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jamescanvin
post Jan 20 2007, 12:18 AM
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QUOTE (Tesheiner @ Jan 19 2007, 08:53 PM) *
Now I'm confused.
Wasn't the images for the long baseline those from the positions as of sols 1058 and 1060? Perhaps the confusion is because they were actually taken on sols 1060 and 1061 but *before* driving?


Ah sorry about that, it seems I was even more confused than I realized! I assumed that the images that came down were from the long baseline sequence - and they are clearly from after the drive. But those are in fact the "drive direction" images (I hope they don't!). Still, they made for a good *very* long baseline image.

James


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fredk
post Jan 20 2007, 12:37 AM
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From the latest update,
QUOTE
Opportunity was scheduled to take a picture of comet McNaught on the morning of the rover's 1,063rd sol, or Martian day, of Mars exploration (Jan. 20, 2007).

How cool can it get?!

Also two new names: Cabo Anonimo = Cape B2, and Guam = Dock of the bay.
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Stu
post Jan 20 2007, 01:08 AM
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Hmmmm... unsure.gif I doubt the comet will look very impressive from Mars, what with a) Mars being a lot farther away from it than Earth, and cool.gif the comet appearing much closer to the Sun in the sky as seen from Mars than from Earth, but hey, you never know...


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jamescanvin
post Jan 20 2007, 01:29 AM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jan 20 2007, 12:08 PM) *
I doubt the comet will look very impressive from Mars,


Maybe it won't *look* very impressive, but the *idea* of seeing a comet at all from the surface of Mars is VERY impressive (to me anyway). smile.gif pancam.gif


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jamescanvin
post Jan 20 2007, 01:39 AM
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QUOTE (Tesheiner @ Jan 19 2007, 08:53 PM) *
I won't expect another move until sunday/monday (sols 1064/1065).


1064 it is. wheel.gif


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CosmicRocker
post Jan 20 2007, 06:24 AM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jan 19 2007, 06:37 PM) *
From the latest update,
How cool can it get?!

Also two new names: Cabo Anonimo = Cape B2, and Guam = Dock of the bay.
Indeed. smile.gif I simply find it amazing that our robotic proxies on another planet, originally designed to be remotely controlled geologists have learned new skills, and are now astronomers as well. Surely it's not just not cosmetic. Having a longer baseline for astronomic observations should add to our knowledge of the orbits, or at least help to better calibrate our instruments.

As for Guam, it just doesn't have the same ring as "sitting on the dock of the bay." I think I'll always remember it with our name.


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nprev
post Jan 20 2007, 07:03 AM
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I seem to recall an old painting that showed a major comet from the surface of Mars (Bonestell, Ludek Pesek, or William Hartmann?)...selfishly hoping here that the pics of McNaught include some Martian horizon, but I have no idea what the viewing geometry will be.


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Stu
post Jan 20 2007, 08:26 AM
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QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Jan 20 2007, 01:29 AM) *
Maybe it won't *look* very impressive, but the *idea* of seeing a comet at all from the surface of Mars is VERY impressive (to me anyway). smile.gif pancam.gif


ABSOLUTELY! biggrin.gif Couldn't agree more. I was just commenting on the practicalities, that's all. I had a go simulating it on STARRY NIGHT and to Oppy the comet will be very close to the Sun in a very bright dawn sky...

Attached Image


but the comet doesn't actually "pop out" until you turn the sky colour off. I suspect it might not be visible, but with that long tail who knows... No-one would love to see an image of a comet blazing in Mars' dusk sky more than me. rolleyes.gif


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Stu
post Jan 20 2007, 08:49 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Jan 20 2007, 07:03 AM) *
I seem to recall an old painting that showed a major comet from the surface of Mars (Bonestell, Ludek Pesek, or William Hartmann?)...selfishly hoping here that the pics of McNaught include some Martian horizon, but I have no idea what the viewing geometry will be.


This one?

Comet above Mars


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Bob Shaw
post Jan 20 2007, 01:56 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jan 20 2007, 01:08 AM) *
Hmmmm... unsure.gif I doubt the comet will look very impressive from Mars, what with a) Mars being a lot farther away from it than Earth, and cool.gif the comet appearing much closer to the Sun in the sky as seen from Mars than from Earth, but hey, you never know...


Stu:

Mars is Heaven!

o No wet windy weather
o No bloody dew on your optics
o No light pollution (OK, two moons, but they're not that big)
o No midgies (a Scottish version of Black Fly, hell in the summer)
o No nosy neighbours

OK, there are some disadvantages:

o Dust Devils (whoops, er, 'cleaning events')
o No atmosphere


Bob Shaw


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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Jan 20 2007, 03:35 PM
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Guests






Images from Opportunity are down, nothing obvious in them... BUT remember the images we get are contrast stretched considerably, so it might be there in the original.

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...cam/2007-01-20/
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 20 2007, 04:51 PM
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I used those new images to look instead at the distant hills. This is a composite of all six frames, enlarged 200% and merged. The real data might show some proper detail on the hills.

Phil

Attached Image


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nprev
post Jan 20 2007, 07:10 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jan 20 2007, 12:49 AM) *


That's the one; thanks, Stu! smile.gif It's actually by Kim Poor, then.


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diane
post Jan 20 2007, 10:49 PM
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QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Jan 20 2007, 01:24 AM) *
As for Guam, it just doesn't have the same ring as "sitting on the dock of the bay." I think I'll always remember it with our name.

To be geographically, historically, and pedantically accurate, Magellan landed at Guam in Umatac Bay, his first landfall after crossing the Pacific. Fort Soledad was the Spanish fort built on the point that overlooks the bay.

I think "Umatac Bay" has a nice ring to it, but then I have my own prejudice on this.
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jvandriel
post Jan 21 2007, 02:52 PM
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Here is the L0 Navcam panoramic view from Sol 1061.

jvandriel
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