IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Odyssey mission status
OWW
post Apr 8 2007, 11:27 AM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 691
Joined: 28-September 04
Member No.: 99



http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/newsroom/.../20070327a.html

Engineers for NASA's Mars Odyssey mission are examining data from the orbiter to determine whether onboard backup systems never used by the 6-year-old spacecraft could still be available if needed.

Odyssey reported last week that a power processing component of the backup, or "B-side," systems had stopped working. The component, the high-efficiency power supply, has a twin that is continuing to serve the "A-side" hardware, which is operating normally. Odyssey has stayed on its A-side systems, including the A-side flight computer, since launch on April 7, 2001. However, the A-side power supply cannot serve most systems on the B-side, including the backup B-side computer. If engineers do not determine a way to restore the B-side power supply, most of the backup hardware would not be available, if it were ever needed.

Odyssey is in its second extended mission. The orbiter is conducting scientific observations and also serving as the primary communications relay for NASA's Mars rovers. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Odyssey Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft.


I hope Odyssey is not one failure away from another MGS-type loss because of this.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Apr 8 2007, 02:43 PM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7005
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Sounds kind of ominous, all right. Surprised that such a critical component apparently doesn't have a fail-safe operational mode, or a separate backup unit; not enough internal redundancy? Come to that, why weren't the two power systems designed to allow crossfeeding?

I'm sure there are good answers to these questions just as sure as I am that I don't know anything about Odyssey's design.. smile.gif ..and "Monday-morning quarterbacking" isn't the intent here. Very interested in the design attributes employed for fail-operational situations on spacecraft, though.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jeff7
post Apr 8 2007, 04:08 PM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 477
Joined: 2-March 05
Member No.: 180



So this sounds like kind of good bad news - bad news that's not really too awfully bad. As I understand it, the primary systems are still just peachy, but the backups are getting flaky.
Hopefully they do figure this out though. Those folks at NASA and JPL seem to work remote miracles on their hardware. It's a testament of good engineering when a malfunctioning robot is still capable of not only keeping itself going (generally), but also transmitting diagnostics information back home. True they can't account for everything, otherwise MGS might still be going, but they can apparently deal with quite a bit. Spirit pulled through a pretty nasty problem early on. And heck, now Spirit's pulling a nasty problem along with for a ride - its right front wheel. laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PDP8E
post Sep 18 2007, 02:06 PM
Post #4


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 522
Joined: 10-October 06
From: Maynard Mass USA
Member No.: 1241



Odyssey Off-line Due to Glitch

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070918/ap_on_sc/mars_probes


--------------------
CLA CLL
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rakhir
post Sep 18 2007, 08:04 PM
Post #5


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 346
Joined: 12-September 05
From: France
Member No.: 495



Odyssey Returning to Service After Taking Precaution
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/features.cfm?feature=1473

The spacecraft is expected to point its instruments and UHF relay antenna toward Mars today (Tuesday), to resume relaying communications from the Mars rovers on Wednesday.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tesheiner
post Sep 19 2007, 10:06 AM
Post #6


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4275
Joined: 19-April 05
From: .br at .es
Member No.: 253



> ... to resume relaying communications from the Mars rovers on Wednesday.

Today is Wednesday. The next UHF relay session is with Spirit at 12:06 UTC and the data should be downlinked at 15:55 UTC hitting the exploratorium web at 16:35.

Cross your fingers.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Astro0
post Mar 11 2009, 10:08 AM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 2813
Joined: 21-December 05
From: Canberra, Australia
Member No.: 615



We just take Odyssey for granted.But it has issues at the moment.

Unexpected temperature rise in the star camera has delayed a system reboot.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/odyssey/...y-20090310.html

Related story on the reason for the reboot.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/odyssey/...y-20090304.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Del Palmer
post Mar 12 2009, 12:58 AM
Post #8


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 213
Joined: 21-January 07
From: Wigan, England
Member No.: 1638



Looks like the procedure went well and redundancy has been restored:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2009-046
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Nomadd22
post Apr 7 2009, 10:23 PM
Post #9


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 13
Joined: 6-April 09
Member No.: 4720



Kinda funny that after two years of worrying about the bad power supply the solution was to turn it off and back on again.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Apr 10 2009, 04:51 AM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7005
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



It's the "back on again" part that's worth two years of study before turning off something that's a couple of hundred million kms away, though. Well done, Odyssey team! smile.gif


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Jan 13 2010, 09:42 PM
Post #11


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



I am trying to locate the exact date in late 2003 when Odyssey's orbit was frozen to 5 PM equator crossing. Can anybody help?


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Jan 15 2010, 05:50 PM
Post #12


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4215
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



I don't think that is correct. I believe it was February 19, 2002.

QUOTE
The Mapping Phase began once the 400 km science orbit with
approximately 5 PM equator crossing was achieved, at
19-Feb-2002 17:14:32 UTC. This time marked the beginning
of orbit number 816. The intensive science portion lasted
917 days, with at least one of the three science instruments
operating at all times throughout that period.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Jan 15 2010, 06:24 PM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



From Saunders, "2001 Mars Odyssey Mission Summary" (Space Science Reviews, 110, 2004, 1-36;
QUOTE
During the first 670 days of the mapping phase, the LMST drifts at a constant rate from its initial value of 3:54 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. At that time a maneuver using 8 m/s of delta-V will lock LMST to 5 p.m.


see also this image from the same paper:

Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monty python
post Jul 22 2010, 05:50 AM
Post #14


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 116
Joined: 2-March 06
Member No.: 692



According to marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov, Odyssey went into safe mode on july 14. The reason - an encoder controlling a gimbal that moves the solar array didn't perform correctly. A redundant encoder was switched in and the gimbal itself performed well. Full opps should resume this week. YAAAY!!

Brian
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Marz
post Jun 22 2012, 04:07 PM
Post #15


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 280
Joined: 31-August 05
From: Florida & Texas, USA
Member No.: 482




Odyssey is back online after switching to a spare reaction wheel. Hang in there!

http://news.yahoo.com/mars-odyssey-spacecr...-155336794.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 3rd September 2014 - 04:48 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.