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Ideas on a future manned Mars
ustrax
post May 31 2006, 06:49 PM
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Are you awared of any psychological, philosophical, antropological studies on a future manned mission and possible settlement on Mars?

Basically, and this is a point I would like to be discussed and developed, I believe that the humans envolved in such quest will develop a sense of mission, evolving, as time goes by, in a kind of mystical experience, in spite of all the efforts developed to keep their minds occupied and executing their scientific work.
The fact of being the first ones, the fact of being the Primus in an alien world will originate an ambiguous feeling: the nostalgia of mother Earth, proud, fear, curiosity, exploration, survival...
In spite of being the executors of Humanity's most advanced technological saga, all the primitive, basic instincts will arise and, on that process, trying to understand the magnificence of their adventure, they're role on it, there are questions that will not be immediately answered and then, in order to fill in the gaps, the spirit will search, using external and internal references, one truth, that will, due to the never experienced nature of their condition, the only one.
But this is only my opinion, a pilgrim's one...
Any other?


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"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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ljk4-1
post Jun 1 2006, 07:42 PM
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As with most pioneers, the first generation will find their new homes
difficult to live in for many reasons. But no one on a colonizing mission
to other worlds will be doing so involuntarily. They will know the risks,
even if only in principle.

But the next generations will only know Mars or Alpha Centauri 5. Earth
will just be a story of a distant land where their ancestors grew up because
they couldn't go anywhere else until the 21st Century.

Humanity will always have some problems colonizing space, but homesickness
for Earth for our distant descendants won't be one of them.

Plus, many years down the road, they may also not quite be the same kind of
humans as we are. They may be purposefully adapted to live on their new worlds,
perhaps so much so that they could not even visit Earth if they wanted to.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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ustrax
post Jun 7 2006, 04:30 PM
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Just a quote from Mr. Carvalho Rodrigues, the 'father' of the 1st (and so far only) Portuguese sattelite:

'Whenever he is installed in a new place - nominated in his cabinet of NATO, in Brussels, where he occupies, since 1999, the position of director of the Science Project -, Carvalho Rodrigues takes with him a slate board, where he writes, with chalk, the ideias that occur to him. It can seem ironic, for who is accustomed to deal with top technology, but this is the man who believes that in the end, with all the voyages that we already made to space, we are only collecting information that will allow the draw of the maps for the Great Voyage. The Voyage that, tomorrow, we are going to make.

From here:
http://www.nationalgeographic.pt/revista/0...tos/default.asp


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"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
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