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CRISM Corner
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Sep 28 2006, 02:14 AM
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APL-Built Mineral-Mapping Imager Begins Mission at Mars
JHU/APL
For Immediate Release
September 27, 2006

See also A.J.S. Rayl's story at TPS.

EDIT: I changed the topic title because, as I understand it from the press release, the cover was opened, not jettisoned.

This post has been edited by AlexBlackwell: Sep 28 2006, 04:48 PM
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tglotch
post Sep 28 2006, 04:54 AM
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woohoo!

Vis/Near-IR spectra at roughly THEMIS Vis (~17 m) spatial resolution. This will be an awesome mission. I'm psyched to see the first results.
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jabe
post Sep 28 2006, 02:55 PM
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There are too many cool things with MRO smile.gif
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Sep 29 2006, 07:29 PM
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As pointed out by Rakhir in another thread:

New Spectrometer Begins Its Global Map of Mars
September 29, 2006
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Oct 5 2006, 07:21 PM
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I'm starting this thread as a respository for all things CRISM biggrin.gif I'll merge the other thread dealing with CRISM's cover succesfully opening with this one.

And as Doug first glogged yesterday, CRISM has released its "First 'Targeted' Observation of Mars."
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SteveM
post Dec 10 2006, 02:53 PM
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Given the silence of late from the CRISM folks at Johns Hopkins APL, might it be worthwhile to contact some of the staff there to see what can be done to improve their public visibility.

Hopkins is a first rate school, (it hosts the Hubble STScI on its campus) and could get some good press if the folks at APL got their act together.

Steve
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monitorlizard
post Dec 11 2006, 02:48 AM
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QUOTE (Steve @ Dec 10 2006, 08:53 AM) *
Given the silence of late from the CRISM folks at Johns Hopkins APL, might it be worthwhile to contact some of the staff there to see what can be done to improve their public visibility.

Hopkins is a first rate school, (it hosts the Hubble STScI on its campus) and could get some good press if the folks at APL got their act together.

Steve

Processing CRISM data is enormously more complicated than for HiRISE. A major task is separating the true spectra of the Martian surface from atmospheric spectral contributions. It's the kind of thing they'll probably be refining for years in mathematical theories. That said, I agree that they should be making a greater effort to share their progress with the public, even if it means releasing only intermediate-stage data. A HiBlog style blog would be most welcome.
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Dec 11 2006, 06:57 PM
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QUOTE (Steve @ Dec 10 2006, 04:53 AM) *
Given the silence of late from the CRISM folks at Johns Hopkins APL, might it be worthwhile to contact some of the staff there to see what can be done to improve their public visibility.

As monitorlizard noted, processing the CRISM spectra is vastly more different than providing web-ready HiRISE imagery. Note that TES and THEMIS IR releases lagged, too.

NASA-funded planetary science missions usually publish their initial results (traditionally in Science) 5-6 months after the data acquisition begins. I wouldn't be at all surprised if MRO follows the same path.
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tuvas
post Dec 11 2006, 07:36 PM
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QUOTE (AlexBlackwell @ Dec 11 2006, 11:57 AM) *
As monitorlizard noted, processing the CRISM spectra is vastly more different than providing web-ready HiRISE imagery. Note that TES and THEMIS IR releases lagged, too.

NASA-funded planetary science missions usually publish their initial results (traditionally in Science) 5-6 months after the data acquisition begins. I wouldn't be at all surprised if MRO follows the same path.


HiRISE is relatively easy to process compared to CRISM. HiRISE will eventually reach the point of releasing images as soon as the processing is complete, but that might still be a while. It should be among the fastest missions to release processed data in history. We just aren't quite there yet...
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monitorlizard
post Dec 12 2006, 09:36 AM
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QUOTE (AlexBlackwell @ Dec 11 2006, 12:57 PM) *
As monitorlizard noted, processing the CRISM spectra is vastly more different than providing web-ready HiRISE imagery. Note that TES and THEMIS IR releases lagged, too.

NASA-funded planetary science missions usually publish their initial results (traditionally in Science) 5-6 months after the data acquisition begins. I wouldn't be at all surprised if MRO follows the same path.

I don't have any inside knowledge, but I would bet that the first major appearance of CRISM findings will be in the 2007 Lunar & Planetary Science Conference abstacts, to be online late January or early February. Could be substantial, as abstacts can be two pages in length.
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monitorlizard
post Dec 12 2006, 09:42 AM
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Abstact should be abstract. I guess if I were a pirate I would use rrrrrrrr more often.
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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Dec 13 2006, 07:25 PM
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As noted in today's AGU-related press release in the other thread, some CRISM data were released today (here and here).
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Julius
post Dec 14 2006, 09:46 AM
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Roughly how long does it take for water interacting with basalt to produce clay?
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tty
post Dec 14 2006, 06:42 PM
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QUOTE (Julius @ Dec 14 2006, 10:46 AM) *
Roughly how long does it take for water interacting with basalt to produce clay?


It varies a lot depending on climate. In wet tropical areas volcanic rock weathers to (incidentally quite fertile) clayey soils in a few centuries while on Iceland lavas that are more than 1,000 years old are still unvegetated and almost unweathered. Even under the warmest and wettest conditions conceivable on early Mars I would guess millenia would be required to create any appreciable amounts of clay.

tty
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Julius
post Dec 14 2006, 09:17 PM
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Correct me if I'm wrong ,Nili fossae like other fracture systems,seem to be associated with tectonic areas,in this case with Syrtis Major. Would it be right to assume that water flowing along this fracture system would have been water runoff associated with volcanic eruptions from Syrtis major?Certainly that would not mean that the presence of clay formations in this area would mean that there was an ongoing hydrological cycle on Mars!Right or wrong?I am assuming that volcanic eruptions were episodic and thus water flowing within the fractures would have been episodic rather than water pooling for long periods of time!Any comments regarding this matter would be much appreciated.
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