK.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
David
post Jan 22 2006, 11:16 PM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 809
Joined: 11-March 04
Member No.: 56



QUOTE (john_s @ Jan 22 2006, 10:57 PM)
I think the Jupiter encounter deserves its own thread.

*


I think it does too, but couldn't it go under, well, Jupiter?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Jan 23 2006, 12:00 AM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



QUOTE (David @ Jan 22 2006, 11:16 PM)
I think it does too, but couldn't it go under, well, Jupiter?
*


Nah, IMHO New Horizons discussions should stay under the New Horizons topic.

John.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Roby72
post Jan 23 2006, 12:28 AM
Post #4


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 83
Joined: 26-June 04
From: Austria
Member No.: 89



John,

yes the day before (or after), Io must be on the right side of the planet, but I think the high speed of NH makes the distance about equal than on encounter day at the other side (about 2.5 Mio km). Resolution for LORRI (bw imager) should be about 12 km, for RALPH (color) about 50km) This would be nice for plume searching and is about 5 times more resolution in case of LORRI than Cassini had at its Jupiter encounter in Dec. 2000.

Robert
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jan 23 2006, 12:44 AM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



Any chance NH could image Europa well enough to see if any surface features have changed/moved since Galileo?


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Jan 23 2006, 01:40 AM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 23 2006, 12:44 AM)
Any chance NH could image Europa well enough to see if any surface features have changed/moved since Galileo?
*


We'll be looking at Europa but not specifically for that purpose- our images will be far lower resolution than Voyager's and no changes were seen between Voyager and Galileo even at Voyager resolution, and over a longer timespan than between Galileo and NH. Our main goal in imaging Europa will be to look at the peculiar large, shallow, depressions that were seen by Galileo near the terminator- it's one area where we can improve over Galileo. Plus we'll be observing Europa's auroral emissions in Jupiter eclipse.

By the way, here's a table I just sent to the science team, showing the timing and geometry of various significant events during the encounter. Times are spacecraft times, and the numbers will change just a bit once we get a final ephemeris. I've only calculated the times of the eclipses of each satellite that occur closest to the spacecraft- there are many more at greater ranges. "UT" means Universal Time, "mrad" means the angular diameter in milliradians, and "Sub-S/C Lon" means the sub-spacecraft longitude. I couldn't figure out how to align the columns properly without replacing all the spaces with underscores...


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________Range___Diam__Solar__Sub-
____Date_______UT___(km)___(mrad)_Phase_S/C_Lon__Event
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
February_25__09:45_6334186__0.831___11____349____Ganymede eclipse ingress
February_25__11:45_6222615__0.846___12____352____Ganymede eclipse egress
February_27__10:46_3074450__1.021___40____315____Europa eclipse ingress
February_27__13:18_3045261__1.030___45____321____Europa eclipse egress
February_27__14:20_2734370__1.331___48____303____Io Eclipse ingress
February_27__16:28_2758131__1.320___53____316____Io Eclipse egress
February_28__02:00_2957815__1.061___72____347____Europa closest approach
February_28__05:00_2304575_61.920___82___________Jupiter closest approach
February_28__06:00_3029556__1.737__102_____41____Ganymede closestapproach
February_28__06:30_4153289__1.156___81____353____Callisto closest approach
February_28__22:00_2260221__1.610__118____141____Io_closest approach
___March__1__08:48_2748816__1.324__120____231____Io_eclipse ingress
___March__1__10:58_2951842__1.233__121____248____Io_eclipse ingress
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


John.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jan 23 2006, 05:16 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



QUOTE (john_s @ Jan 22 2006, 08:40 PM)
We'll be looking at Europa but not specifically for that purpose- our images will be far lower resolution than Voyager's and no changes were seen between Voyager and Galileo even at Voyager resolution, and over a longer timespan than between Galileo and NH.  Our main goal in imaging Europa will be to look at the peculiar large, shallow, depressions that were seen by Galileo near the terminator- it's one area where we can improve over Galileo.  Plus we'll be observing Europa's auroral emissions in Jupiter eclipse.

John.
*


Thank you for the information, John. Would New Horizons be able to look for any possible geysers from Europa as well? Might be good practice for similar events in the Pluto system, too.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Jan 23 2006, 10:56 PM
Post #8


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1164
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 23 2006, 12:16 PM)
Thank you for the information, John.  Would New Horizons be able to look for any possible geysers from Europa as well?  Might be good practice for similar events in the Pluto system, too.
*

Especially if Triton is supposed to be a lot like Pluto.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_Sunspot_*
post Jan 23 2006, 11:50 PM
Post #9





Guests






How many days/weeks before closest approach will New Horizons start imaging Jupiter? smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Jan 23 2006, 11:55 PM
Post #10





Guests






QUOTE (john_s @ Jan 22 2006, 10:57 PM)
I think the Jupiter encounter deserves its own thread.

I've just been taking a first look at the Jupiter encounter geometry.
Maybe I missed it in another thread (or website), John, but is there any possibility of getting imagery of any of the outer jovians (e.g., Himalia)?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Jan 24 2006, 02:11 AM
Post #11





Guests






Judging from the NH Jupiter encounter planning meeting I attended back at the 2003 DPS meeting, the most interesting piece of new information that comes out of the NH Jupiter flyby may be its near-IR spectra of the surface composition of the Galilean moons -- especially Europa. Its spectrometer has much higher spectral resolution than Galileo's and will be considerably closer to the Galilean moons that Cassini's, implying that it may be able to nail down whether that stuff mixed with Europa's ice is Mg sulfate or sulfuric acid.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Jan 24 2006, 09:45 PM
Post #12


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



QUOTE (AlexBlackwell @ Jan 23 2006, 11:55 PM)
Maybe I missed it in another thread (or website), John, but is there any possibility of getting imagery of any of the outer jovians (e.g., Himalia)?
*


We typically get a couple of pixels on Himalia, similar to Cassini, though I haven't seen the geometry for the actual trajectory yet. Anyway, don't expect anything too dramatic on any outer satellties.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bart
post Jan 25 2006, 12:11 AM
Post #13


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 48
Joined: 8-December 05
Member No.: 603



On an extremely amateur basis, I did some (very) back of the envelope calculations and came up with Himalia spanning about 9.5 pixels a week after Jupiter C/A - slightly better than Cassini.

Can't wait to hear real numbers from people who actually know in a couple of weeks.

Bart
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Steffen
post Jan 26 2006, 07:26 AM
Post #14


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 72
Joined: 22-December 05
Member No.: 616



So New Horizons will take images of the Gas giant Jupiter and some of its moons?
Wondered if the lenses on the cameras are closed afterwards as some kind of protection and opened before Pluto encounter? blink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Jan 26 2006, 05:57 PM
Post #15


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



* ASTRONOTES: Derelict Booster to Beat Pluto Probe to Jupiter

http://www.space.com/astronotes/astronotes.html

NASA's Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft now speeding through the Solar System
is set to reach Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007, but it will not be the first craft of
its mission to reach the gas giant, mission officials said this week.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

11 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 30th July 2014 - 05:13 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.