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China to the Moon - Chang'e 1 and 2, Chinese unmanned lunar orbiters
GravityWaves
post Aug 24 2006, 05:03 PM
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Lunar Programme To Be Open To World
Although China is still in the "initial stage" in tapping the moon and outer space when compared with the United States, Russia and Europe, the nation is catching up, Luan said.
http://www.spacedaily.com/dragonspace.html
The first phase of the Chang'e Project was solely accomplished by China through its own technology, products and designs, said Luan, former director of the China National Space Administration (CNSA).
However, lunar scientists from Europe, the United States and Russia have expressed their willingness to co-operate with China in its research of the moon and deep space exploration, he said.

Chinese scientists are assembling, integrating and testing to ensure that the mission of the nation's first lunar explorer, Chang'e-1, goes smoothly, a top space official said yesterday.
http://english.people.com.cn/200607/26/eng...726_286707.html
"Fundamental development has been achieved in all five related systems ranging from the satellite, the rocket, tracking and control, ground applications and the launch centre since it was approved two years ago," said Sun Laiyan, head of the China National Space Administration.
The lunar orbiter is scheduled to blast off next year from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in Southwest China's Sichuan Province, Sun said at the ongoing eighth International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) Conference in Beijing.

The spacecraft will be 2350 kilograms in weight.
According to the plan, the program will go through four phases.

1. Send a satellite to orbit the Moon
2. Conduct exploration on the surface of the moon through the soft landing of a detector.
3. Collect Moon surface samples using a robot, which will then return to the Earth.
4. Manned missions.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chang'e_program
According to the schedule, detailed program design of the first step will be completed by September 2004. Research and development of a prototype probe and relevant testing of the probe will be finished before the end of 2005. Design, manufacture, general assembly, test and ground experiments of the lunar probe satellite will be finished before December 2006. In 2007 the Chang'e 1 will blast off.
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climber
post Oct 12 2006, 09:24 PM
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Here's the link to China's lunar program : http://210.82.31.82
Home page is nice where you can see foot prints crossing the moon as well as Chang'E nice logo. I red that the Logo "CLEP" look like the pictogram "Yue" which means "Moon".
Not very informative but nice to see.
Enjoy


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Oct 13 2006, 05:29 PM
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Well the Chinese will certainly get to the Moon, as their hardware is Soyuz-based and the Russians are working to re-engineer the Soyuz vehicle to last for another century ohmy.gif ... Héh even for a lunar mission ohmy.gif
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GravityWaves
post Feb 28 2007, 08:31 PM
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'People's Daily Opinion'
http://english.people.com.cn/200702/07/eng...207_348107.html
Why does China want to probe moon?

QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Oct 13 2006, 02:29 PM) *
Well the Chinese will certainly get to the Moon, as their hardware is Soyuz-based and the Russians are working to re-engineer the Soyuz vehicle to last for another century ohmy.gif ... Héh even for a lunar mission ohmy.gif


Soyuz sized rockets can also launch small-medium sized probes like Russia's Venera or Europe's Venus-Express, the Chinese LongMarch rocket family may be used for upcoming interplanetary missions
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NMRguy
post Mar 7 2007, 08:08 AM
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6423323.stm

A short story from BBC. China looks to launch Chang'e before the end of the year.
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yaohua2000
post Mar 7 2007, 08:48 PM
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QUOTE (NMRguy @ Mar 7 2007, 04:08 PM) *
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6423323.stm

A short story from BBC. China looks to launch Chang'e before the end of the year.


In fact, the launch is only 40 days away. Chang'e 1 will be blasted off on April 18, can vary by ±1 day.
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elakdawalla
post Mar 7 2007, 08:53 PM
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That was the plan, but the latest information I've heard is that it won't be until October at least. (This is from Lou Friedman, who got it through personal communication with folks in China.)

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dvandorn
post Mar 8 2007, 01:41 AM
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You know what I find really fascinating? I'm pretty sure that, given subtle changes in how we transliterate Chinese names these days, Chang'e is named after the same character described by the Houston Capcom to the Apollo 11 crew the morning of Landing Day, July 20, 1969:

QUOTE
Houston: Among the large headlines concerning Apollo this morning, there's one asking that you watch for a lovely girl with a big rabbit. An ancient legend says a beautiful Chinese girl called Chang-o has been living there for 4000 years. It seems she was banished to the Moon because she stole the pill of immortality from her husband. You might also look for her companion, a large Chinese rabbit, who is easy to spot since he is always standing on his hind feet in the shade of a cinnamon tree. The name of the rabbit is not reported.

Collins: Okay. We'll keep a close eye out for the bunny girl.


biggrin.gif

-the other Doug


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edstrick
post Mar 8 2007, 09:20 AM
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Perhaps the most interesting data from Chang'e will be the microwave radiometry. Thermo-physical mapping of the moon has been rather neglected since the classic 1960's thermal imagery during a total lunar eclipse showed high-rock abundance areas as "anomalies" due to their higher thermal inertias. The microwave radiometry will penetrate deeper and give some idea of the diurnal temperature variations at probably a few centimeters depth, and thus the density/thermal-conductivity or some such measure of regolith.

Nobody else seems to have been or be planning long wavelength infrared or microwave radiometry and they'll get a unique dataset. (I think one of the other missions, maybe Recon Orbiter or the Japanese Selene may have infrared radiometry/spectrometry at long enough wavelengths to get the pre-dawn signal, but I think most IR work is in the short wave <mostly> reflected IR data.

Apollo 17 carried an scanning IR radiometer, but the PI basically abandoned the data without producing any science results and some attempt later in the 80's or so ran into problems getting the data or something... Somebody tried but I never heard of results.
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remcook
post Mar 8 2007, 10:00 AM
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Lunar Diviner will go up to 200 micron...

http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/database/Master...UNARRO&ex=2
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edstrick
post Mar 9 2007, 06:24 AM
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"Lunar Diviner will go up to 200 micron"

Excellent. That covers temperature ranges of cold high latitude regolith at pre-dawn temperatures.

The multispectral capabilities give them some real ability to sort out rock and "fines" populations on the basis of different temperatures, much the way Viking and follow-on Mars orbiters have done thermal inertia maps, and then "fines thermal inertia" and rock abundance maps.

You have to go to much longer wavelengths to probe below the surface "monolayer" of grains, which the chinese instrument appears to be planned. Later missions need to fly decimeter and meter wavelength sounding instrumentes (like Sharad, and Marsis), together with real ability to measure sub-surface thermal emissions, which may give the ability to observe and map regional heat flow abilities.
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Jun 12 2007, 11:13 PM
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Excerpt from the June 11, 2007, issue of Aviation Week & Space Technology:

QUOTE
World News & Analysis
China Delays Moon Mission
Aviation Week & Space Technology
06/11/2007, page 31

Craig Covault
Cape Canaveral and Houston

Chinese problems thrust Japan to forefront in Asian Moon race

Printed headline: Moon Mission Delay

China will postpone its first unmanned mission to the Moon by at least 5-6 months, a delay that under current scheduling means Japan will beat China to lunar orbit with a far more ambitious triple-spacecraft launch.
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kenny
post Oct 13 2007, 09:16 AM
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Chang'e launch appears to be imminent. The craft is at the launch site (I don' think they mean pad) and they're selling tickets to Chinese nationals to watch it for about $100.

Buy Chang'e launch tickets

and Leonard David's blog says it will launch by the end of October

Leonard David blog

Kenny
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ustrax
post Oct 13 2007, 12:57 PM
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QUOTE (kenny @ Oct 13 2007, 10:16 AM) *
Chang'e launch appears to be imminent...


One of this days they'll get us all by surprise when they announce the launch of the first human towards Mars... wink.gif


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nprev
post Oct 14 2007, 01:06 AM
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QUOTE (kenny @ Oct 13 2007, 02:16 AM) *
Chang'e launch appears to be imminent. The craft is at the launch site (I don' think they mean pad) and they're selling tickets to Chinese nationals to watch it for about $100.


Huh. Well, it seems that we should have at least a week's notice before launch, then; gotta give people time to get there, make reservations, etc.


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