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Chandrayaan 1, India's First Lunar Probe
elakdawalla
post Oct 22 2008, 01:40 AM
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Yeah, it looked like it launched directly into a cloud, but I did catch a glimpse of the rocket emerging briefly from cloud atop a pillar of fire -- that will be the money shot, if someone captured it.

Thanks again for the updates.

--Emily


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Phil Stooke
post Oct 22 2008, 01:41 AM
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Bhas, we are told the impact probe will hit the rim of Shackleton. Do you have any source that gives a precise target point, in coordinates or on an image?

Phil


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elakdawalla
post Oct 22 2008, 01:51 AM
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This site maintains a helpful list of links to news stories about the mission. The first post-launch news stories have just appeared.

--Emily


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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 03:18 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Oct 22 2008, 07:11 AM) *
Bhas, we are told the impact probe will hit the rim of Shackleton. Do you have any source that gives a precise target point, in coordinates or on an image?

Phil


I don't have. I will try though.
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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 03:22 AM
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Here is another picture of the mission.
Attached Image


NOTE: as Phil has pointed out the Launch vehicle shown here is that of GSLV. Rest of info. is all about Chandrayaan-I.
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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 03:27 AM
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Update from ISRO

Indian Space Research Organisation Chairman G Madhavan Nair described the successful launch as a historic moment in India's space programme.
"The launch was perfect and precise. The satellite has been placed in the earth orbit. With this, we have completed the first leg of the mission and it will take 15 days to reach the lunar orbit," Nair announced in the mission control centre shortly after PSLV-C11 put the spacecraft in a transfer orbit.

After circling the earth in its highly elliptical Transfer Orbit for a while, Chandrayaan-1 would be taken into more elliptical orbits by repeated firing of the spacecraft's Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) at opportune moments.
Subsequently, the LAM would be again fired to take the spacecraft to the vicinity of the moon by following a Lunar Transfer Trajectory (LTT) path, whose apogee lies at 3,87,000 km.

Later, when Chandrayaan-1 reaches the vicinity of the moon, its LAM would be fired again so as to slow down the spacecraft sufficiently to enable the gravity of the moon to capture it into an elliptical orbit. The next step would be to reduce the height of the spacecraft orbit around the moon in various steps.
After some more procedures, Chandrayaan-1's orbit would be finally lowered to its intended 100 km height from the lunar surface, which was expected to take place around November 8.

Later, the Moon Impact Probe would be ejected from Chandrayaan-1 in a chosen area following which the cameras and other payloads would be turned on and thoroughly tested, marking the operational phase of the mission.

"Fortunately, we had clear skies today and we would be completing the remaining part of the journey within 15 days," Nair said.
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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 03:45 AM
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After launch, action shifts to Bangalore centre

Once the launch is done at Sriharikota, Peenya in Bangalore will take over Chandrayaan-I the spacecraft and mission.

Hectic activity is on at the ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (Istrac) at Peenya, which will be the country's nerve-centre for tracking and controlling Chandrayaan-I for the next two years.

Peenya will receive the first signals from the spacecraft 17 minutes after take-off, when the fourth stage of the rocket separates and injects the spacecraft into Earth's orbit. From the 17th minute to the very last day of the spacecraft's life two years from now ISTRAC will be in command.

The Deep Space Network (DSN) at Byalalu will join ISTRAC in tracking the spacecraft six hours after take-off. Both DSN and ISTRAC will act as back-up stations for each other, with ISTRAC concentrating on the data flow from the spacecraft, and DSN helping in reception of the radio signals owing to its powerful 32-metre antenna. But ISTRAC will be the primary agency tracking the craft.

The control centre at ISTRAC has about 350 people monitoring the health of Indian satellites. While there are groups designated for specific satellites, any member from any group could be called upon to help with Chandrayaan.

On Tuesday, engineers at ISTRAC were busy running last-minute checks on simulators, communication links, quality of links, verifying operations of systems and testing for 100% accuracy in reception, flow and expression of data. ISTRAC deputy director Chiranjeevi said, "There is work every two-three seconds. We have to ensure that all systems are working to perfection."

Chiranjeevi said ISTRAC would receive the first signals from the spacecraft in the form of engineering units data on computers. "There will be hundreds of such units flowing in. We will check the units for voltage on the craft, temperature, power, battery strength, orbit determination and orientation, fuel and general health of the spacecraft."

He said engineers will work in shifts to monitor Chandrayaan every minute for the next two years. "They sit in front of the computers and look at data flow based on which control commands are operated. But there are 2,000 parameters to check on and it would be humanly impossible to get engineers to monitor every one of them. So we have automatic software systems in place that will immediately alert us to any change in operations and sequence," Chiranjeevi explained.

"We can't get anything wrong. We have been maintaining satellites for the last 20 years and it would be the same with Chandrayaan," he added.
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MizarKey
post Oct 22 2008, 05:51 AM
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I checked Heaven's Above but it didn't have any info on seeing Chandrayaan 1, does anyone know if it will be visible over North America?


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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 06:45 AM
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Some snaps of Launch

Attached Image

Attached Image

Attached Image

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ustrax
post Oct 22 2008, 06:48 AM
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बधाई भारत के लिए इस उपलब्धि पर!

Not bad at Portuguese public channel news coverage...Chandrayaan I arrived right after Champions League and global economic crisis. smile.gif
Clean and with no mistakes, with a focus on Helium-3.


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Rakhir
post Oct 22 2008, 06:51 AM
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QUOTE (Bhas_From_India @ Oct 22 2008, 07:45 AM) *
Some snaps of Launch
Attached Image

Hi Bhas,

your first picture seems to be a night Sea Launch huh.gif
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Oct 22 2008, 07:08 AM
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Excellent replies, nice videos by Doug !
Good report by BBC huh.gif

Anyway, I would like to have some book info:
Destination Moon by Pallava Bagla (India)

Does it describe Chandrayaan-1 and -2?
Does anybody have ISBN number?
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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 08:26 AM
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QUOTE (Rakhir @ Oct 22 2008, 12:21 PM) *
Hi Bhas,

your first picture seems to be a night Sea Launch huh.gif


Removed it. - Thanks for pointing out. :-(
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Bhas_From_India
post Oct 22 2008, 08:30 AM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Oct 22 2008, 12:38 PM) *
Excellent replies, nice videos by Doug !
Good report by BBC huh.gif

Anyway, I would like to have some book info:
Destination Moon by Pallava Bagla (India)

Does it describe Chandrayaan-1 and -2?
Does anybody have ISBN number?


Details about book:
Title : Destination Moon [ : India's Quest for the Moon, Mars and Beyond ]
Author: Pallava Bagla
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9788172236762
Seller: Indus International
Price : 195 Rupees [ about 4$ ]

" The book tells the story of India's moon mission right from its conception to launch.
It also sheds light on India's maiden moon craft, Chandrayaan-1 which will seek to unravel the mysteries
of the earth's closest neighbour that is still an enigma. "
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mps
post Oct 22 2008, 09:03 AM
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For those who like compare numbers (like I do), here is some data about recent/near future lunar probes:


s/c ; mass in lunar orbit ; lunar orbit ; imager resolution

SMART-1 ; 370 kg ; 2300 x 4500 km polar ; 80 m/pix
Kaguya ; 2885 kg ; 100 km polar ; 10 m/pix
Chang'e-1 ; ?* ; 200 km polar** ; 120 m/pix
Chandrayaan-1 ; 590 kg ; 100 km polar ; 5 m/pix
LRO ; 1823 kg ; 50 km polar ; 0.5 m/pix


* Chang'e-1 mass is according to Wikipedia 2350 kg, but I don't know if it is launch mass or mass in lunar orbit

** inclination ca 90 deg according to http://150.197.1.105:10000/KariWeb/fulltext1/05_1/515.pdf
but ca 64 deg according to Wikipedia

Sources:
presentations from LRO Project Science Working Group Meeting November 28, 2006 (sorry, can't find them online right now, but the link is somewhere in UMSF.com)
http://150.197.1.105:10000/KariWeb/fulltext1/05_1/515.pdf
Wikipedia
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