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Whole Earth images, Does any satellite provide regularly updated ones?
elakdawalla
post Mar 8 2007, 04:17 PM
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There are tons of Earth observing satellites producing gorgeous detailed images, but I'm trying to figure out if any of them is capable of producing full-globe images of Earth on some regularly updated basis. Does anyone here know of such a beast? Are there weather monitoring satellites that do this?

--Emily


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djellison
post Mar 8 2007, 04:32 PM
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Well - there's Meteosat, the European geostationary effort - but that's just one side of said globe. The latest version of Meteosat is the second generation vehicle ( MSG ) which is producing good imagery at high res, every 6 hours. Of course that means basically one full colour image over 0 degrees per day ( the 0600 and 1800 images are, of course, half dark )

Proper website is www.eumetsat.de ( might have seen signposts for Eumetsat on the way into Darmstadt on the Bus - just opposite ESOC )

I'd recommend here - http://www.sat.dundee.ac.uk - (free reg required for good stuff) for regular full res MSG imagery as well as from other, not quite so high-res or full colour etc sats. (i.e. GOESE, GOESW, IODC, MTSAT). TECHNICALLY...one could take these multiple geostationary views, and fudge some sort of global view from them.

Also - Aqua and Terra each with my favorite polar orbiting instrument MODIS, do technically cover the entire glove at about 500m/pixel, in colour, at about 1200 and 1400 LOCAL time every day - but I don't believe they produce a daily global product, just the swathes in near real time and a lot of near realtime subset that are reprojected - http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/

I guess it depends on what you mean by global.

Doug
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Juramike
post Mar 8 2007, 04:39 PM
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This will get you the "other" side of the globe. (click on the type of view and you'll get the full disk)
http://www.goes.noaa.gov/goesfull.html


And this will get you a full globe snapshot. (The rotating globe movie is waaaaaay cool-o!)
http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/composites.html

-Mike


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stevesliva
post Mar 8 2007, 04:40 PM
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You'd have to be pretty far out there to fit the whole globe in one frame, no?

The NOAA whole-earth water vapor movies are fantastic... neat eddies.
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Tom Womack
post Mar 8 2007, 04:44 PM
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I think you could get full-globe images by combining pictures from multiple weather satellites, but obviously you get no more than a hemisphere from anything in GEO. Earth is (if I've done my sums right) 20 degrees across from GEO, so you need some sort of scanning platform to take your detector across Earth.

Ah, this is already done: http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/GOES/globalwv.html has global images composed from GOES-EAST (over Peru), GOES-WEST (over the Pacific), and the two Meteosats over the Bight of Benin and Sri Lanka. I suspect there's a Japanese satellite filling the gap east of India.

These don't show the poles very well for geometric reasons, and are monochrome (OK, they're trichrome, but those are 10.8u infra-red, 2u infra-red and visible).

The polar Earth-observing satellites (say http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/) get any point on Earth every few days, but clouds move fast enough that the pictures will look pretty ugly and not line up.
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tedstryk
post Mar 8 2007, 04:46 PM
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Modis covers the entire earth every one to two days, depending on how the Aqua and Terra ground tracks fall. This page has some good stuff http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=2429

Seawifs also gets nearly full coverage on a daily basis.


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djellison
post Mar 8 2007, 04:47 PM
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Thought I would see just how hard it is to merge all the GEO MET IR imagery into one strip.....and the answer...with photoshop..is 'suprisingly hard'
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tedstryk
post Mar 8 2007, 04:47 PM
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On second thought, Emily, you are breaking the law which states that the only global image of the earth is this one:



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elakdawalla
post Mar 8 2007, 04:49 PM
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smile.gif

I'm asking this question on behalf of Lou, and I think what he really means by "global" is "looks like a globe" -- but then he probably wants to see the whole planet too. I'll have to find out what he really wants.

--Emily


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djellison
post Mar 8 2007, 04:53 PM
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Again...TEEEeeechnnically - one could take one of those global composites, reproject it as a texture in realtime and render out a globe-like sphere. But that's way beyond my talents (one offs, yeah, automated every few hours...pah)

Alternatively, who's got a few hundred million to launch Triana?

Doug
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tedstryk
post Mar 8 2007, 05:16 PM
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I want to make a comment here, but I can't without being political, so I won't. But the link I gave in the post before my last one definitely has globe-like images.


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helvick
post Mar 8 2007, 05:18 PM
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QUOTE
... the only global image of the earth is this one:

Hey - I can see my old house in that. smile.gif
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ngunn
post Mar 8 2007, 10:25 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Mar 8 2007, 04:47 PM) *
Thought I would see just how hard it is to merge all the GEO MET IR imagery into one strip


That is just amazing, Doug. What a thing to think of doing!
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Pando
post Mar 9 2007, 01:53 AM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Mar 8 2007, 08:40 AM) *
You'd have to be pretty far out there to fit the whole globe in one frame, no?


That reminds me, here's another one... tongue.gif

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climber
post Mar 9 2007, 09:39 AM
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This is one of the more inspiring Earth image to me.
You can see city's lights on the dark side while others are still seeing the sun :

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