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coming soon..., books to be published soon
monitorlizard
post Oct 10 2007, 10:43 AM
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I thought there might be some merit in UMSF members alerting each other to forthcoming books that seem especially interesting. This book complements Phil Stooke's new book quite well, and looks like a lot of fun:

Robert Godwin -- The Lunar Exploration Scrapbook (Apogee Books) coming Dec. 1, 2007 (224 pages) $18.48 at Amazon.com (US site)

Description: From single-seat landers to rocket backpacks and lunar bulldozers, this study takes readers into the imagination of the world's top aerospace engineers by presenting NASA's lunar spacecraft research. A unique blend of history and imagination, this resource covers not only the actual exploration of the moon conducted during the Apollo program of the 1960s and 1970s, but also includes a presentation of dozens of spacecraft that were never built. Vivid, colorful renderings of the conceptual crafts--many of which are not available anywhere else--are also included, providing a visual progression of NASA's technological advancements.

(At least I hope this isn't redundant of Phil Stooke's forthcoming reference standard.)
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 10 2007, 10:46 AM
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Aaargh! That's it, I'm withdrawing mine and turning to writing cookbooks!

Phil


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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tedstryk
post Oct 10 2007, 10:57 AM
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QUOTE (monitorlizard @ Oct 10 2007, 10:43 AM) *
I thought there might be some merit in UMSF members alerting each other to forthcoming books that seem especially interesting. This book complements Phil Stooke's new book quite well, and looks like a lot of fun:

Robert Godwin -- The Lunar Exploration Scrapbook (Apogee Books) coming Dec. 1, 2007 (224 pages) $18.48 at Amazon.com (US site)

Description: From single-seat landers to rocket backpacks and lunar bulldozers, this study takes readers into the imagination of the world's top aerospace engineers by presenting NASA's lunar spacecraft research. A unique blend of history and imagination, this resource covers not only the actual exploration of the moon conducted during the Apollo program of the 1960s and 1970s, but also includes a presentation of dozens of spacecraft that were never built. Vivid, colorful renderings of the conceptual crafts--many of which are not available anywhere else--are also included, providing a visual progression of NASA's technological advancements.

(At least I hope this isn't redundant of Phil Stooke's forthcoming reference standard.)


This book sounds interesting, but it looks limited to American spacecraft, and seems to be more about the actual spacecraft than the moon itself. Very interesting (and will probably reside on my shelf soon), but very different.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 29 2007, 06:59 PM
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Professor Colin Pillinger compiled an unusual spaceflight/astronomy book entitled:
"Space is a Funny Place - The funnier side of Space seen through the eyes of cartoonists"

The book has photos of spacecraft and is basically a collection of space-related cartoons into a coherent order.
It's worth noting that Colin Pillinger has not left cartoons on his ill-fated "Beagle 2" out of the book.
This is a 2000 copies limited edition Hardcover book for British 17.50, available via The Open University
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hendric
post Nov 30 2007, 07:09 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Oct 10 2007, 04:46 AM) *
Aaargh! That's it, I'm withdrawing mine and turning to writing cookbooks!

Phil


"The Lunar Cookbook: How to go from regolith to ravioli in 180 days! Includes new Solar Flare Surprise - good for eating and as a radiation shingle!"

(Imagine cover picture of a Lunar astronaut with a frying pan in one hand and a rock in the other.)


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"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
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nprev
post Dec 1 2007, 07:24 AM
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This is disturbing...now I'm hungry... blink.gif


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 6 2008, 05:07 PM
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Not a book, but the upcoming monthly issue of Spaceflight magazine for the month of March 2008, will have an article by 2 UMSF.com forum-members (Ken Kremer on DAWN & Philip Corneille on COROT). Keep an eye on: http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...id/1649/l/nl-be
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 15 2008, 12:44 PM
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Robots in Space: Technology, Evolution and Interplanetary Travel
http://www.press.jhu.edu/books/title_pages/9417.html
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peter59
post Jan 15 2008, 05:21 PM
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April 10, 2008
Titan Unveiled: Saturn's Mysterious Moon Explored
by Ralph Lorenz, Jacqueline Mitton
Publisher: Princeton University Press


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Free software for planetary science (including Cassini Image Viewer).
http://members.tripod.com/petermasek/marinerall.html
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 28 2008, 08:02 AM
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Just received an 'Internet Rumour' : Robotic Exploration of the Solar System- Part 2 could be released earlier than planned, probably July 2008, with volume 3 already planned for next year.
cool.gif
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LivingNDixie
post Jan 30 2008, 04:55 PM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Jan 28 2008, 02:02 AM) *
Just received an 'Internet Rumour' : Robotic Exploration of the Solar System- Part 2 could be released earlier than planned, probably July 2008, with volume 3 already planned for next year.
cool.gif



Have you read part one, I have seen it on Amazon a few times, thought about getting it...
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 16 2008, 07:38 PM
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A book I would like to see "coming soon..." would be an updated " The Planetary Scientist's Companion " by Katharina Lodders and Bruce Fegley. The most recent copie I could find dates from 1998, so the 13-pages Asteroids listing table is incomplete...
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 22 2008, 06:03 PM
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Well Paolo, what about a preview on "" Robotic Exploration of the Solar System - part 2 "":
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/dave.harland/...ooks/index.html
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Paolo
post Feb 23 2008, 08:57 AM
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Phil,
you asked it. Part 2 will have three chapters, and this is more or less the TOC. all titles are to be confirmed

Chapter 4 (the chapter numbers are carried over from Part 1) "The decade of Halley"
- The Crisis: about the planetary exploration crisis in the US in the 80s
- The Face of Venus: about VOIR and Venera 15 and 16
- The Mission of a Lifetime: Halley mission planning and description of Giotto, Suisei, Vega etc.
- To Venus for the Last Time: Vega at Venus
- Two Lives, one Spacecraft: ISEE 3/ICE
- "But Now Giotto has the Shout": Halley exploration
- Extrended Missions: the successive missions of Suisei, Sagigake and Giotto to G-S
- Low Cost Missions: Take One: Planetary Observer and Mariner Mk II
- Comet Frenzy: Comet exploration projects: CAESAR, SOCCER, CRAF, the Rosetta sample return etc.
- The Rise of Vermin: Asteroid exploration projects: Vesta, Piazzi, AGORA, Asterex, NEAR etc.
- An Arrow to the Sun: Solar probes
- Into the Infinite: Interstellar probe precursor studies
- Europe tries harder: Kepler, Mercury orbiters etc.
Chapter 4 is complete and we are correcting it

Chapter 5 "The Era of Flagships"
- The Final Soviet Debacle: Fobos
- Mapping Hell: Magellan
- The Reluctant Flagship: Galileo
- Asteroids into Minor Planets: Galileo to Venus, Gaspra, Ida etc.
- A New Galilean Satellite: Galileo primary mission
- Return to Europa and Io: Galileo Europa and millennium missions, end of mission
- Beyond the Pillars of Hercules: Ulysses
- The Darkest Hour: Mars Observer
- Overdue and Overexpensive: the Mars Rover and Sample Return mission of the 80s
Chapter 5 is almost complete and I am making the first correction pass

Chapter 6 "Faster, Cheaper, Better"
- Sails Return: the Martian solar sail regatta etc.
- A New Hope: the Discovery program, Clementine 1 and 2
- In Love with Eros: NEAR
- Completing the Census: Pluto Fast Flyby, Pluto Kuiper Express etc
- NASA Licks its Wounds...: Mars Global Surveyor
- Sinking the Heritage: Mars 96 and Russian projects
- Wheels on Mars: Mars Pathfinder
Chapter 6 is 70 per cent complete as of today


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James Van Allen
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remcook
post Feb 23 2008, 02:00 PM
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Besides Ralph's book, there will also be:

http://titanaftercassini.com/index.asp

and an update of: http://www.worldscibooks.com/physics/4142.html

There's quite a bit of choice!

There's also going to be a Saturn book (I'm sure that's not the only one either!):
http://www.saturnaftercassini.org/

A shame these conferences are so horrendously expensive...
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