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First HiRISE Images Coming Soon!, test images to be taken week of March 20
Guest_paulanderson_*
post Mar 7 2006, 07:37 AM
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Here's hoping for a safe orbital entry...

Powerful Orbiting Camera Will Send Its First View of Mars to UA Soon
http://uanews.org/cgi-bin/WebObjects/UANew...ArticleID=12261

"HiRISE scientists will power the HiRISE camera the week of March 20. It will begin taking pictures 18 hours later, and it will take pictures during two orbits. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory mission specialists will decide exactly which orbits will be HiRISE imaging orbits after Mars orbit insertion on March 10.

These will be the camera's only photos for the next six months because it will be turned off while the spacecraft "aerobrakes." This involves dipping repeatedly into the upper atmosphere to scrub off speed and drop into successively more circular orbits.

The camera will take pictures of the middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere, a region where many geologically recent gullies have been seen, gullies possibly carved by water. Researchers won't know the exact area they'll photograph until the spacecraft is safely captured into orbit around Mars.

The camera's first images will be taken when the MRO is flying between about 2,500 miles and 600 miles (4,000 km and 1,000 km) above the planet. After aerobraking, the camera will fly just outside the planet's atmosphere at only 190 miles (about 300 km) above the surface."
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jmknapp
post Mar 8 2006, 04:15 PM
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QUOTE (paulanderson @ Mar 7 2006, 02:37 AM) *
[i]"HiRISE scientists will power the HiRISE camera the week of March 20. It will begin taking pictures 18 hours later, and it will take pictures during two orbits. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory mission specialists will decide exactly which orbits will be HiRISE imaging orbits after Mars orbit insertion on March 10.


March 20th? These plans are evidently in flux. The press release on the MRO website states:

QUOTE
The three cameras from the science payload -- the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, the Context
Camera, and the Mars Color Imager -- will take their first test images of Mars as the orbiter passes low over the southern hemisphere near the end of the third orbit, on March 14... Late in the fourth orbit, on March 16, a jitter test will be conducted to determine whether image quality is affected by operating motors of other instruments at the same time the high-resolution camera is taking an image.


I suppose the new plan was covered in the press conference yesterday?


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djellison
post Mar 8 2006, 04:23 PM
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There's a conf at 1800 UT tonight, I'll listen in and see if anything's mentioned.

Doug
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jmknapp
post Mar 8 2006, 04:39 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Mar 8 2006, 11:23 AM) *
There's a conf at 1800 UT tonight, I'll listen in and see if anything's mentioned.

Doug


Oh, I was thinking the conference was yesterday... thanks. smile.gif


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crabbsaline
post Mar 11 2006, 03:43 AM
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I've been watching the MOI from work today (and don't you know it, everything goes wrong here when the broadcast is in full swing blink.gif ). Anyway, I suppose the next big thing to look for is this test of the three cameras, eh?

I didn't notice any more info about the exact date on the conference thread. Any news? I'm itching to see a HiRise image.

Joe, do you have a link to the press release that you quoted?

----crabbsaline

PS: This Arizona Republic article shows the date as post-19th:

QUOTE
The powerful camera will shoot its first photographs after March 19, while the craft is 2,500 miles to 600 miles above Mars. Then, HiRISE will hibernate for six months while the spacecraft drops into an orbit about 190 miles above the planet.


edit: Never mind, Joe. I found the source. (page 28).
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Steve G
post Mar 11 2006, 07:13 PM
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A pity JPL won't try and get a shot of opportinty of negected Deimos.
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mcaplinger
post Mar 11 2006, 07:32 PM
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The current schedule shows the imaging happening on 3/22, but I'm not sure when the downlinking of the images will be finished, and there's still some schedule uncertainty depending on how the transition into orbital operations proceeds. It'll probably be better nailed down by the end of this week.


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 11 2006, 10:39 PM
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Steve G said "A pity JPL won't try and get a shot of opportinty of negected Deimos."

Good point. Many folks don't appreciate how neglected it is. Our imaging coverage is very limited. The best images, which are very few, are all of one side. Most of the trailing side is seen in only one (yes, one... so not even stereo) high phase image. Anything new would be great. The highest priority ought to be the trailing side under different illumination conditions, to show topography better. That would allow a study of the relationship between the largest array of bright streaks and the otherwise completely unknown topography.

MOC took nice images of Phobos early in the mission during several close passes. After that I assumed there would be no more, but I was pleased to see an image taken later when Phobos was just over the limb of Mars. If that feat could be duplicated for Deimos we could get significant new information, despite the low resolution. And certainly a glimpse from MRO would be a real treat.

Of course, JPL is not in charge of HIRISE. Our buddies in Tucson would have to take care of that.

Phil


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mcaplinger
post Mar 12 2006, 01:32 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 11 2006, 02:39 PM) *
If that feat could be duplicated for Deimos we could get significant new information, despite the low resolution.

We've thought about doing Deimos imaging with MOC, but the resolution possible from the mapping orbit is pretty bad; about 82 m/pxl at the closest approaches, and poorer that that for the ones where we wouldn't be shooting into the sun. But we can think about it again; if you can work out when and where we would improve the coverage over Viking that would help to sell it.


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jmknapp
post Mar 12 2006, 03:27 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Mar 11 2006, 08:32 PM) *
But we can think about it again; if you can work out when and where we would improve the coverage over Viking that would help to sell it.


Do you mean with MRO? Not sure if the latest kernels are accurate, but using
spk_ab_ref060307_060310_060706_p-v1.bsp gives a closest approach to Deimos of 10,083 km on March 13 at 18:48 UTC. Something like 7/10000 = 700 uradians or 700 pixels across--10 m/pixel. How would that compare to Viking?


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mcaplinger
post Mar 12 2006, 03:41 AM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Mar 11 2006, 07:27 PM) *
Do you mean with MRO?

No. It's a lot easier for us to do this sort of stuff with MGS than it'll be with MRO; during aerobraking they're not going to perform imaging slews. (It was only the long suspension of aerobraking on MGS due to the SA damper problem that allowed the first MOC Phobos images to be done.) And I suspect it'll be a long time after MRO has gotten into mapping before they start doing stuff like slewing to image the moons.


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 12 2006, 04:57 AM
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Mariner 9 never saw the trailing side of Deimos. Viking saw it in only one single image (with a second over-exposed). Absolutely anything that shows the trailing side will give new information. If several views could be obtained at different Ls the varying terminator positions and relief seen with different lighting would really help enlarge our understanding of Deimos, especially the interaction between the relief and the bright streaks. There would be no value in seeing the leading side. Mars Express has a few lower resolution images of the leading side so far, but MOC should be better.

Phil


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jmknapp
post Mar 12 2006, 02:35 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 11 2006, 11:57 PM) *
Absolutely anything that shows the trailing side will give new information. If several views could be obtained at different Ls the varying terminator positions and relief seen with different lighting would really help enlarge our understanding of Deimos, especially the interaction between the relief and the bright streaks. There would be no value in seeing the leading side. Mars Express has a few lower resolution images of the leading side so far, but MOC should be better.


With MGS's orbit being so tight around Mars compared to Deimos' orbit, seems like MGS would see not much more than the Mars-facing side of Deimos, no? For the trailing side that would place 90E-180E out of sight. Or more accurately the MGS subpoint might get to 6E best case. Here's one view coming up in a few days (15MAR2006 15:00 UTC), with the subpoint at 5E, range 22863 km, using your cylindrical mosaic with the trailing side tinted red, modeled as a tri-axial ellipsoid:



At that range the narrow angle resolution would be 77 m/pixel.


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 12 2006, 04:25 PM
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Very nice! But the real 3-D shape would allow a better view than the ellipsoid suggests, as that side appears to be flattened more than this triaxial ellipsoid. And the true shape of the limb at right is unknown. That if nothing else would be a new input to the shape model. This image shows nicely where the cut-off of high resolution imaging falls, not far east of the prime meridian. Then we have a strip about 40 degrees wide of low quality imaging based on just two very early Viking images, and then the outer strip based on only one high phase view. With good lighting we would still learn something new about this region.

By a happy coincidence your simulation date of 15 March is my birthday. I'll take this as a birthday card!

Phil


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jmknapp
post Mar 12 2006, 05:37 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 12 2006, 11:25 AM) *
With good lighting we would still learn something new about this region... I'll take this as a birthday card!

Phil


Enceladus demonstrates that great things can come in little packages. cool.gif


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