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Whole Earth images, Does any satellite provide regularly updated ones?
remcook
post Mar 9 2007, 10:22 AM
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a shame it's not a real image. Would be nice to see the bottom of the oceans and no clouds at all in the entire world!
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Juramike
post Mar 9 2007, 04:25 PM
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I wonder if one could see the shadow resulting from the March 19th eclipse in the visible image on the Meteosat or GOES web pages?

Pity they aren't "live" webcams!


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remcook
post Mar 9 2007, 04:35 PM
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ISS sure had a good look: e.g.
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/solars...rthday2006.html

edit - I'm sure I've seen an animation of the moon's shadow moving across the earth, but can't find it right now.

pretty:
http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2006/multimedia/gal_011.php
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Juramike
post Mar 9 2007, 06:51 PM
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Very cool! I hadn't seen that before. Thanks, remcook!

-Mike


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Hari
post Mar 13 2007, 02:56 PM
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I create global cloud mosaics for the xplanet project from satellite imagery downloaded from the University of Dundee. They are updated every three hours.

See here for details.
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neave
post Mar 13 2007, 03:08 PM
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EUMESAT is a geo-stationary satellite with full disc imagery in lots of spectra: http://www.eumetsat.int/Home/Main/Image_Ga...mages/index.htm

but can also be found via the link djellison mentioned I think.

There are plenty of full disc images in the Apollo Archive http://www.apolloarchive.com/apollo_gallery.html but they're not exactly modern biggrin.gif
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scalbers
post Apr 21 2007, 11:40 PM
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For clouds this is one of the things I'm working on at NOAA in connection with the Science On a Sphere project. We do have a 30-min global IR animation (interpolated to 15-min) in real-time using a mosaic from the Aviation Weather Center that I am augmenting with Japan's MTSAT data. The actual time resolution does vary over the globe depending on which satellite(s) are covering the area.

My current goal within this effort is to produce an upgraded 15-min global animation by more directly using the various geosynchronous (and polar orbiting) satellites. This will work best with the Meteosat Second Generation data that I believe would have two satellites with the full 15-min resolution over their respective areas of coverage. Other satellites would be used with appropriate temporal interpolation.

The IR mosaics exist in up to 2048x4096 resolution, though for display we sometimes reduce this by half when we wrap the animation around the sphere.


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edstrick
post Apr 22 2007, 07:52 AM
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The fundamental problem is that there are no spacecraft that can usefully image the "whole" earth beyond geostationary orbit. From 22 thousand miles out, they see to a horizon of something like 82 north and south (and the same east and west of the subspacecraft point) It's easy to imagine the view as a hemisphere, but a matched view to something from at or beyond the moon would show the difference.

Somebody should be able to match up geostationary global data to Messenger or the failed Japanese Mars orbiter or some such mission to get a quasi simultaneous match and maybe fake it using global mosaic data to show the geostationary view you'd have directly below the deep space mission.
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DDAVIS
post Apr 22 2007, 09:12 AM
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I used to make Earth textures from weather sats using images gathered during equinoxes when the lighting would cover the most of the planet. The availability of the high res European and Asian satellite coverage dried up on the GOES page I used to frequent and I gave up. I did manage to make one nice instantaneous Earth image which I colorised (with night lights added), and a days noon lighting global composite. A good 4K texture was just possible from these sources. Below can be seen a sample rendering from this work. I used 'Morph', a nice Mac package from years ago, to warp the images to fit a simple cylindrical projection, adding the poles from other sources.
I later did the same thing to MGS global swaths to make my own Mars albedo maps.

Don
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scalbers
post Apr 22 2007, 02:15 PM
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Greetings,

I can show a somewhat dated example of the animation I'm working on at this URL. The current animation has an improved blending and colorizing scheme.

http://sos.noaa.gov/datasets/Atmosphere/grayscaleIR.html

Edstrick - I think the geostationary satellites see up to about 72 degrees latitude. There are an increasing number of polar orbiting satellites that would image the poles with a reasonable frequency if you take them all together.


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helvick
post Apr 22 2007, 02:24 PM
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Steve that is stunning.

Will the newer version be made public?
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DDAVIS
post Apr 22 2007, 03:03 PM
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In a recent update to my Earth texture I added gas flares to the night lights, but data on where the flaring takes place seems elusive. National Geographic had some flare locations shown in their recent world map so I used a lot of those, and whatever Middle East, Nigeria, and Canada flare images I could find. Does anyone know of a world map showing current gas flaring?

Don
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scalbers
post Apr 22 2007, 03:23 PM
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Helvick - glad the animation played OK for you. It is a good question about whether this can be made public. You can see it at the dozen or so museums and such that have the SOS exhibit installed. In terms of having it online in real-time this is a bit different category compared with the single frame planetary maps I work on. There are various proprietary, bandwidth, or simply inertia and political issues that might stand in the way here unfortunately. One example is that EUMETSAT charges a significant amount for their high-resolution data. You're welcome to contact the "powers that be" to add your voice to this question. I suppose that the 5MB compressed animation that is on the SOS website could technically be updated in real-time.

By the way, the upper animation on the page looks to be the current colorization I'm using and the lower one is the older one we're phasing out. Although this is a little frustrating I am hoping to share with everyone what could be possible.


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edstrick
post Apr 24 2007, 09:21 AM
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"...I think the geostationary satellites see up to about 72 degrees latitude...." Yes, that sounds right.

My favorite full-disc (or nearly) images of Earth are from Apollo 4, where an automated film camera filled a film magazine with images looking out a window at a fattish crescent Earth. Some are partially cut off by camera field of view or the window-frame. It should be quite possible to work those up into a pretty spectacular high-resolution (scanned film) movie like sequence showing a little Earth rotation/spacecraft-motion/illumination shift during the sequence. I have no idea long the sequence took but I'm sure (I'm sure I hope...) the data is online.

My other fav sequence is 2 image sequences from Surveyor 7 on the rim of Tycho. The Earth was low enough in the sky to be visible in the narrow angle camera view. They took 1 image sequence per day, probably through all polarizing filter positions (no color filters on the later Surveyors) showing Earth over a range of phase angles around 180 deg phase (1 day skipped?)

They also took a series of images every ?hour? on one day near the end of the mission showing a decent Earth rotation sequence of a gibbous Earth. A bit of image mapping onto a sphere to make a global map and remapping to the spacecraft view of the Earth could make a decent movie.
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ElGrifon
post Apr 27 2007, 12:46 AM
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WOW those are just incredable images of the Earth, expecially the first one from djellison. Keep uo the great work. This is a great forum.


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