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coming soon..., books to be published soon
aconnell
post Jul 2 2012, 06:28 PM
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Hi all. Does anyone know when the English edition of 'Lune' by Olivier De Goursac is to be published? Amazon UK had a release date of June 30 2012, but that came and went and now they say they don't know when it will become available. sad.gif
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monitorlizard
post Aug 8 2012, 03:48 AM
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UPDATE: Amazon.com now lists Phil Stooke's "International Atlas of Mars Exploration" book as having a release date of September 30, 2012. That seems fairly realistic in light of information we've seen previously in this thread, so it might hold.
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 8 2012, 11:07 PM
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I don't have any more specific information... I'll just wait for the royalties to start pouring in.

Phil


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Paolo
post Aug 28 2012, 12:17 PM
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Robotic Exploration of the Solar System Part 3 (Covering Cassini to the MERs) is now available on Amazon (and for download on the Springer site)


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gwiz
post Sep 2 2012, 09:32 AM
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Amazon delivered my copy yesterday, many thanks for yet another comprehensive episode of the story.
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Paolo
post Sep 2 2012, 09:59 AM
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QUOTE (gwiz @ Sep 2 2012, 11:32 AM) *
many thanks for yet another comprehensive episode of the story.


thanks, that's very kind of you. BTW, my author's copies have not yet landed in my "boite lettres"


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Explorer1
post Sep 5 2012, 07:00 AM
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I think I found a (minor) error in Part 1: near the start (on page xxvii), it is written that Mercury's mass was determined by how it gravitational affects Eros, but that can't be right since Eros is a Mars-crossing asteroid, so its orbit definitely does not take it close to Mercury...
Was it some other body?
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Paolo
post Sep 5 2012, 05:03 PM
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well spotted. I checked my references and it should have been Icarus


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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monitorlizard
post Sep 29 2012, 01:38 PM
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Just received Phil Stooke's "International Atlas of Mars Exploration" book from Amazon.com (USA). It was actually released September 24. This is an incredible reference work. I've been collecting Mars exploration publications for decades and I was amazed at how much this book contains that I had never seen before. No doubt many images/figures were the result of Phil's own work (and a lot of it). There's minimal information on Mars spacecraft (there are lots of other books for that), just endless images of Mars itself and proposed landing sites, instrument coverage plots, annotated photos from landers, etc. I was a bit disappointed that there were no color figures, but that's probably because I grew up in the psychedelic sixties. A very minor disappointment at any rate.

Congratulations on a job very well done, Phil. I recommend every Mars enthusiast buy this book so he will be encouraged to complete Volume 2! I can't say enough about how great this is (and I'm not even related to Phil).
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elakdawalla
post Oct 2 2012, 09:44 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Nov 2 2011, 01:14 PM) *
I'm very pleased to be able to say that my Mars book, The International Atlas of Mars Exploration (subtitle: The First Five Decades: 1953 to 2003) is now complete and ready to ship to the publisher.

I just got a press release about it from your University, and fired an email off to CUP -- they are shipping me a review copy smile.gif


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My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 2 2012, 10:19 PM
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... and I got my copies today as well. Right now I am following Opportunity as it leaves Victoria and heads out into the wilderness. I'll post a few Opportunity goodies when I get a chance. Every stop has to be checked for location with one of my circular pans. Every stop!

Thanks for the kind words, monitorlizard.

Phil



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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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Stu
post Dec 17 2012, 10:40 AM
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My new book - "Comets, Asteroids and Meteors", part of the 'Astronaut Travel Guide' series published by Raintree, which emily recently reviewed on her blog in her annual round-up of kids astronomy books - is finally out. The cat is very impressed by my latest publication, as you can see...

Attached Image


Still, as they say on the ads, it's the "purrfect gift for Christmas"... laugh.gif


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NGC3314
post Jan 13 2013, 12:40 AM
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Either coming soon or now available - I saw a complete copy of the series at the Long Beach AAS meeting. Springer is publishing a 6-volume series, Planets, Stars and Stellar Systems, which was conceived as more or less a combination of the coverage of the University of Chicago series on Stars and Stellar Systems and the Solar System from the 1960s and 1970s, for the new century. They seem to have finally broken down and offered to sell them individually, although at $500 a volume most access will naturally be via academic libraries or other institutions with online access bundles. (The staff must have gotten tired of my grousing, but short of firing me and finding a new editor they sort of had to put up with it). Most people here will not be so much interested in the volume I edited (shameless plug: Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology), but in Vol. 3 on Solar and Stellar Planetary Systems, edited by Linda French and Paul Kalas. There are substantial review chapters by Nadine Barlow, David Stevenson, Nancy Chanover, Fran Bagenal, Matt Tiscareno, Andrew Rivkin, Scott Gaudi, Jason Wright, Andrew Youdin, Scott Kenyon, Amaya Moro-Martin, and Alessandro Moridelli.

Versions of some of these are on arxiv, linked to authors above.
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Explorer1
post Jul 7 2013, 04:46 PM
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Not a book, but new trailer for Stephen van Vuuren's movie. He had some help from folks here, and it shows!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNce_8WHTGc
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Paolo
post Jul 6 2014, 06:56 PM
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I'm happy to report that my latest book "Robotic Exploration of the Solar System - part 4" covering all missions from 2004 to 2013 is finally off to the printer!


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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