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The Return Of The Plume From The Crater
fallofrain
post Feb 23 2006, 12:52 AM
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Please forgive me everyone if you think I'm flogging a dead horse. I made a request to have the area of the "plume" re-imaged. That was many months ago. I haven't heard anything, so I'm assuming it was denied. I really wasn't expecting it. Here's the link to the MOC image in question...

http://www.msss.com/moc_gallery/r16_r21/im...8/R1801150.html

I recently acquired some image generating software and tried running a cropped portion of the MOC image through it. It generated a different perspective which I found interesting. I'm not certain anyone else will, but thought I'd submit it. The vertical exaggeration is pretty horrible. I haven't figured out how to control that yet. I know this proves absolutely nothing, but I hope you find it interesting. The attachment is the image shown below without the text. The view is from the southwest.

Thanks,
Terry

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djellison
post Feb 23 2006, 08:57 AM
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The correct link is http://www.msss.com/moc_gallery/r16_r21/im...8/R1801150.html (perhaps you copied it from a different forum post? )

FWIW - i dont see plumes - I see topology on the surace, but it's a matter of interpretation.

Doug
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SteveM
post Feb 23 2006, 02:34 PM
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QUOTE (fallofrain @ Feb 22 2006, 07:52 PM) *
...
I recently acquired some image generating software and tried running a cropped portion of the MOC image through it. It generated a different perspective which I found interesting....


The processed image is hard to interpret without knowing a bit more about what this unnamed image generating software does. What are the peaks and valleys supposed to represent? Are they dark and bright spots on the original image or is there some more sophisticated modeling involved?

Steve
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fallofrain
post Feb 23 2006, 04:16 PM
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The modeling program is called Bryce. It is by no means a valid interpretation tool, and I never meant to imply that. I am submitting it only to show relative heights of surface features. It was designed to create imaginary digital landscapes, but it can also make reasonably accurate landscapes from digital elevation models or less accurate ones from aerial photos. From aerial (or satellite) photos it assigns elevation according to pixel brightness. The brighter the pixel, the higher the elevation. Vertical exaggeration creates the many spikes in the image. It IS all a matter of interpretation, but the area I consider to be a plume seems to rise in a wedge shape from the crater center, while nearby ejecta rays are comparatively flat. Also, what I interpret as the plume's shadow is dark, and appears as a negative elevation. The "plume" appears as a wedge shape because the software cannot know what is under the plume from what is seen in the photo. It considers it a solid object connected to the ground (something I suspect most of you do, too).

The area around the plume crater is interesting, too. It appears to be a sink or slumped area with an outlet channel at the southeast edge.

Please take this for what you think it's worth. I'm only using the few tools I have available to me to make a case, and I'm presenting it in an informal manner. If I'm wrong, the universe isn't going to change. If I'm right, it could be somewhat significant. If you feel it's flawed, please just ignore it.

Thanks,
Terry
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fallofrain
post Apr 26 2006, 02:47 AM
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For those who might be interested...I'll be submitting this as a HiRise Observation Request when the program opens later this summer. Thanks for your opinions, everybody.
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fallofrain
post May 25 2006, 02:51 AM
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I've noticed that there is still some interest in this and my previous posting. I'd like to encourage readers to make additional comments if they wish. Thanks.

Terry
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fallofrain
post Aug 26 2006, 01:35 AM
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Here's something new, for what it's worth... I located a more recent Themis image of the area of the crater with the "plume," and the depression in which it is located. It's much smaller scale, so interpret it as you wish. The Themis image is I14551005. I am using the image from Google Mars that includes I14551005 to show the surrounding area. I've searched the area and can find no other depressed area that matches the one in the "plume" image. The image showing the plume is MOC R18-01150, and was photographed 14 June 2004. The Themis image was photographed about nine months later...26 March 2005. The footprint also agrees closely with the index map on the MSSS web site. If I've identified the depression correctly, there appears now to be a mound or dome in the crater, and a flow of some kind breaching the wall of the southeast quarter of the depression.

On the attached photo, I've shrunk the MOC image to approximately the scale of the Themis image. Inset "A" is a crop of the original MOC photo. Inset "B" is a larger crop reduced to the Themis image scale. Since the images were shot from different orbits, in Inset "C" I've taken the liberty of adjusting the MOC image slightly to align surface features. The general outline of the depression, the strike of the highlands to the northeast, and the rim of a crater about 5km south of the depression align closely with the Themis image. It's unclear if the southern area matches. The adjustment, for what it's worth, was done using Photoshop. The only change was the keystoning effect.

If I've identified the wrong depression, I'd be delighted if someone could find the correct one. It should be within about 10km of this one.

So what is it? My original guess was a geyser-like plume. I don't think that any more. So maybe a volcanic eruption with lava flow...a trick of the light...or a misidentified area? It's open to debate again.

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f149/onc...e/kiki9aaaa.jpg
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