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Updated Titan Map
Decepticon
post Nov 22 2006, 10:17 AM
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I hope we get some color this time! biggrin.gif


I can't wait to see a hybrid image/radar combination. blink.gif
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JRehling
post Nov 22 2006, 06:48 PM
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QUOTE (Decepticon @ Nov 22 2006, 02:17 AM) *
I hope we get some color this time! biggrin.gif
I can't wait to see a hybrid image/radar combination. blink.gif


One way to do that would be to replace ISS data with RADAR where both are available, but the two are really different, and doing that would "hide" the nonredundant ISS data.

Maybe the ideal all-Titan display would be to take the ISS as the base map, perform a primary-component analysis on the VIMS data to associate with VIMS the #1 most important dimension that is different than the ISS imagery, and then use RADAR as the third input channel. Then associate G and B to ISS and VIMS (in whichever order) and R to RADAR in an RGB map: where RADAR is not available, set red to some baseline --not zero.
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 22 2006, 09:11 PM
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Ingenious! But I think it might look like Grandma's wallpaper. I'd rather have separate maps of each dataset.

Phil


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volcanopele
post Nov 22 2006, 10:47 PM
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for those with Photoshop, a map with different layers for each data set might be possible.


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scalbers
post Nov 23 2006, 03:53 PM
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Greetings,

I think it might be interesting to try a map based on spatial filtering. In other words, larger scale details could be from ISS data and moderately finer details could be filled in with radar. VIMS could help perhaps in areas that ISS doesn't have coverage and vice versa? In any case, each dataset could fill in for those locations and spatial scales where they do best. Might be some effort, yet could provide a single more complete view.


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ngunn
post Nov 23 2006, 04:19 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Nov 22 2006, 09:11 PM) *
I'd rather have separate maps of each dataset.


I agree. Then each can do their own fancy tricks with them. I think an interesting one would be to do difference maps of infrared minus radar albedos
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antoniseb
post Dec 14 2006, 12:22 PM
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The Ciclops page pointed to earlier was last updated in Early 2005. Have the more recent flybys covered new territory? Since we seem to be focusing mostly on Titan, it might be nice to get an updated composite image like that for every flyby. We have a new pass coming on December 27th. Can we get a nice new map in honour of Kepler's 435th birthday?
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ugordan
post Dec 14 2006, 01:30 PM
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The official and updated Titan map was finished a while ago. It's obviously pending a release sometime soon (I'm really hoping by the end of the year, this hiatus has IMHO gone for long enough), maybe they're waiting for one of those significant dates to release. I'm thinking Christmas or the sorts. Probably updated maps of other icy sats as well.


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Julius
post Dec 19 2006, 08:23 PM
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Has someone got an explanation why Titans dark flat plains are along the equator??Dont think that is coincidental!
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tuvas
post Dec 19 2006, 08:26 PM
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It sounds like what you guys want is a JMARS for Titan. Jmars allows one to get all of the latest images (It doesn't do MRO, yet...), and compare between several different missions. It would work well to compare VIMS/RADAR/ISS images, there'd just be a layer for the whole planet. Of course, Titan doesn't have the large number of images that Mars does, but...
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Olvegg
post Dec 19 2006, 09:09 PM
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QUOTE (Julius @ Dec 19 2006, 11:23 PM) *
Has someone got an explanation why Titans dark flat plains are along the equator??Dont think that is coincidental!

It could be probably due to tides of Saturns that trigger plate tectonic. They are strongest in equatorial region. So dark areas may be analogue of ocean floor on Earth. And Xanadu and Adiri - Titanian analogue of continents?
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Matt
post Dec 19 2006, 10:13 PM
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There was a time in Titan's earlier history when, apparently, it was subject to the same degree of tidal squeezing that Europa experiences today at Jupiter.

And thats a lot of tidal stress.
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JRehling
post Dec 19 2006, 11:16 PM
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QUOTE (Julius @ Dec 19 2006, 12:23 PM) *
Has someone got an explanation why Titans dark flat plains are along the equator??Dont think that is coincidental!


Notice that Venus's rifts run primarily along the equator and that the Valles Marineris is roughly equatorial on Mars. With the exception of Ganymede and Callisto (which is surfacewise totally dead), all of the solid worlds in that size range have signs of equatorial tectonism.

There's a compelling overlap to be made between Venus, Mars, and Titan. Xanadu = Tharsis? Hotei = Aphrodite? The similarities are intriguing.
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dvandorn
post Dec 20 2006, 06:14 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Dec 19 2006, 06:16 PM) *
Notice that Venus's rifts run primarily along the equator and that the Valles Marineris is roughly equatorial on Mars. With the exception of Ganymede and Callisto (which is surfacewise totally dead), all of the solid worlds in that size range have signs of equatorial tectonism.

Hmmm... not *all* of the worlds in that range, since Venus and Earth are of near-identical size and mass. Earth has a lot of tectonic activity, but its shattered crust seems to exert more control over the orientation of rifts and crustal cracking than whatever it is on these other worlds that causes equatorial tectonics.

-the other Doug


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Juramike
post Dec 21 2006, 03:24 PM
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QUOTE (dvandorn @ Dec 20 2006, 01:14 AM) *
Hmmm... not *all* of the worlds in that range, since Venus and Earth are of near-identical size and mass. Earth has a lot of tectonic activity, but its shattered crust seems to exert more control over the orientation of rifts and crustal cracking than whatever it is on these other worlds that causes equatorial tectonics.



Could differences with Earth and Venus be explained away by past/current history?

Earth's moon-making impact probably caused massive new cracks as it's surface reformed, and Venus's periodic resurfacing may reset the tectonic lines with each resurfacing event.

Maybe equatorial tectonics is the norm for mid-size worlds?

-Mike


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