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Winter Quarters, at Low Ridge Haven
climber
post Jun 10 2006, 09:25 PM
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[i][quote name='ustrax' date='Jun 8 2006, 12:51 PM' post='57535']
A bit off topic but here it goes...[/i


You're not off topic ustrax. We (and JPL) very often use names of people, boats, locations, that can be find in everybody's memory. Generaly, names come from the past or old ages. In this case, this is fresh memory and those courageous men and women deserve that we remember that there are some places (on Mars) that are not "only" places. I wish I'd better english to write what I realy feel.


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Bob Shaw
post Jun 10 2006, 09:35 PM
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QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Jun 7 2006, 07:41 AM) *
Your wish is my command Bob smile.gif

This is the first anaglyph i've ever attempted so comments for improvement are more than welcome. The right eye pan is also far from perfect, a very preliminary attempt.

But at least it *does* seem to work blink.gif smile.gif pancam.gif

James


James:

Nice planet. I'll take it!

Bob Shaw


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mhoward
post Jun 11 2006, 05:42 PM
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A couple columns of the McMurdo pan in false-color:

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helvick
post Jun 11 2006, 05:50 PM
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QUOTE (mhoward @ Jun 11 2006, 06:42 PM) *
A couple columns of the McMurdo pan in false-color:

Oh very sweet.
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Guest_paulanderson_*
post Jun 11 2006, 06:37 PM
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Interesting "raised curved ridges" in the soil, lower right of image (June 9):

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/spirit/pa...00P2297L5M1.JPG

Note also the adjacent soil crack. Any ideas from the geologists here?
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CosmicRocker
post Jun 12 2006, 04:14 AM
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I hadn't noticed this before. The movement threw me for a loop as I scanned through the sol 867 pancams earlier, but then I realized it was only the HGA pivoting past the color target as the pancam was taking the right filter images of the target. This animated gif is the sequence from R1 through R7.

Now, I don't understand how seven 12KB images adds up to a 500+ KB animated gif. It seems that there must be a lot of useless information in that file, but it works. If anyone has any tips regarding how to better optimize the file size of animated gifs, I'm all ears.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


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fredk
post Jun 12 2006, 04:44 AM
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That 12kB per frame is for (lossy) compressed jpegs. The gifs in each frame of the animation are compressed too, but losslessly, so they take up 80kB or so per frame, or 500kB or so in total.

So yeah, you're taking 12kB worth of real info per frame and storing it as 80, so most of the gif file size is taken up with redundancy and jpeg artifacts. To get the animation file size down you need to go to some lossy compression format, such as avi or mpeg.
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CosmicRocker
post Jun 12 2006, 05:04 AM
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Thanks. That makes a lot of sense.


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djellison
post Jun 12 2006, 07:38 AM
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Not sure how many options for GIF saving you have, but you can do things like reduce the bit depth to say, 64 colours - that helps a lot.

Doug
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ustrax
post Jun 12 2006, 08:38 AM
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QUOTE (mhoward @ Jun 11 2006, 06:42 PM) *
A couple columns of the McMurdo pan in false-color:


I just loved that! smile.gif


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climber
post Jun 12 2006, 08:57 AM
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[quote name='ustrax' date='Jun 12 2006, 10:38 AM' post='58047']
I just loved that! smile.gif


So do I.
Realy


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Aberdeenastro
post Jun 12 2006, 11:56 AM
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QUOTE (paulanderson @ Jun 11 2006, 07:37 PM) *
Interesting "raised curved ridges" in the soil, lower right of image (June 9):

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/spirit/pa...00P2297L5M1.JPG

Note also the adjacent soil crack. Any ideas from the geologists here?


Those are really peculiar features and it will be interesting to see if they change over the coming months. The left hand crack lies between the rover wheel tracks and may have been caused by disturbance as the rover passed over, particularly if there is a hard salty crust on the surface. The ridges on the right are harder to explain. They look like sand-filled cracks that have hardened, followed by erosion of surrounding softer material. Or perhaps they are some remnant of older ripples.

Castor
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Jeff7
post Jun 12 2006, 12:16 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jun 12 2006, 12:44 AM) *
That 12kB per frame is for (lossy) compressed jpegs. The gifs in each frame of the animation are compressed too, but losslessly, so they take up 80kB or so per frame, or 500kB or so in total.

So yeah, you're taking 12kB worth of real info per frame and storing it as 80, so most of the gif file size is taken up with redundancy and jpeg artifacts. To get the animation file size down you need to go to some lossy compression format, such as avi or mpeg.


I used TMPGEnc to convert the animated GIF into a Huffyuv AVI file, which was 1MB. That's losslessly compressed though. Then used Virtualdub to make that into a 63.5KB XviD AVI file, and Ulead Videostudio to make a 174.4KB MPEG-1 file.

Enjoy. smile.gif
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CosmicRocker
post Jun 12 2006, 02:27 PM
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QUOTE (Castor @ Jun 12 2006, 06:56 AM) *
... Or perhaps they are some remnant of older ripples.

Castor
I like your second option best. As I look around, these things appear to be fairly numerous. They are much more abundant in this pancam of an area nearby, and in that context, they look just like eroded older ripples to me.


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atomoid
post Jun 12 2006, 06:10 PM
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QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Jun 12 2006, 02:27 PM) *
I like your second option best. As I look around, these things appear to be fairly numerous. They are much more abundant in this pancam of an area nearby, and in that context, they look just like eroded older ripples to me.
I live by the beach and see these kinds of features a lot, particularly in sands that have a lot of moisture just underneath the surface. There's a sand expert somewhere who knows how the terrestrial formations emerge, maybe they can chime in here. These martian sands seem thouroughly dry by all accounts as deep as the rover's wheels have dug..
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