IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

33 Pages V  « < 4 5 6 7 8 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
KAGUYA lunar explorer (aka SELENE)
punkboi
post Oct 4 2007, 05:34 AM
Post #76


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 520
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



QUOTE (Norm Hartnett @ Oct 3 2007, 07:51 PM) *
Typical western nonsense! As can clearly be seen in these JAXA photos the Earth has a disk shaped body and the pristine waterfalls are falling away from the spacecraft and not visible since the craft is going to the moon. biggrin.gif


How could I have been so blind???

So we won't know how the LOI went till 9:00 AM, JST on October 5...which would be 5:00 PM, PDT tomorrow.

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/10/20071004_kaguya_e.html


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Oct 4 2007, 01:07 PM
Post #77


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5313
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



"At 5:55 a.m. on Thursday, a small engine was fired to change the probe's direction and speed and send it into an elliptical orbit around the moon's north and south poles. JAXA officials said the firing of the engine went well."

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/national/news/20071...0na036000c.html

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SpaceListener
post Oct 4 2007, 01:17 PM
Post #78


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 242
Joined: 19-August 07
Member No.: 3299



At the beginning, JAXA says that Kaguya is mainly as an experimental spacecraft to prove new technologies.. Thus, I presume that this is one of the low-profile public relations' reasons since this kind of mission has high risk of success. Hope, that all new technologies would run fine after many past setback lessons. wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jabe
post Oct 4 2007, 06:36 PM
Post #79


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 163
Joined: 16-March 05
From: Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Member No.: 201



looks like they were successful..see spaceflightnow.com article

edit:lets hope jaxa has an official update soon!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Norm Hartnett
post Oct 4 2007, 08:40 PM
Post #80


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 53
Joined: 12-November 06
Member No.: 1354



QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Oct 4 2007, 06:17 AM) *
At the beginning, JAXA says that Kaguya is mainly as an experimental spacecraft to prove new technologies.. Thus, I presume that this is one of the low-profile public relations' reasons since this kind of mission has high risk of success. Hope, that all new technologies would run fine after many past setback lessons. wink.gif


I am not sure that Kaguya can be characterized as an "experimental spacecraft to prove new technologies", except as all spacecraft are experimental. At 2 tons and half a billion dollars, carrying 15 cutting edge planetary exploration instruments, this craft is the equal of any flown to any planet. JAXA has stated that it is "the most sophisticated lunar exploration mission in the post-Apollo Era." and "the largest lunar mission since the Apollo program". This mission could be the crown jewel of Japan's planetary exploration efforts for some time to come.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SpaceListener
post Oct 5 2007, 01:42 AM
Post #81


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 242
Joined: 19-August 07
Member No.: 3299



QUOTE (Norm Hartnett @ Oct 4 2007, 03:40 PM) *
I am not sure that Kaguya can be characterized as an "experimental spacecraft to prove new technologies", except as all spacecraft are experimental.


What I was saying comes from the extract: Kaguya's mission profile
QUOTE
The key technologies, such as the lunar orbit insertion and attitude / orbit control of the Orbiter are verified for future lunar exploration.

More details about Kaguya:
Kaguya (Selene) Home Web
Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Kaguya)

I agree that the Kaguya is an impressive 3 ton spacecraft along with 15 scientific instruments.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jabe
post Oct 5 2007, 11:19 AM
Post #82


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 163
Joined: 16-March 05
From: Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Member No.: 201



press release is up.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nop
post Oct 5 2007, 05:46 PM
Post #83


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 52
Joined: 24-November 05
From: Tokyo
Member No.: 571



I am pleased to share the success of LOI with you all smile.gif

QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Oct 4 2007, 10:17 PM) *
At the beginning, JAXA says that Kaguya is mainly as an experimental spacecraft to prove new technologies..


Kaguya is a scientific mission rather than technological one, but of course it includes lots of experimental elements for new technologies.

FYI, Japan once had an experimental lunar probe, Hiten (MUSES-A), launched in 1990 to prove new technologies. The mission included LOI, successive swing-by navigation, aero-breaking by earth atmosphere, daughter satellite deployment, orbit determination using optical navigation, observation of space dusts around Lagrange points, and so on. I think Kaguya's LOI was supported by techniques acquired in Hiten mission.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiten
http://www.isas.ac.jp/j/isasnews/backnumbe...ISASnews154.pdf (mainly in Japanese, but including English articles and many figures)

We've had two unfortunate experiences in deploying of daughter satellites, Hagoromo from Hiten and MINERVA from Hayabusa sad.gif But I hope we'll get "the third time lucky" in upcoming deployment of VRAD and relay satellites smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Norm Hartnett
post Oct 5 2007, 07:22 PM
Post #84


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 53
Joined: 12-November 06
Member No.: 1354



QUOTE (nop @ Oct 5 2007, 10:46 AM) *
I am pleased to share the success of LOI with you all smile.gif


Hoorah! biggrin.gif

Now you're rolling! wheel.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Oct 6 2007, 03:58 PM
Post #85





Guests






I wonder when the first images will be published smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SpaceListener
post Oct 7 2007, 01:32 AM
Post #86


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 242
Joined: 19-August 07
Member No.: 3299



A new update from Kaguya. It has already performed the 3rd LOI.
The First LOI:
Injected orbit
Apogee altitude 11,741 km
Perigee altitude 101 km
Period 16 hours 42 minutes

The second LOI:
Apogee altitude 5,694 km
Perigee altitude 108 km
Period 7 hours 53 minutes

The third LOI: has already conducted. There are still three more.

More details KAGUYA (SELENE) Lunar Orbit Adjustment Maneuver (LOIx)

Just a curiosity, how does the spacecraft able to lower the Apogee?
Trying to understand it, it is done by firing the rocket when the spacecraft is reaching the apogee so that the next loop will go slower and thus reducing its next apogee altitude and continues until reaching the desired altitude?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jabe
post Oct 7 2007, 02:10 AM
Post #87


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 163
Joined: 16-March 05
From: Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Member No.: 201



QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Oct 7 2007, 01:32 AM) *
Just a curiosity, how does the spacecraft able to lower the Apogee?
Trying to understand it, it is done by firing the rocket when the spacecraft is reaching the apogee so that the next loop will go slower and thus reducing its next apogee altitude and continues until reaching the desired altitude?

Simple Really,
The simplest way to raise or lower the perigee or apogee is to do a rocket firing at opposite position you want to change.
ie. to lower apogee you decrease speed at perigee. or to raise apogee you increase speed when at perigee. etc...
so the burn doesn't change the current position..it affects the opposite side of the orbit.
Efficiency issues using fuel resources sometimes has multiple perigee burns to increase the apogee to the required size..which is why I believe the probe did several orbits around the Earth. (I may be wrongabout why multiple burns though wink.gif )
cheers
jb
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Oct 9 2007, 02:07 AM
Post #88


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5313
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



The Relay satellite "Rstar" will be released tomorrow.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nop
post Oct 9 2007, 08:34 AM
Post #89


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 52
Joined: 24-November 05
From: Tokyo
Member No.: 571



Rstar was successfully separated.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/10/20071009_kaguya_e.html

QUOTE (Zvezdichko @ Oct 7 2007, 12:58 AM) *
I wonder when the first images will be published smile.gif


I think data will be released after checkout of equipment. See translation of the press conference in LOI.
http://jspace.misshie.jp/index.php?LbyD%2F20071005
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SkyeLab
post Oct 9 2007, 09:04 AM
Post #90


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 99
Joined: 11-October 04
From: Oxford, UK (Glasgow by birth)
Member No.: 101



Nice update and a couple of spacecraft moonshots:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/10/20071009_kaguya_e.html#at01

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/10/img/20071009_kaguya_05l.jpg

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/10/img/20071009_kaguya_07l.jpg


Enjoy........

Brian


--------------------
"There are 10 types of people in the world - those who understand binary code, and those who don't."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

33 Pages V  « < 4 5 6 7 8 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 17th April 2014 - 06:53 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.