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July 23 Tethys Imaging, South polar imaging
angel1801
post Jul 1 2006, 06:45 PM
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I have been using the solar system simulator alot on the July 23 Tethys encounter and from what I see, Cassini will be able to image all of the remaining bits of Tethys' south polar region that until has been poorly imaged.

Is this true?


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volcanopele
post Jul 10 2006, 07:09 PM
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yepper. There is a great Tethys opportunity on that date. Closest approach looks to be around 120,000 km. Low-phase, best imaging of Odysseus that I am aware of smile.gif Thanks for bringing this up.


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volcanopele
post Jul 10 2006, 09:07 PM
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Actually, Rev26 could be a good orbit for icy sats. Decent observations of Rhea and Dione are also planned, though not as good IMHO as the Tethys stuff. Like the Rev25 Enceladus observations where we missed the satellite, the Tethys observation is a ride-along observation. We should still hit the satellite, this time (fingers crossed)


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ugordan
post Jul 11 2006, 07:25 AM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jul 10 2006, 10:07 PM) *
Like the Rev25 Enceladus observations where we missed the satellite, the Tethys observation is a ride-along observation.

Missed it? I'm curious of the ways that can happen. Is it merely a consequence of ride-along observations where you miss a slew or just bad Inertial-Vector-Propagator-thingies?


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jul 15 2006, 02:23 AM
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Yes, a great Tethys flyby with closest approach at 120,000 km, subspacecraft lat=-39.7, subspacecraft lon=85.8, phase=37.5.

There is also 45,000 km Telesto flyby on July 24. I wonder if any imaging is planned for that flyby.
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alan
post Jul 23 2006, 06:33 PM
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One image down, nice view of the chasm
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...eiImageID=79848
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Big_Gazza
post Jul 24 2006, 10:48 AM
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QUOTE


Odd feeling of Deja Vu, check out this previous image from Feb 2005...

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...fm?imageID=1353
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angel1801
post Jul 25 2006, 08:40 AM
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The raw images are available to view now.


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alan
post Jul 25 2006, 10:03 AM
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Check out the area to left of center in this image of Tethys, it appears to have fewer craters (is younger than?) the area it the right.
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...2/N00064170.jpg
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David
post Jul 25 2006, 10:35 AM
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QUOTE (alan @ Jul 25 2006, 10:03 AM) *
Check out the area to left of center in this image of Tethys, it appears to have fewer craters (is younger than?) the area it the right.
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...2/N00064170.jpg


The boundary looks curved. Could it be a shallow impact basin that's been entirely filled in?
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Michael Capobian...
post Jul 25 2006, 03:24 PM
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QUOTE (David @ Jul 25 2006, 06:35 AM) *
The boundary looks curved. Could it be a shallow impact basin that's been entirely filled in?


It would have to be a very big one. There is a sharp border between the two terrains, coming right out of the side of Odysseus, but for most of the border there doesn't seem to be any topographic evidence of a basin rim.

It's interesting that the dark band area at the bottom right looks so similar to the adjoining, brighter terrain.

Michael
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MarcF
post Jul 25 2006, 06:36 PM
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Are you sure the big crater o the picture is Odysseus ?
It seems to be a little bit too small. I would say Melanthius or Antonous, one of the big craters localized near the south pole.
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volcanopele
post Jul 25 2006, 07:37 PM
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It's Melanthius.


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 25 2006, 08:24 PM
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There certainly do seem to be regional variations on Tethys... I don't think this boundary is a basin rim. The cratered side almost looks like a swarm of secondaries, or similar-looking craters, as if (say) a shattered co-orbital splattered across this area.

Phil


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David
post Jul 25 2006, 08:51 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jul 25 2006, 08:24 PM) *
There certainly do seem to be regional variations on Tethys... I don't think this boundary is a basin rim. The cratered side almost looks like a swarm of secondaries, or similar-looking craters, as if (say) a shattered co-orbital splattered across this area.

I'm just guessing here, but wouldn't that produce a gradient in crater size (increasing toward the site(s) of impact and decreasing farther away) rather than a sharp(ish) boundary?

If not an impact basin, could it be a surface flow of some kind, caused by localized melting (or at least enough of a temperature increase to render the icy surface more plastic)?
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