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Rosetta Mars Flyby, Info and Links
ustrax
post Feb 26 2007, 12:11 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Feb 26 2007, 12:08 PM) *
Jean-Pierre Bibring, one of the team...


Philae Lander co-Lead Scientist and Philae/CIVA Principal Investigator wink.gif

EDITED: Jean-Pierre Bibring at spacEurope.


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mars loon
post Feb 26 2007, 06:38 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Feb 26 2007, 12:08 PM) *
Hey, good news! When I enquired in an email about when we might expect more pictures, Jean-Pierre Bibring, one of the team responsible for That Image, very kindly wrote me back:

[i] ... we are presently processing .......... This should lead to pictures in the coming day ..

Great news Stu,

and I completely agree with your sentiments to speed the release of images ASAP and keep the momentum created by those STUNNING images going !

ken
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JRehling
post Feb 26 2007, 11:10 PM
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QUOTE (OWW @ Feb 26 2007, 02:56 AM) *
It's not that the released images are not satisfying, it's the FEAR that ESA won't release any more of those wonderful images.


My fear is that an enabling factor behind these images is that they have no [obvious] scientific news therein, so there's no motive for a PI to hold onto them. Setting us up for indefinite embargoes when the actual science mission results come in.

By analogy, imagine if Voyager had published their Earth-Moon picture immediately, but had not released their pictures from Jupiter, Saturn, et al, until many months after the encounters. That would have robbed humanity of something that, admittedly, most of humanity didn't PAY for, but that enriched the lives of countless people who saw them. It was a lot more exciting to think "Wow -- our Voyager is at Jupiter" than it would have been to think, "Here are some images Voyager took during its Jupiter flyby last year."
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JRehling
post Feb 26 2007, 11:14 PM
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QUOTE (mchan @ Feb 25 2007, 04:41 PM) *
Sure, if one were actually there with a handheld camera, use of a flash to fill in the solar array would have made for a much nicer photo. But the result as is nevertheless is still great


I thought one of the best aspects of the picture was that the dark rigging to the left shows a bit of marslight glinting off of it. A flash would obscure that.

The picture with the little man needs a word balloon saying "CRIKEY, it's cold out here!"
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Stu
post Feb 26 2007, 11:19 PM
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Just got back from work, raced to the computer and logged on looking forward to seeing more Rosetta pics...

Nothing.

Sigh.

Bit poor that, ESA. The world is watching, and seeing blank screens.

Maybe tomorrow... unsure.gif


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dvandorn
post Feb 27 2007, 01:13 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Feb 26 2007, 05:10 PM) *
My fear is that an enabling factor behind these images is that they have no [obvious] scientific news therein, so there's no motive for a PI to hold onto them. Setting us up for indefinite embargoes when the actual science mission results come in.

By analogy, imagine if Voyager had published their Earth-Moon picture immediately, but had not released their pictures from Jupiter, Saturn, et al, until many months after the encounters. That would have robbed humanity of something that, admittedly, most of humanity didn't PAY for, but that enriched the lives of countless people who saw them. It was a lot more exciting to think "Wow -- our Voyager is at Jupiter" than it would have been to think, "Here are some images Voyager took during its Jupiter flyby last year."

Had the Voyagers used the same release policy as ESA, we would have seen two or three images each of Jupiter and Saturn, maybe one each of Uranus and Neptune, and if we were really lucky one image each of each of the targeted moons. And we would have waited for from six months to three years after the images were acquired before seeing them.

After all, the general public has absolutely no need or desire or interest in seeing more than one or two images of something, right? That kind of thing is obviously only of *any* interest to the PIs, right?

mad.gif mad.gif mad.gif

-the other Doug


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dvandorn
post Feb 27 2007, 01:30 AM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Feb 26 2007, 06:08 AM) *
...This should lead to pictures in the coming day, possibly released via ESA.

Possibly? POSSIBLY???

I'll be glad to be proven wrong, but I'll frankly be surprised if we see any of these pictures.

***sigh***

-the other Doug


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DDAVIS
post Feb 27 2007, 04:22 AM
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I look forward to seeing the other Mars color images presumably made showing the planets rotation, they are good enough to make a decent texture map from.

Don
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ugordan
post Feb 27 2007, 08:20 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Feb 27 2007, 12:14 AM) *
I thought one of the best aspects of the picture was that the dark rigging to the left shows a bit of marslight glinting off of it.

I think that's actually horizontally scattered light from the overexposed Mars disc to the right, not "mars-shine". It matches with the vertical extent of Mars' disc very well and does not illuminate the whole rigging at the left. The charge bleeding is also in the horizontal direction and this faint glow to the left might actually be readout smear. I doubt CIVA has anything as complex as a physical shutter to eliminate this so it's left with the same behavior as NH LORRI camera.


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Stu
post Feb 27 2007, 08:56 AM
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I emailed Dr. Gerhard H. Schwehm, Head of ESA's Solar System Science Operations Division, congratulating him on the success of the fly-by and asking when we might see some more images, and he very kindly wrote back...

"We should have more images soon - after the teams have recovered from Sunday.
I believe in the next couple of days you will find more on the ESA Web.
Though from the Lander Camera there isn't so much more to come as they only
took a couple of shots. But from OSIRIS we are looking for more."


So, we'll look forward to those! smile.gif


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Tesheiner
post Feb 27 2007, 01:04 PM
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Slightly OT...
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 25 2007, 04:50 PM) *

I was shown the door into the main control room itself and the atmosphere was extraordinary.


Well, this point recovered me some old (and funny) memories. biggrin.gif

I was a few times at ESOC on 1990/1991 when our company was working on an ESA project. The first time I was there they gave me a tour around some of the facilities, and shown me a control room (for the Meteosat IIRC). I had never seen an spacecraft control room and was expecting to see a Shuttle-like LCC (Launch Control Center) with consoles, a lot of people, and some big screens showing a world map and the spacecraft orbits. They opened the door and I had a glimpse inside the room. The consoles were there, two or three guys too, and the big screens.

But instead of the expected world map with the spacecraft orbits, one of those screens was showing, well, an American wrestling match!!! blink.gif laugh.gif
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Stu
post Feb 27 2007, 01:16 PM
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QUOTE (Tesheiner @ Feb 27 2007, 01:04 PM) *
But instead of the expected world map with the spacecraft orbits, one of those screens was showing, well, an American wrestling match!!! blink.gif laugh.gif


Are you sure it wasn't an ESA official and a spaceflight enthusiast fighting over a new pic?

"Give me that! I want to see it!"

"No! It's ours!!"

laugh.gif


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djellison
post Feb 27 2007, 01:51 PM
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To be fair - they were watching TV in the XMM-Newton / Integral control room smile.gif

Doug
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ugordan
post Feb 27 2007, 02:22 PM
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Rosetta delivers Phobos transit animation and 'sees' Mars in stereo

LOL at the DivX logo...


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SigurRosFan
post Feb 27 2007, 03:16 PM
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Is it the shadow or Phobos itself?

"... show the shadow of Phobos transiting Mars' disk ..." vs. "Phobos appears dark because it reflects less sunlight than Mars."


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