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Moon Images
tedstryk
post Feb 17 2007, 09:28 PM
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I updated my site with a page with images of the moons of Uranus and Neptune. I will develop individual pages with more imagery, including color stuff eventually.
Here is the link.

Also, here is a link to the Proteus page, the only indivudual page that is already up.


By the way, at the bottom of the index page, I have a new shot of Neptune and Triton from WFPC 1 from before the repair mission.



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antipode
post Feb 17 2007, 10:26 PM
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Beautiful!

I knew Miranda was battered and resurfaced, but I didn't realise how 'out of round' it actually was. That white crater on Umbriel has always intruiged me - I assume its excavated to fresh ice below? I wonder if we will get better images that this of the Uranian system in our lifetimes... sad.gif

P
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 10 2007, 05:53 PM
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Maybe this is an OK place to put this. I just made this for one of my students, and I might as well get more use out of it. It was hard to find in a quick google search or via Photojournal.

This is the clearest image of one of the plumes on Tritn, and I have labelled it to show the vent site, the vertical column, and the wind-transported plume.

Phil

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elakdawalla
post Apr 10 2007, 08:20 PM
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Thanks, Phil! I've tossed it into the planetary.org image database -- should come in handy someday.

--Emily


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hendric
post Apr 10 2007, 09:22 PM
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Calvin Hamilton's excellent SolarViews website has an "animation" of one of the plumes:

http://www.solarviews.com/raw/nep/geyser.mov
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/triton.htm

I don't think the plume is moving per se, but rather the angle of the photo is changing causing the plume to parallax (Is that a verb? smile.gif ) over the surface.


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Ian R
post Apr 11 2007, 05:30 AM
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Here's an interesting video on the subject of Triton's plumes:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2361275885502809184


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Rob Pinnegar
post Apr 11 2007, 02:59 PM
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Yeah, the white crater on Umbriel is neat -- note there is also another crater with a white peak. That moon's a bit of a chocolate-dip-cone, I guess.

Umbriel isn't one of my favorite moons, but I've wondered occasionally if it mightn't have some similarities with Iapetus --- sort of a "global Cassini Regio". However, since we don't see craters "punching through" Cassini Regio, the comparison's not very appropriate. It's fun speculation, though.
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tedstryk
post Apr 25 2007, 11:59 AM
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I tried to draw the best most I could out of the Voyager Umbriel set. The problem is that not only are the images distant and scarce, but because Umbriel has such a dark surface, they are either badly underexposed or smeared, for the most part.



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ngunn
post Apr 25 2007, 01:02 PM
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QUOTE (hendric @ Apr 10 2007, 10:22 PM) *
Calvin Hamilton's excellent SolarViews website has an "animation" of one of the plumes:

http://www.solarviews.com/raw/nep/geyser.mov
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/triton.htm

I don't think the plume is moving per se, but rather the angle of the photo is changing causing the plume to parallax (Is that a verb? smile.gif ) over the surface.


I've had that movie saved to show to my students for some time but never realised that it probably shows parallax changes rather than true movement. If that is so then perhaps a cross-eye stereo view is more appropriate than an animation. One of our computer boffins kindly produced this from two of the movie frames (with me nagging over his shoulder):

Triton geyser stereo.jpg (Edit: doesn't work yet - but it will!)
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karolp
post May 9 2007, 05:04 PM
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Hello everyone,

A friend of mine is also experimenting with outer moons these days :-) I thought I could share a link to his latest creation - does THIS Proteus hang out of your screen?

Proteus 3 D


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tedstryk
post May 26 2007, 08:41 PM
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I have created a montage of the images from the flybys of the six largest Uranian moons (Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon). The images are to scale (not to the size of the worlds, but to their apparent size from Voyager. The exceptions are the closest views of Ariel and Miranda, which were scaled down. I have posted a small version below, and a link to the full version.



http://www.strykfoto.org/outericymoons/urcombo.jpg


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tedstryk
post May 27 2007, 12:34 AM
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To add a bit of perspective, here are some color images with similar illumation shown to scale (in the case of Puck, since there is no Voyager color, I gave it a reddish hue to conform to groundbased data).



Also, I animated the Titania approach. I haven't corrected the set for the fact that some images are just colorized because there was only one image at that point, and the other individual images vary between OGV, GBUV, and other such combinations. Also, the first image was taken quite a while before the others.



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David
post May 27 2007, 03:39 AM
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QUOTE (tedstryk @ May 26 2007, 08:41 PM) *
I have created a montage of the images from the flybys of the six largest Uranian moons (Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon). The images are to scale (not to the size of the worlds, but to their apparent size from Voyager. The exceptions are the closest views of Ariel and Miranda, which were scaled down. I have posted a small version below, and a link to the full version.

http://www.strykfoto.org/outericymoons/urcombo.jpg


It's very pretty -- but sadly it reminds me of how little we know about even the surface appearance of Uranus' moons, and that I am likely to be a very, very old man before we find out anything more. sad.gif
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mchan
post May 27 2007, 06:19 PM
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I like the presentation. Good work!
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tedstryk
post Jun 1 2007, 04:03 AM
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I am thinking I might have arranged the Miranda images wrong. The thing spins so quickly and liked a pinwheel that it gets confusing. Phil, you might know if this is right.
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