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Whole Earth images, Does any satellite provide regularly updated ones?
djellison
post Apr 27 2007, 07:31 AM
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Just to fill up this thread appropriately - from the newly released Hayabusa data smile.gif
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belleraphon1
post May 2 2007, 12:00 PM
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WOW..

These whole Earth images from departing and returning space craft are particulary evocative to me. I remember Apollo 8 transmissions in 1968. Could actually see the Earth receding.

Hayabusa has had quite a journey and I hope there will be a return image.

Craig
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elakdawalla
post May 2 2007, 04:10 PM
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I totally forgot to return to this thread after creating some pages on the topic. Thanks, everybody, for your suggestions. Here's the two pages I've put together so far:

Images of Earth from Geostationary Satellites
Images of Earth from Planetary Spacecraft

I still need to add the Hayabusa images, and I know Doug's got a few more pieces of eye candy in production... smile.gif

--Emily


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lyford
post May 2 2007, 06:10 PM
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Nice collection, Emily.

I keep forgetting there's a whole sidebar on the left of the Planetary Society Website to explore.... though I can't even keep up with your blog updates! smile.gif


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scalbers
post May 5 2007, 02:51 PM
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Yes - excellent website Emily. Nice summary of the various geostationary satellites - helps me keep track of them as I contemplate further work on high frequency global animations.

I also like the images with the Earth and moon in the same frame, we live on such a colorful and vibrant planet.


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djellison
post May 9 2007, 07:21 AM
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The page has been updated with my Galileo efforts smile.gif

That Earth 1 flyby I've only ever seen as a tiny .mov or .mpg - so I had a hack at it - every 4th(ish) frame - at full res. Quite pleased with the results.

While doing that, I also found an Earth-Moon conjunction observation from the Earth 2 flyby that is very Cassini-esque smile.gif

The Earth 2 flyby data is, on the whole, ruined by dropouts for some reason - truely tragic as it would have been spectacular !!
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Phil Stooke
post May 9 2007, 12:43 PM
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Don't forget Lunar Orbiter, Surveyor and the Zonds. There are several Earth images to be found among those datasets.

Phil


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ljk4-1
post May 9 2007, 01:10 PM
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The Japanese Mars probe Nozomi also took images of Earth and Luna,
which you can see here:

http://www.stp.isas.jaxa.jp/nozomi/MIC/MIC_e.html


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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 9 2007, 09:52 PM
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NEAR Shoemaker during the 1998 Earth swingby
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djellison
post May 10 2007, 01:36 PM
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I plan to do to NEAR what I've done to the Galileo E1 flyby - but I think there might be something a bit broken with NEAR MSI FITS and img2png - and I'm not even going to attempt it if I have to load each frame individually smile.gif

As with the Galileo flybys, I've only really seen them put together as a movie at low res. The reason I did the Galileo one was to see it at the full res - and I think the effort was worth it.

Doug
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tedstryk
post May 11 2007, 01:40 PM
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Great Galileo work, Doug.

By the way, there are several Zond images. The USGS site has quite a few from Zond-8. Zond 7 took a color earthrise sequence. Quite a few of the frames are in my collection and all over the internet, but the color quality is poor (presumably due to poor copying, based on small samples of better copies I have seen. Here is a sequence, showing what I have been able to cobble together from multiple frames, croping out areas I couldn't generate for all images. Click on this link for a larger version.




http://www.strykfoto.org/zondrise.jpg


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ugordan
post May 11 2007, 01:54 PM
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Wow, awesome, Ted!


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ugordan
post May 14 2007, 11:54 AM
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I see Doug's Galileo Earth rotation made APOD today, congrats! biggrin.gif

I was browsing through the rotation sequence raws myself and something struck me as interesting. There's a few frames that exhibit a bright glint-like speck somewhere above Argentina. It's visible in several different filter frames and it's not camera-related as it's fixed to Earth in subsequent frames though the glint appears to move slightly along the groundtrack. It's much brighter than the rest of the cloud structure visible so I was wondering if anyone has any theories?

It can be seen as a green-red charge bleed in this composite:

The brightness difference between the speck and the rest of the clouds is much lower here due to the processing than it is in the original frames.


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djellison
post May 14 2007, 01:31 PM
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It's a specular reflection off a lake in Uraguay or Argentina I think - if you run through all the images you can see it very very clearly.(when I say all, I mean every image, i.e. r, ir, g, ir, v..etc etc)

Just guessing - but my initial thoughts were that rough oceans with large amplitude waves dont produce a pin sharp specular reflection from the sun. A small lake - which could be almost totally flat - would produce a sharp specular highlight.

APOD - Sweet - I had no idea ohmy.gif

Doug
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ugordan
post May 14 2007, 01:39 PM
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I thought about a lake specular, the specular point is in about the right location, but the area seemed to be clouded over to actually see a lake. If it's actually a lake, it's great to see how much brighter speculars on a flat surface are than oceanic specular "point". As the specular point is tighter when the surface is less rough it goes to show what a cool coincidence this turned out to be.

Imagine seeing something of the sort on Titan...


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