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Targets for LRO
dvandorn
post Jul 16 2009, 04:48 AM
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Also, isn't it true that there is still a fair degree of controversy over the "discovery" of water ice at the Mercurian poles by Arecibo radar mapping?

I'm tempted to say that all we *really* know is that Mercury's poles show something different than the Moon's poles to Arecibo's radar mapping program. I don't think we can say with any degree of certainty what compositional and environmental differences are causing it.

-the other Doug


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jmknapp
post Jul 16 2009, 12:04 PM
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QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Jul 13 2009, 09:55 AM) *
Good! You answered me what I was searching about the Moon phase when Apollo 11 landed on Moon.
I knew that the Moon was either as waxing crescent or waning crescent.


Here's about what it looked like at the moment of landing, 20JUL1969 20:17:40 UT (blue dot at the A11 landing site):



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Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Jul 16 2009, 06:35 PM
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Btw happy anniversary, today restored video footage from Apollo 11 was released. I do wonder if we will see any LRO pictures of the landing sites in the near hours/days.
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ugordan
post Jul 16 2009, 06:43 PM
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QUOTE (Zvezdichko @ Jul 16 2009, 08:35 PM) *
I do wonder if we will see any LRO pictures of the landing sites in the near hours/days.

Via NSF.com:

MEDIA ADVISORY: M09-133

NASA BRIEFS MEDIA ON NEW IMAGES OF APOLLO LUNAR LANDING SITES

GREENBELT, Md. -- NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has
sent back its first images of Apollo lunar landing sites. The agency
will release the images Friday, July 17, at noon and hold a
teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT to discuss the photos and future plans
for the LRO mission.

Participating in the teleconference are:

Michael Wargo, chief lunar scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington
Richard Vondrak, project scientist, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter,
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Mark Robinson, principal investigator, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Camera, Arizona State University

To participate in the teleconference, reporters should contact Grey
Hautaluoma at 202-358-0668 or Andy Freeberg at 301-286-0746, by noon
Friday.

To listen to the event online, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio


For more information about LRO, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/lro


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 16 2009, 07:06 PM
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Yummy!

Phil


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Paul Fjeld
post Jul 16 2009, 08:06 PM
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I think they could have bagged every single landing site with that great low, western sun angle this past week. Plus who knows what else (LM, SIVB craters).
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jmknapp
post Jul 16 2009, 08:21 PM
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QUOTE (Paul Fjeld @ Jul 16 2009, 04:06 PM) *
I think they could have bagged every single landing site with that great low, western sun angle this past week. Plus who knows what else (LM, SIVB craters).


In the July 15th space.com article referenced upthread, I guess they were sandbagging a little as the photos must already have been taken several days before. Anyway, that article says:

QUOTE
For the Apollo 11 site, "you will definitely see this square thing sitting on surface," said LROC's Principal Investigator, Mark Robinson of Arizona State University in Tempe. At low sun it's likely that the lander legs will cast shadows. "It will be unambiguous that the descent stage is sitting there," Robinson said.

The descent stages of other Apollo missions should be visible, too. And the orbiter will look for Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Packages (ALSEP) – an array of scientific devices deployed on the lunar surface by Apollo moonwalkers.

"I know we'll see the descent stages...and I know we'll be able to find the ALSEPs," Robinson told SPACE.com. "You'll see things sitting on surface." Churned-up lunar regolith, the tracks of the three lunar rovers used during the Apollo program, should also be visible.


http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/09071...nding-site.html


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John Moore
post Jul 16 2009, 08:53 PM
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QUOTE (glennwsmith @ Jul 16 2009, 05:12 AM) *
Speaking of radar...how the Arecibo observatory has been able to map the poles of both the Moon and Mercury


Good description here by Campbell who was involved with those radar moon images.

John
MoonSite
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Stu
post Jul 16 2009, 09:23 PM
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This map might be helpful tomorrow, after the landing site images are released and we're all trying to identify features / tracks at Tranquility Base :-)

http://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11traverse.gif


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 16 2009, 09:46 PM
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This one might be useful too...

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/mapcatal...ST/ap_11_12_14/

Phil


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ilbasso
post Jul 16 2009, 10:29 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Jul 16 2009, 01:43 PM) *
Via NSF.com:

MEDIA ADVISORY: M09-133

NASA BRIEFS MEDIA ON NEW IMAGES OF APOLLO LUNAR LANDING SITES
...


First of all, maybe this was supposed to be nsf.gov, not .com.

There's nothing on that website or the LROC website about this that I could find. Maybe it was pulled?


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 16 2009, 10:44 PM
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Presumably NASA Space Flight, not National Science Foundation!- though I don't see the announcement on that site.

But see it here:

http://www.nasa.gov/news/media/newsaudio/index.html

Phil


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mcaplinger
post Jul 17 2009, 02:05 AM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Jul 16 2009, 12:21 PM) *
In the July 15th space.com article referenced upthread, I guess they were sandbagging a little as the photos must already have been taken several days before.

Though the article doesn't say, I'm fairly sure that interview occurred before the images were taken, if not before the launch of LRO, and probably refers to expected image quality from 50 km. From a higher altitude the resolution will obviously suffer.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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Paul Fjeld
post Jul 17 2009, 02:25 AM
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I agree. Robinson was talking before they got anything - no sandbagging. But assuming 1.2 meter/pixel at the 120km altitude, the LM Descent Stage and its shadow should be defined by no less than 70 pixels. It should be REALLY obvious and I bet you'll make out the other little bits. I'm hoping they'll say "here is the '11 site... oh yah, and here are the rest!"
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jmknapp
post Jul 17 2009, 09:43 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jul 16 2009, 10:05 PM) *
Though the article doesn't say, I'm fairly sure that interview occurred before the images were taken, if not before the launch of LRO, and probably refers to expected image quality from 50 km. From a higher altitude the resolution will obviously suffer.


Ah, that makes sense as the current altitude crossing the equator (per Paul F.) is about 120 km.


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