IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

36 Pages V  « < 16 17 18 19 20 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Juno - Jupiter Orbiter
Paolo
post Mar 26 2011, 02:37 PM
Post #256


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1356
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



There were 2 very well done articles on Juno in last week's Aviation Week
this is the only one of the two I found on their website: Juno Is Solar Marvel Bound for Jupiter
by the way, you can read them both by searching Aviation Week on www.zinio.com


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Mar 28 2011, 06:35 PM
Post #257


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



Juno's solar arrays are already at Cape Canaveral, undergoing tests. Juno itself should be arriving in Florida sometime next month, I believe
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
belleraphon1
post Apr 8 2011, 11:12 AM
Post #258


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 732
Joined: 29-December 05
From: NE Oh, USA
Member No.: 627



Follow Juno's high-flying journey to Cape Canaveral Today, Friday 04/08/11

"Ever wonder what it's like to transport delicate billion-dollar space equipment across the country? It takes precision, care and a little heavy-lifting from the Air Force. NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly to Florida on a C-17 Globemaster today to start preparing for launch to Jupiter in August, and Spaceflight Now is going along for the ride."

http://spaceflightnow.com/juno/status.html

blatant political comment removed - admin

Craig
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Apr 8 2011, 11:03 PM
Post #259


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 932
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



They're in motion, according to the status.

Looks like they'll make it just in time!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Apr 9 2011, 02:14 AM
Post #260


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



NASA's Jupiter-Bound Spacecraft Arrives in Florida

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?rele...elease_2011-113


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post May 5 2011, 01:38 AM
Post #261


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



High Gain Antenna now attached to Juno
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image
 


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post May 17 2011, 12:26 AM
Post #262


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1506
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



The Junocam has been delivered:

http://www.msss.com/news/index.php?id=24

And there are some interesting tidbits there, for instance

QUOTE
...is designed to take hundreds of color images of the giant planet, some at resolutions never before seen...


and

QUOTE
Junocam uses precision bandpass filters produced by Barr Associates of Westford, Massachusetts, including a red channel that sees into the near infrared to penetrate more deeply into the jovian atmosphere, and a fourth narrowband near-IR channel to map the abundance of methane


I was starting to fear that the best Voyager mosaics of the Great Red Spot (GRS) were going to remain the best (or at least among the very best) views of the GRS for the next 20-25 years or more but fortunately it now at least seems possible I was wrong.

There are lots of thing I'd love to see at significantly higher resolution than Voyager obtained (for example hi-res time lapse coverage of selected features like the GRS; cloud shadows and vertical 'relief' etc. that is visible in the highest resolution Voyager images) but I don't know if this qualifies as something that is interesting enough from a scientific point of view.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post May 17 2011, 05:18 AM
Post #263


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4463
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



I'm glad they finally said this publicly:
QUOTE
Its wide-angle lens, designed and built by Rockwell-Collins Optronics of Carlsbad, California, produces sharp, low-distortion images that rival the best MSSS cameras have ever taken.

MSSS people seem just giddy about the quality of the images they're getting from this camera. And not only that: the compression algorithms they're using result in so little a reduction in image quality that probably only Bjorn and Gordan will notice the compression artifacts smile.gif I'm still not quite sure what to expect from this mission in terms of images, but I'm quite confident it'll be much more spectacular than is officially promised.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Jun 29 2011, 12:04 AM
Post #264


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1506
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



Planetary Radio had an interview with Scott Bolton yesterday. One of the highlights: The images will be released to the web in raw form as soon as they are received. The best resolution is going to be 3 km/pixel.

If I understand correctly Juno will mainly be doing polar imaging (or the resolution is optimal there - I'm not sure). It would be interesting to know more about this and especially about possible imaging of the latitudes about 20 degrees south of the equator smile.gif.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hendric
post Jun 29 2011, 04:51 PM
Post #265


Director of Galilean Photography
***

Group: Members
Posts: 713
Joined: 15-July 04
From: Austin, TX
Member No.: 93



I sent a thank you note to the team via http://missionjuno.swri.edu/
Couldn't hurt if more did the same!
Just FYI, there is some kind of character limit in their "contact us" window, so be succinct. smile.gif


--------------------
Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
--
"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MarcF
post Jul 8 2011, 03:37 PM
Post #266


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 180
Joined: 16-May 06
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Member No.: 773



Juno is almost ready to fly smile.gif

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/...10707154500.htm
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
peter59
post Jul 26 2011, 06:54 PM
Post #267


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 20-April 05
From: Poland
Member No.: 299



Amazing how low is interest in the Juno mission. I know that Juno is not Cassini, but nevertheless it is mission to Jupiter.
Here is a series of really beautiful images from KSC (including encapsulation).
http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=230
Launch window opens Aug. 5 (only 9 days, 20 hours from now). biggrin.gif


--------------------
Free software for planetary science (including Cassini Image Viewer).
http://members.tripod.com/petermasek/marinerall.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Jul 26 2011, 07:04 PM
Post #268


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



QUOTE (peter59 @ Jul 26 2011, 11:54 AM) *
Amazing how low is interest in the Juno mission.


Possibly because it's only designed to last 33 months at Jupiter...as opposed to 7 years and counting for Cassini at Saturn wink.gif

(That, and there are only so many interesting images the Junocam can take of Jupiter's poles)


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Jul 26 2011, 07:08 PM
Post #269


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 932
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



The destination is still so far away, its like wondering why there's not much fuss about Rosetta or New Horizons yet.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jul 26 2011, 07:34 PM
Post #270


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13799
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



QUOTE (peter59 @ Jul 26 2011, 11:54 AM) *
it is mission to Jupiter.


And gets there 5 years from now. What is there to be excited about right now?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

36 Pages V  « < 16 17 18 19 20 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st October 2014 - 08:42 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.