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Rosetta Mars Flyby, Info and Links
djellison
post Feb 22 2007, 12:41 AM
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As you might all know by now - I'm heading to ESOC for the media event that ties in with the flyby and so with a lot of help from Emily and the Rosetta Science Operations Centre at ESA - I've done a flyby chart...just the imaging instruments, but it's fairly usefull. Emily's got a vertical one in the works in the same style as her excellent New Horizons timeline.

Other interesting resources...

http://www.space.irfu.se/rosetta/sci/mars/
http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EGU2007/069...88baf6c8092ff18
http://spaceurope.blogspot.com/2007/02/ros...ng-lessons.html
http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/dsp_mars.cfm?b...uttonSelL2=mars
http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/dsp_aliceMars....uttonSelL2=mars
http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/dsp_miroMars.c...uttonSelL2=mars
http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/dsp_iesMars.cf...uttonSelL2=mars

And - in CET ( one hour ahead of UT )
25 February 2007, 2 a.m. start

02:00 - Doors open & Filming opportunity in Mission Control Room
02:40 - Welcome by David Southwood, ESA Director of Science Programme
02:50 - Rosetta Mars swingby the manoeuvres and flight dynamics, Uwe Feucht, Head of Flight Dynamics Division/Team
03:00 - En route science, first images, Gerhard Schwehm, Head of Solar System Science Operations Division & Rosetta Mission Manager
03:10 - Introductory comments on approach ; Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division and Rosetta Flight Operations Director Comments on eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager Comments on closest approach/eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo & Paolo Ferri
03:15 - Closest approach to Mars, eclipse starts
03:17 - Ground stations, Manfred Lugert, Head of Ground Facilities Operations Division
03:28 - Occultation ends - signal back
03:30 - Imagery from Rosetta and Mars Express , Uwe Keller, Mas-Planck Institute
03:40 - Comments on eclipse end and telemetry acquisition, Andrea Accomazzo,
03:52 - Conclusions, Manfred Warhaut, Head of Mission Operations Department
04 :00 - End of event


I'd say I was looking forward to it....but that's somehow not quite enough.

Also attached - Anim Gif of 1 frame per hour flyby smile.gif

Doug
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elakdawalla
post Feb 22 2007, 02:59 AM
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I don't mind posting a preview of the timeline here in case anybody wants to have a look and correct my usual errors or make any suggestions. (Yes, I know it says "1997" at the top; that's how I'm hiding it from general view smile.gif)

--Emily


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Stu
post Feb 22 2007, 07:49 AM
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First of all, congratulations to Doug on his new post as UMSF Ambasador to ESA. smile.gif Seriously, just reward for all your hard work and dedication to Mars exploration in particular and space science Outreach in general. You'll do a fine job there, and I'm sure there'll be plenty of us online at the time to keep you and each other company and share the encounter.

I'm looking forward to seeing the close-ups, of course, but I can't wait to see those crescent images. For some reason, for me personally crescent planetary portraits have always been more aesthetically pleasing than full discs. Not sure why, they just are. Maybe it's because I always used to draw crescent Moons in the sky of my pictures when I was a kid (even in daytime pictures, haha, how my teachers told me off for that!!)... maybe it's because a crescent Moon looks so much prettier through my telescope... don't know... but the crescent images of Jupiter returned by recent missions, and more recently Cassini's (well, Ian's!) crescent Saturn portraits have always amazed me, so a crescent Mars - which I've simulated in Celestia etc many times - will be quickly inserted into my Outreach Powerpoint presentations.

Bring it on!! smile.gif


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djellison
post Feb 22 2007, 09:18 AM
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Well - I've not been able to find anything about Philae, the lander, during it's 3 hour phase of operating on its own....but it's cameras should, I think, provide a spectacular view of Mars - and i'm trying to make a little movie of that segment using Dave Seals frankly awesome Solar System Simulator smile.gif

I'm looking forward to it - it's going to be a flying visit and I'm not sure just how much of a 'live' blogging I will be able to do - but hopefully I provide something more than what people will get from just watching ESA TV

Doug
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ustrax
post Feb 22 2007, 09:25 AM
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Doug, I'm sure you'll do a great work... smile.gif

Here's one more important link (including a vodcast)

And Philae's fact sheet

Have a safe travel and may ESA treat you well... wink.gif

EDITED: Philae instruments to be used on the Lander: CIVA imaging system + ROMAP (the plasma instrument and Magnetometer) + the Standard Radiation Monitor.
Lander instruments can run through closest approach as the Lander has it own power system running on batteries.


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ugordan
post Feb 22 2007, 09:39 AM
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Apologies if this was already addressed somewhere, but will there be a webcast of the event? There are those of us who don't pick up ESA TV...


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djellison
post Feb 22 2007, 09:43 AM
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I would imagine there will be something here - http://television.esa.int/default.cfm

Sorting out my stuff ( laptop, mini-disc recorder for interviews and press con. etc ) and my colleague Josh had a GREAT idea...

laugh.gif

Maybe not smile.gif

Doug
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djellison
post Feb 22 2007, 11:30 AM
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And - courtesy of the brilliance that is Dave Seal's Solar System Sim ( http://space.jpl.nasa.gov )

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/doug_im...philae_mars.mov ( 3 meg )

This is the view of Mars at 1 minute per frame and played at 15 frames per second (i.e. 1hr = 4 seconds) during the three hours of Philae operations during the middle of the flyby.

Doug
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ustrax
post Feb 22 2007, 11:45 AM
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Martian...rings?! blink.gif
Rosetta is a must... smile.gif

EDITED: Doug...That's superb! biggrin.gif


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tedstryk
post Feb 22 2007, 11:54 AM
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Is there any significant difference in capability between Omega and Virtis?


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djellison
post Feb 22 2007, 12:06 PM
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Well -

Omega
Imaging capability

128 contiguous, across track fields of view, each of 1.2 mrad, corresponding to < 500 m at periapsis

Spectral capability

352 contiguous spectral channels to acquire the entire spectrum from 0.36 to 5.2 Ám for each resolved pixel

Photometric capability

SNR > 100 over the full spectral range, allowing the identification of percentage absorptions and thermal variations



VIRTIS

The imaging channel VIRTIS-M is required to provide
a minimum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 100 in both
spectral ranges, 0.25 - 1.0 mm and 1-5 mm at the
nominal sampling under the measurement baseline
conditions relative to the mapping and close
observation phase, which is considered as the design
driver for VIRTIS-M.
The high-resolution channel VIRTIS-H is required to
perform high resolution spectroscopy in the spectral
range between 2 and 5 mm. The above mentioned
scientific requirements imply for VIRTIS-H to provide
a SNR better than 100 and a minimum resolving power
of 1000 to resolve molecular bands. VIRTIS-H design
is driven by the requirements in both the mapping
phase and the coma observation phase, that lasts until
the comet is escorted to its perihelion.

(from http://servirtis.obspm.fr/virtis/virtis_exp.html )


At the sort of range that Virtis will be working (i.e. not CA) - It's going to be lower res than Omega - but higher spectral res ( 3x by my guessing )

Doug
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ustrax
post Feb 22 2007, 02:02 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 22 2007, 12:41 AM) *
03:00 - En route science, first images, Gerhard Schwehm, Head of Solar System Science Operations Division & Rosetta Mission Manager


Doug

I've just received an e-mail from Dr. Schwehm pointing out that the schedule you present (taken from here)is not updated:

"I will briefly present the overall mission objective - Uwe Keller will show
some of the first images from the approach to Mars, a panoramic view of Mars
and hopefully images of Phobos.

So we hope to get some of the results from the approach phase during the
night."

Don't miss it! wink.gif

This post has been edited.


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Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Feb 23 2007, 01:49 PM
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Guests






An update:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/SEMR7IBE8YE_0.html
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Harder
post Feb 23 2007, 08:07 PM
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Doug,
if I recall correctly one of the ESA papers on the Pioneer Anomaly stated that the Rosetta spacecraft would not be suitable for measurements which would be accurately enough to further narrow down the observed anomaly.
Is that a 100% no-no, or is there some possibility after all of ESA using this Mars swing-by for further investigations?
I'm sure the Rosetta navigational accuracy is second-to-none if ESA aims at only 250 km distance from Mars at 36000 km/hr, but that is not the only factor. The "noise" from spacecraft stabilization and very large solar panels probably drowns any potential PA effect.
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elakdawalla
post Feb 23 2007, 08:22 PM
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As far as I understand things the Pioneer Anomaly can only be studied with spin-stabilized, not three-axis-stabilized, spacecraft. Rosetta is three-axis stabilized.

--Emily


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