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Dawn Cruise
nprev
post Jun 30 2008, 11:11 AM
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laugh.gif ...Dr. Rayman is a hoot! He sure can write an entertaining update.


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ilbasso
post Jun 30 2008, 12:10 PM
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He is indeed quite an entertaining writer.

Maybe during the relatively quiet years of the cruise phase, ESA could contract out to him to write mission updates of the probes they purportedly have deployed around the solar system.


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Greg Hullender
post Jun 30 2008, 12:41 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Jun 30 2008, 04:11 AM) *
laugh.gif ...Dr. Rayman is a hoot! He sure can write an entertaining update.


A joke or two can be funny, but not one or two in every paragraph. It's hard to tell sometimes what's serious and what's not. Also, for my tastes, very little of his humor is actually funny.

--Greg
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ugordan
post Jun 30 2008, 12:48 PM
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QUOTE (Greg Hullender @ Jun 30 2008, 02:41 PM) *
Also, for my tastes, very little of his humor is actually funny.

Sadly, this is often the case for me as well which is a shame because it distracts from otherwise detailed status reports he makes.


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MahFL
post Jun 30 2008, 01:01 PM
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He sounds like a typical slightly nutty scientist type.........
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djellison
post Jun 30 2008, 01:11 PM
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See this...

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That's a line being drawn under the debate regarding Marc's writing. Some like it. Some don't. End of debate.
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jasedm
post Jul 1 2008, 10:30 AM
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I'm just pleased that we get regular updates on the mission.
The possible post-main mission rendezvous with Pallas hasn't been mentioned for a while, but IIRC the mechanics of setting it up are difficult due to Pallas' orbit being appreciably out of ecliptic.
Maybe the mission planners are going to present the relevant trajectories as a fait accompli when they're lobbying for that mission extension... wink.gif
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3488
post Jul 1 2008, 03:42 PM
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QUOTE (jasedm @ Jul 1 2008, 11:30 AM) *
I'm just pleased that we get regular updates on the mission.
The possible post-main mission rendezvous with Pallas hasn't been mentioned for a while, but IIRC the mechanics of setting it up are difficult due to Pallas' orbit being appreciably out of ecliptic.
Maybe the mission planners are going to present the relevant trajectories as a fait accompli when they're lobbying for that mission extension... wink.gif


I hope so. In December 2018, 2 Palles is on the descending node. In fact DAWN would not even have to leave the plane of 1 Cere's orbit to do this, as 2 Pallas will intersect that plane. The biggest issues will be the supply of Xenon, & the state of the solar arrays, will they still be producing enough power?

I really, really hope that the 2 Pallas option stays open. To bag all three of the Asteroid Belt's largest members would be a real accomplishment. However 2 Pallas would not be orbited, but could be a slow encounter, enabling much of the giant asteroid to be seen at a fairly high resolution.

Whilst 4 Vesta & 1 Ceres are primary mission aims, I think to not lose sight of 2 Pallas as an encore right at the very end, would be worthwhile.

No decent Hubble Space Telescope images exist of 2 Pallas do they, or have I not been able to find them?

Andrew Brown.


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ElkGroveDan
post Jul 1 2008, 04:55 PM
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QUOTE (3488 @ Jul 1 2008, 07:42 AM) *
No decent Hubble Space Telescope images exist of 2 Pallas do they, or have I not been able to find them?


from http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2008/pdf/2502.pdf

"Figure 1: Pallas imaged by HST in 336nm UV filter."
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


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Del Palmer
post Jul 1 2008, 04:56 PM
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QUOTE (3488 @ Jul 1 2008, 04:42 PM) *
No decent Hubble Space Telescope images exist of 2 Pallas do they, or have I not been able to find them?


Depends what you mean by "decent." wink.gif I don't recall seeing any press release images of Pallas from STScI, but there is a set of WFPC2 images in the MAST archive. Looks like they were taken using gyro-guiding, and so the targeting was a little off...



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Del Palmer
post Jul 1 2008, 05:01 PM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Jul 1 2008, 05:55 PM) *
"Figure 1: Pallas imaged by HST in 336nm UV filter."


Dan, great find! smile.gif Have not seen that in the raw data archives...

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3488
post Jul 1 2008, 06:47 PM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Jul 1 2008, 05:55 PM) *
from http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2008/pdf/2502.pdf

"Figure 1: Pallas imaged by HST in 336nm UV filter."


Thank you very much Dan,

I tried, high & low to find HST imagery of 2 Pallas. I had heard before that the triaxial shape had been determined from rotational light curves. That is a very good image & quite clearly shows a rounded triangular profile, the best I've ever seen of this gigantic asteroid.

I've downloaded the image.

QUOTE (Del Palmer @ Jul 1 2008, 05:56 PM) *
Depends what you mean by "decent." wink.gif I don't recall seeing any press release images of Pallas from STScI, but there is a set of WFPC2 images in the MAST archive. Looks like they were taken using gyro-guiding, and so the targeting was a little off...


Thank you very much Del also for your help.

The scientific case for DAWN to go onto 2 Pallas after the end of the primary mission is compelling.

It's great to be back here, hopefully I can contribute something of interest at some point.

Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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tedstryk
post Jul 3 2008, 06:21 PM
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This is another Hubble view. During the 2001 observations, the Hubble missed Pallas with its Planetary Camera chip, getting the image with its lower-resolution wide field portion of WFPC2.

Attached Image


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Del Palmer
post Aug 27 2008, 02:00 PM
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Latest Dawn update:

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/journal_8_24_08.asp


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Greg Hullender
post Aug 27 2008, 03:35 PM
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Hmmm. He raises the point that Dawn will cross Mars' orbit before the gravitational assist but doesn't seem to explain why. Obviously this happens with Venus gravitational assists, but that's unavoidable. I'm trying to think why it would be better to do the assist from the far side of Mars, but I can't think of any -- other than the question-begging one of "it wouldn't work the other way".

Does anyone know?

--Greg
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