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May 23, 2007, HiRISE release
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 23 2007, 04:01 PM
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May 23, 2007, HiRISE release
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djellison
post May 23 2007, 04:10 PM
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Ustrax - finally - you have what you asked for

http://hiroc.lpl.arizona.edu/images/PSP/di...PSP_003647_1745

http://hiroc.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2007/d..._1745_cut_b.jpg

THAT...is an abyss.

Doug
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ngunn
post May 23 2007, 04:12 PM
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Well, just look at that great big hole in the ground !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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ustrax
post May 23 2007, 04:20 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ May 23 2007, 05:10 PM) *
Ustrax - finally - you have what you asked for
THAT...is an abyss.


blink.gif biggrin.gif blink.gif
If I knew the service was so fast I could have ordered one earlier... smile.gif

EDITED: A view:
Attached Image


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lyford
post May 23 2007, 04:59 PM
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It's obvious that's an Acme Portable Hole that Wile E. Coyote left behind.... biggrin.gif

Beep Prepared 1961


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Juramike
post May 23 2007, 05:12 PM
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Wow!!!

Is that the entrance or exit? wink.gif


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nprev
post May 23 2007, 06:12 PM
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ohmy.gif ..okay, THIS made my jaw drop! Why so circular? Almost looks like a meteor punched right through a thin surface crust & into a deep dark chamber (undoubtedly making the patented Wile E. Coyote as he goes off a cliff "bomb dropping" whistle all the way down in the thin Martian air...)

Either that, or we finally found the ejection end of the linear accelerator that launched H.G. Wells' invading cylinders... tongue.gif

The imagination runs wild. If these things are really deep, you could have some interestingly high atmospheric pressure down there...


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djellison
post May 23 2007, 06:16 PM
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Well - unless its many many km's - then there are other places which will have higher atmos.press at 'ground' level. But it's still a very very exciting and interesting feature smile.gif

Doug
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stevo
post May 23 2007, 06:21 PM
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Looks to me like one of Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars moholes.

Alternatively, we could extrapolate wildly from Titan and assume that anything that dark and featureless has to be liquidish, sort-of. Or not.


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hendric
post May 23 2007, 06:39 PM
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I wonder what IR will show us, especially at night. I don't think we'll be able to look down the hole directly, unless MRO's orbit is modified, right? Maybe we need to wait for a nice, strong dust storm to kick up the tau, so that more light is sent down the hole from all around. Pretty amazing that it is pitch black!

I'm sure it's possible with to make an estimate of the minimum size and depth of the cavern based on that. Maybe we'll get lucky and something interesting will show up on IR, like the extent of the roof over the cavern. Do either of the radars on Mars have the resolution to check this out?

I don't quite understand why the incidence angle != angle of the sun above the horizon; only thing I can think of is that we're looking at a slope.

Anyone locate a wider context shot of that location? I couldn't see any lava-tube features, but the whole image might be one.

EDIT: Looks like this is Jeanne:

http://themis-data.asu.edu/img/browse/V183...&stretch=S2

Took me a bit to convince myself it's the same location.


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ElkGroveDan
post May 23 2007, 07:20 PM
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Can someone less lazy than I do the calculations on this? If we know the angle of the sun and the angle of this photo it should be easy to calculate a minimum depth for this chasm if we assume that sunlight illuminating the bottom of this hole would be visible in the image. Since nothing is visible, the depth must exceed that minimum.


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elakdawalla
post May 23 2007, 07:20 PM
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See this topic for more information and links to context images from Odyssey:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=4036

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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post May 23 2007, 07:24 PM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ May 23 2007, 07:12 AM) *
Is that the entrance or exit? wink.gif

The excitement in this thread is one thing. Just wait till the kooks get wind of this image.
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volcanopele
post May 23 2007, 07:32 PM
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Given this image's location on Mars, I would presume this is a skylight of an old lava tube. Very interesting though.


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tty
post May 23 2007, 07:43 PM
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Yes, but it must be a very large tube since the hole is more than 100 meters across. I can't remember ever seeing a window into a lava tube that big on Earth. I wonder if lava tubes scale with gravity somehow.
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