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Updated Titan Map
scalbers
post Mar 3 2012, 08:42 PM
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And here's volcanopele's 2011 radar map with feature names. More of the smaller lakes are labeled:

Attached Image


Latest version with full resolution: http://laps.noaa.gov/albers/sos/features/c...zero_center.png

Steve


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 3 2012, 11:30 PM
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As for the seams... don't forget these are preliminary rather than final mission products. There's not much point putting all that effort into making a perfect map if it's going to be superceded very soon. You'll see much better stuff after Titan imaging is finished.

Phil



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tanjent
post Mar 4 2012, 06:56 AM
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I have to marvel at how much remains unknown about Titan, even after eight years of flawless performance by Cassini/Huygens.
There is certainly a huge amount left to be sorted out by an airplane or balloon mission, not to mention floating and seismic platforms.
All treats in store for future generations, it would seem.
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machi
post Mar 15 2012, 07:07 PM
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One of the Jason's map (thanks!) with labeled SAR swaths (all of them between T00A to T071 and even one from T77 flyby).
It's in PDF format, so it's easier to find location of every radar swath of Titan.

White labels - "normal" SAR swaths.
Yellow labels - Hi-SAR swaths.
Red labels - mostly Hi-SAR swaths not used in background map.




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titanicrivers
post Mar 19 2012, 12:54 AM
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Thanks Machi for that very useful update of the Titan map! VP's maps are awesome but the overall map was not labeled and (at least in this blogsphere) are now more useful due to the white labels especially.
Below is your map (at reduced size and resolution) with a coordinate grid as many referenced photos and swaths are given by such coordinates.
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JRehling
post Mar 23 2012, 05:06 PM
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Here's my take on Titan, an effort I've wanted to pursue to get a map that is relatively seamless, relatively tied to scientific reality, and relatively complete. I shared this with a few people last fall.

First, a huge component of what I have began with the maps that Fridger Schempp has posted at the following link. Everything I have produced is built on his contribution, which may well be 90% or 99% of the total work that produced my map.

http://forum.celestialmatters.org/viewtopic.php?t=305

My work is based on, in essence, a black-and-white map, which is Fridger's with a few added areas of focus, particularly the northern lakes and seas as seen by RADAR (fused in with IR imagery of southern Kraken), plus some IR coverage here:

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA14908

The most original portion of my work is in adding a color overlay. Color information for Titan comes from VIMS, and the coverage is highly variable depending upon incidence angles. This produces some ugly seams that I wanted to eliminate at the hazard of throwing out the scientific and accurate information (which is not well captured in those seams, anyway).

My approach in producing the color map was to combine two sources: First, global VIMS maps as seen here in the second map, using channels: B=1.27 μm, G=2.0 μm, R=4.8-5.2 μm.

http://europlanet.dlr.de/node/index.php?id=482

I also used VIMS details from the (very exciting) paper here:
http://barnesos.net/publications/papers/20...s.Evaporite.pdf

The second color source (and the bridge used to connect those areas where VIMS coverage is poor) was the thematic mapping of equatorial areas in the particularly inspiring in Figure 19.19 Chapter 19 of "Titan From Cassini Huygens".

My overall approach was to extend the thematic mapping (which had a VIMS-inspired palette for the bright/blue/brown regions) to the higher latitudes, without providing much detail besides the categorical existence of the lakes and seas, and the VIMS-orange areas such as Tui, Hotei, and as seen in the evaporite paper. I blended the thematic map and the VIMS products with no principle other than aesthetics, trying to keep the VIMS details whenever possible without creating ugly (and implausible) seams.

It is exciting for me to contemplate the mapping of chemical composition to color; the five basic colors of my map are:

Blue: VIMS-blue areas, like the methane-wet sands where Huygens touched down. (Dark blue except in eastern Xanadu, where the blue signal covers bright terrain.)
Dark Brown: VIMS-brown areas, the sand dunes in equatorial regions.
Orange: HC3N deposits that are evaporites, left also in cryovolcanic regions.
Dark aqua: The methane/ethane lakes and seas.
"Bright": rendered yellowish in Stephan, et al, but varying in hue in VIMS products, notably more greenish in Xanadu where the 2.0 μm signal is stronger; coincidentally, radar volume scattering is stronger there too, which made me consider greenish overlays to distinguish how volume scattering looks to me in ice. The ambiguity of the composition of this bright terrain fed a major obsession in my reading the past few months; an intriguing story that has left us so far uncertain what is covering the largest portions of Titan.

I've attached a labeled version of the map. This has been repackaged a lot of ways: Unlabeled, a petal map, and a globe. I can upload the unlabeled and petal maps later if people are interested. I also attached some pictures of the resulting globe, and a side-by-side of the Titan globe with the Europa globe I made with the USGS map.

There is some work that can be done, especially in waiting for more coverage of the northern areas, and more VIMS coverage to add resolution in the color, where I airbrushed it into a pleasing but not always accurate seamlessness. But I can say that I have a Titan globe beautifying my home.
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Floyd
post Mar 23 2012, 05:24 PM
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Fantastic, thank you!


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ngunn
post Mar 23 2012, 06:36 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Mar 23 2012, 05:06 PM) *
I can upload the unlabeled and petal maps later if people are interested.


Yes please! These are the brilliant fruits of a most worthy project. I'm sure quite a few people will relish the prospect of making their own Titan globe. smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif
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JohnVV
post Mar 27 2012, 04:21 AM
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there is the Perl script from
http://www.vendian.org/mncharity/dir3/planet_globes/
for taking a map and turning it into a globe"
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JRehling
post Mar 27 2012, 03:39 PM
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The file sizes are quite large. I saved them as low-loss jpgs, and I'll post each separately. Here is the south polar petal plot.

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JRehling
post Mar 27 2012, 03:40 PM
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And here is the north polar petal plot. I left an azimuthal orthographic map as the background for the petals, so if you want a little "tab" to extend beyond the margins, you have something that looks about right. If you cut right on the lines, this won't matter.

I applied the labels and grid after reprojecting this, so you won't get such a nice result if you reproject the cylindrical map.
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JRehling
post Mar 27 2012, 03:43 PM
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Finally, here is the cylindrical map without labels. I hope people find this useful for widespread use in Celestia, etc.


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scalbers
post Dec 9 2012, 07:17 PM
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At the AGU conference this past week I saw a Titan presentation showing a couple of de-noised radar images. For me it really makes the features stand out and saves the "on-the-fly" visual image processing needed to see the features. I wonder if anyone has considered processing most or all of the radar data with this type of algorithm, and if this can be the basis for a global map?

Here is an older example of this type of processing:

http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/space-..._aharonson.html


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machi
post Dec 9 2012, 07:58 PM
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According to his personal page, Antoine Lucas intends to post online his denoised images of Titan soon.
I'm using different kind of non-local denoise filter - PureDenoise from Florian Luisier which isn't so good for SAR images as Deledalle's algorithm, but it's best
from filters which are available.
Here is little comparison (it's crop from T44 swath):

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titanicrivers
post Apr 3 2013, 09:51 PM
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A small portion of the cool T59 SAR shows a possible rain dissected, southern, antiSaturn hemisphere plateau. A 'denoised' (thanks for the link to PureDenoise Machi http://bigwww.epfl.ch/algorithms/denoise/ )version of this topography is shown below. While an improvement on the jpeg images posted on VP's awesome site http://pirlwww.lpl.arizona.edu/~perry/RADA...T059S01_V02.jpg, there is a vertical banding artifact that I am sure someone out there knows how to eliminate. I am hopeful another SAR will image near this Titan location as an ISS dark albedo area is nearby, perhaps an old, mid latitude S hemisphere basin.
Attached Image


Edit: I am grateful to JohnVV for his destriping of this image, improving it substantially. The coordinates and scale bar are approximate.
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