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MSL Video
gpurcell
post Mar 19 2007, 06:35 PM
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Oh, and I forgot to mention that I love the Firefly style camera work in the JPL animation....
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Toma B
post May 30 2007, 07:30 AM
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Just find this...
Mars Science Laboratory Mission Animation - May 25, 2007
MSL animations


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The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful.
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nprev
post May 30 2007, 10:55 AM
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Thanks, Toma! smile.gif

Man...LOTS of moving parts on this critter...


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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Toma B
post May 30 2007, 12:00 PM
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I like that Hollywood-style action camera movement in and out of rover... smile.gif


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The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful.
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My "Astrophotos" gallery on flickr...
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Stu
post May 30 2007, 01:35 PM
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Just watched the animation (a loooong download on dialup, but worth it! Thanks for the link!) and a whole range of thoughts went thru my mind...

Watching the initial descent: Wow, that's amazing!!

Watching the Skycrane part: *****!!! Are they INSANE?!?!?!?!?! They're really going to DO that?!?!?!?! Hang it beneath a rocket platform like something off Thunderbirds?!?!?! Are they NUTS?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif

Watching the surface operations: oh, can't wait for that...

Watching the rover hang its head and go to sleep at the end of a sol: awwwwwwww........

Watching the rock sample going through the works: if THAT all works it'll be a miracle...

Watching the closing sequence as the dusty rover rolls away: I want that. Now.


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RedSky
post May 30 2007, 03:20 PM
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The whole suspend and release process really scares me. I remember a probable cause for the Mars Polar Lander's failure was when the landing gear extended the "bump" that created may have been interpreted as touchdown, so the engines cut off while still at altitude. I can see a similar tug or bump possibly happening to MSL while in suspended state (from air turbulence, swinging, or reaching the bottom of the cable reel-out.)

I don't know why the "skycrane" (in basically its same configuration), couldn't just have landing leg extensions (straddling MSL) and actually land (eliminating the MSL hanging in air). Once landed, MSL could just be similarly reeled down a few inches to the surface, cut loose, and then drive away. That way, they still have their immediately rovable rover, without the dangerous in-air suspension.
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gallen_53
post May 30 2007, 04:00 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ May 30 2007, 01:35 PM) *
Watching the Skycrane part: [i]*****!!! Are they INSANE?!?!?!?!?! They're really going to DO that?!?!?!?!


You are not alone in your assessment of Skycrane. What's really nuts is the future of the Mars Program may depend upon the success of MSL.
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djellison
post May 30 2007, 04:01 PM
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QUOTE (RedSky @ May 30 2007, 04:20 PM) *
Once landed, MSL could just be similarly reeled down a few inches to the surface, cut loose, and then drive away. That way, they still have their immediately rovable rover, without the dangerous in-air suspension.


I think you would end up with a lot of rocket exhaust and high velocity dust impinging on the rover if you did that. The MPL failure was, so they think, a software fault. A line of code would have fixed it - there's little analogous to MSL with the MPL failure really.

And yes - MSL EDL looks crazy. Not as crazy as MPF and MER though.

Doug
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gallen_53
post May 30 2007, 04:13 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ May 30 2007, 04:01 PM) *
And yes - MSL EDL looks crazy. Not as crazy as MPF and MER though.


There's a fine line in spacecraft design between aggressive and crazy. MPF and MER were both very aggressive designs. In addition, I would call MER an aggressive but excellent design. Unfortunately, the less said about MSL the better....
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 30 2007, 04:31 PM
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QUOTE (gallen_53 @ May 30 2007, 06:00 AM) *
You are not alone in your assessment of Skycrane. What's really nuts is the future of the Mars Program may depend upon the success of MSL.

I could have covered up the member name of this post and still have guessed that Gary is back biggrin.gif
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gallen_53
post May 30 2007, 04:47 PM
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QUOTE (AlexBlackwell @ May 30 2007, 04:31 PM) *
I could have covered up the member name of this post and still have guessed that Gary is back


Alex, I never really left. I've been too busy working to do anything other than lurk here.

Have you been involved in the latest Mars Design Reference Mission (DRM)? They tried to suck me into it but the activity is unfunded (that says something). I'd like to be more involved with the DRM but can't justify taking time off from funded work.
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 30 2007, 05:41 PM
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QUOTE (gallen_53 @ May 30 2007, 06:47 AM) *
I'd like to be more involved with the DRM but can't justify taking time off from funded work.

I'm not sure about NASA Ames but I believe JPL has a special financial code (like 999999 or something) for recording work time on "funding: uncertain" projects, aka "The Land of No Return." biggrin.gif
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gallen_53
post May 30 2007, 06:56 PM
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QUOTE (AlexBlackwell @ May 30 2007, 05:41 PM) *
I'm not sure about NASA Ames but I believe JPL has a special financial code (like 999999 or something) for recording work time on "funding: uncertain" projects, aka "The Land of No Return."


About three years ago I was doing pre-Phase-A interplanetary work almost full time. Now, almost all of that has dried up. What little pre-Phase-A work that I'm still doing is unfunded, e.g. the occasional Venus and Saturn atmospheric probe. We were hoping that the Mars DRM would bring in more money but that was not the case. From my perspective there is nothing in the pipe line.

The last interesting pre-Phase-A work that I was involved in was the "CEMMENT" study. CEMMENT was essentially a Mars Sample Return mission based upon an Ares-V launch vehicle and aerocapture at Mars. The bottom line for CEMMENT was $10 billion dollars riding on a single launch.

I'm not optimistic about what's going to happen at JPL after MSL reaches its logical conclusion. It's like there's a curtain hanging over the end of 2008 and no one can see past it. I guess it all depends on what the next President has in mind for the Space Program and whether there is any money to achieve it.
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Juramike
post May 30 2007, 07:30 PM
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Is there any possibility of mounting instrumentation (weather instruments, seismometer, etc.) on the "platform" section of the descent stage without making things too complicated?

Seems reasonable to expect that it could make a fairly soft landing and might make a nice local cross reference to data from the MSL as it wanders around.

(Imagine the PR release as the MSL comes roving into view.)

-Mike


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Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
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Jim from NSF.com
post May 30 2007, 11:52 PM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ May 30 2007, 03:30 PM) *
Is there any possibility of mounting instrumentation (weather instruments, seismometer, etc.) on the "platform" section of the descent stage without making things too complicated?

Seems reasonable to expect that it could make a fairly soft landing and might make a nice local cross reference to data from the MSL as it wanders around.

(Imagine the PR release as the MSL comes roving into view.)

-Mike


It isn't going to make a "soft" landing. It will have no power nor telemetry or even a spacecraft computer.

Also, MSL will probably avoid the descent stage since it will be leaking hydrazine
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