IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

10 Pages V  « < 2 3 4 5 6 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
MSL Video
tty
post Nov 23 2006, 06:56 PM
Post #46


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 683
Joined: 20-April 05
From: Sweden
Member No.: 273



QUOTE (helvick @ Nov 22 2006, 09:53 PM) *
The cord cutting event does look awfully risky when you see it on video but it's not significantly different to the risk associated with blowing the backshell\heatshield and the hundreds of other exquisitely choreographed events that are needed for any lander to get to the surface safely.


I agree. In Aerospace applications whenever You have a one-time event that absolutely has to work (typically escape or emergency systems) pyrotechnics are normally the system of choice. They are extremely reliable, degrade very slowly and act instantly.

tty
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
edstrick
post Nov 24 2006, 11:59 AM
Post #47


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1869
Joined: 20-February 05
Member No.: 174



they often have duplicate circuits for really critical pyrotechnics. Duplicate pyros, wiring, everything.

It's extraordinarily rare for pyros to fail to fire. Last time I remember that happening, they put one large sat on a ?Titan? built for two, and wired the spacecraft separation to the wrong pyro-lines. When the booster control sent the separation command, it went down the wires to the non-existent pyros to separate the nonexistant second sat.

That was the last one the Shuttle rescued before they stopped doing that sort of thing.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JTN
post Nov 25 2006, 01:22 AM
Post #48


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: 20-November 05
From: Mare Desiderii
Member No.: 563



It's going to be funny to look back and see rover tracks just starting from nowhere. Hadn't occurred to me before.
(I guess we might get a bit of a mark from the rockets?)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jeff7
post Nov 25 2006, 01:36 AM
Post #49


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 477
Joined: 2-March 05
Member No.: 180



QUOTE
The cord cutting event does look awfully risky when you see it on video but it's not significantly different to the risk associated with blowing the backshell\heatshield and the hundreds of other exquisitely choreographed events that are needed for any lander to get to the surface safely.

Exactly. The MERs could have been killed by any number of other things too. Maybe the bolts wouldn't have blown to set the rovers free of the landers. Maybe the solar panel wings wouldn't have deployed, so the rovers would have been as good as dead anyway. All kinds of things can go wrong, many of which could end the mission before it begins. You just have to hope that everything goes as planned.

QUOTE (ustrax @ Nov 23 2006, 07:25 AM) *
I'm sure that when the airbag idea appeared there were also comments regarding the lunacy of the idea... wink.gif
The time is to innovate and...roll! wheel.gif

I seem to recall something from a documentary about the MERs that was to this effect, that a lot of people thought that airbags would never stand a chance of working. So I think you're right.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Navin
post Mar 16 2007, 02:49 AM
Post #50


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 21-November 06
Member No.: 1380



QUOTE (mars_armer @ Nov 21 2006, 02:14 PM) *
A search on youtube for "JPL MSL" came up with this:
MSL EDL Animation



This MSL EDL video was played tonight on stage at this Kobie Boykins presentation. It was fantastic. The video was longer and extended beyond the YouTube version to include more surface operations. It included a nice segment where the laser ablated a rock and an instrument recorded readings from the "smoke" wafting away and the hole in the rock. Spiffy demonstration.

The longer video also depicted a core sampling drill that could be used on rocks or on the "soil". The core sample (depicted from penetrating a rock) was slipped out of the bit and placed INTO the MSL for some unspecified analysis. Very cool. I hope the whole video makes it onto the web soon.

Kobie Boykins is a MER solar panel designer. Someone in the audience remarked that the MSL video showed no solar panels. He responded (paraphrased): "No. No solar panels. I'll let you speculate on what its power source is, since I'm not allowed to publicly discuss it yet." wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Mar 16 2007, 04:24 AM
Post #51


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 6828
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Hmm...curious, but probably wise for a mass audience.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ustrax
post Mar 16 2007, 11:26 AM
Post #52


Special Cookie
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2168
Joined: 6-April 05
From: Sintra | Portugal
Member No.: 228



QUOTE (mars_armer @ Nov 21 2006, 07:14 PM) *
A search on youtube for "JPL MSL" came up with this:
MSL EDL Animation


That zooming out in the end, leaving MSL all alone, gives me a chill in the stomach... tongue.gif


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jim from NSF.com
post Mar 16 2007, 11:36 AM
Post #53


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 321
Joined: 6-April 06
From: Cape Canaveral
Member No.: 734



QUOTE (Navin @ Mar 15 2007, 10:49 PM) *
The longer video also depicted a core sampling drill that could be used on rocks or on the "soil". The core sample (depicted from penetrating a rock) was slipped out of the bit and placed INTO the MSL for some unspecified analysis. Very cool. I hope the whole video makes it onto the web soon.


I believe that the corer no longer is part of the mission
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Mar 16 2007, 11:40 AM
Post #54


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13599
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



QUOTE (ustrax @ Mar 16 2007, 11:26 AM) *
leaving MSL all alone


If you feel sorry for the 3/4 ton rover with nucelar power and a frickin laser beam on its mast....what must you feel for the MER's smile.gif

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ustrax
post Mar 16 2007, 11:49 AM
Post #55


Special Cookie
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2168
Joined: 6-April 05
From: Sintra | Portugal
Member No.: 228



Doug...
They're grown up now, our two girls have shown to know how to take care of themselves... wink.gif


--------------------
"Ride, boldly ride," The shade replied, "If you seek for Eldorado!"
Edgar Alan Poe
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mchan
post Mar 16 2007, 12:02 PM
Post #56


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 593
Joined: 26-August 05
Member No.: 476



Yes!!! More of them 3/4 ton rovers with nuclear power and frickin laser beams attached to their masts!!! Throw me a bone here, I want high definition video, too!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
As old as Voyage...
post Mar 16 2007, 12:03 PM
Post #57


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 117
Joined: 7-December 06
From: Sheffield UK
Member No.: 1462



QUOTE (Navin @ Mar 16 2007, 02:49 AM) *
This MSL EDL video was played tonight on stage at this Kobie Boykins presentation. It was fantastic. The video was longer and extended beyond the YouTube version to include more surface operations. It included a nice segment where the laser ablated a rock and an instrument recorded readings from the "smoke" wafting away and the hole in the rock. Spiffy demonstration.

The longer video also depicted a core sampling drill that could be used on rocks or on the "soil". The core sample (depicted from penetrating a rock) was slipped out of the bit and placed INTO the MSL for some unspecified analysis. Very cool. I hope the whole video makes it onto the web soon.

Kobie Boykins is a MER solar panel designer. Someone in the audience remarked that the MSL video showed no solar panels. He responded (paraphrased): "No. No solar panels. I'll let you speculate on what its power source is, since I'm not allowed to publicly discuss it yet." wink.gif


Laser sampling of a martian rock and core drilling by MSL are seen as part of the following Sky at Night extended Mars special. They may be from the same simulation as mentioned above and look pretty cool:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/spacegu.../proginfo.shtml


--------------------
It's a funny old world - A man's lucky if he gets out of it alive. - W.C. Fields.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
gpurcell
post Mar 16 2007, 03:19 PM
Post #58


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 214
Joined: 21-December 04
Member No.: 127



Sure gives a sense of just how radical the Skycrane concept is.

That's got to be the most "science-fictiony" thing I've ever seen bent into metal.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
As old as Voyage...
post Mar 17 2007, 11:51 AM
Post #59


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 117
Joined: 7-December 06
From: Sheffield UK
Member No.: 1462



Upon seeing the MSL rover in simulations I'm always struck by just how scorpion-like the thing looks. That inclined rear RTG really gives it a sting in the tail and the whole thing looks quite menacing, like it'd eat Sojourner for breakfast!


--------------------
It's a funny old world - A man's lucky if he gets out of it alive. - W.C. Fields.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stephen
post Mar 19 2007, 10:11 AM
Post #60


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 307
Joined: 16-March 05
Member No.: 198



QUOTE (mars_armer @ Nov 22 2006, 06:14 AM) *
A search on youtube for "JPL MSL" came up with this:
MSL EDL Animation

Came across this student project version of MSL's EDL sequence on Youtube (done "a few years ago"): Re: MSL EDL.

======
Stephen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

10 Pages V  « < 2 3 4 5 6 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 17th April 2014 - 06:32 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.