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coming soon..., books to be published soon
Stu
post Oct 17 2008, 11:35 AM
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Not so much "Coming soon" as "probably in your local bookstore now and screaming out from the shelf to be bought..." laugh.gif

I bought Andrew Chaikin's new book "A PASSION FOR MARS" and I'm afraid to say that I'm seriously considering hitting him with a lawsuit for compensation, specifically for loss of earnings. I have things to do. I have Outreach talks to plan, school talks to organise, writing and editing deadlines of my own, oh, and a full time job to go to too, but I can't get ANYTHING done because Andy's book is so good. If you've read "A MAN ON THE MOON" you'll be familiar with his writing style and passion for the subject; well, this book - as its name suggests - has passion in bucketfuls. It's just a wonderful read, lots of "Wow, I never knew that!" insight into what goes on behind the scenes of the Mars exploration community.

There are also some fantastic pictures, many I've never seen before, including some remarkable Mariner photos that look incredibly crisp and detailed, much better than any I've seen elsewhere.

I could say more, but no point really. If you have an interest in Mars this book is a must-buy! But if you really don't like lyrical waxings then it might not move you as much as it did me, 'cos Andy is definitely as deeply in love with Mars, and the beauty of space exploration, as many of us here are, and he wears his heart on his sleeve when it comes to how he feels about this stuff.


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djellison
post Oct 17 2008, 12:10 PM
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I was fortunate enough to read a preview copy. It's bloody amazing. And for those who are interested - I actually did a short interview with Andy a few months back ( after the final draft - but before it hit the printers ) that I'll be putting online this weekend!

Doug
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Mariner9
post Oct 20 2008, 04:40 PM
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Completely by chance I ran across a new Europa book, "Unmasking EUROPA".

It is published by Copernicus Books, whom I had never heard of. A quick look inside the cover informs us that they are "An imprint of Springer Science-Business Media", and associated with Praxis Publishing Ltd. So, not a new player after all.


It is written by Richard Greenberg, the same author as "Europa: The Ocean Moon" I loved that book, but as previously discussed here on UMSF the author does have a political ax to grind with the scientific powers-that-be on the Galileo project. His arguments that the thick ice interpretation on Europa is flawed sound convincing, but when you are hearing only one side of a story it always does.


The new book is stripped of much of the mathematical and geologic terminology used in the original in order to reach a wider audience. I would prefer not to say it is "dumbed down", the best analogy I could think of is comparing a special issue of SCIENCE dealing with Europa, vs. the same information delivered in a long article in Scientific American.


I've only read the first few chapters. If anything this one feels even more political than the first, possibly because the author is spending more time describing the process of discovery of Europa's secrets. But I get the sense that the politics takes a mostly back seat for most of the rest of the book, and pops back up again towards the end.


Europa: The Ocean Moon was a pricey book, I think I paid $90 for it. "Unmasking EUROPA" is only $27.50, so it's a lot cheaper.
The first book had a lot more images in it, including a lot of context images and mosaics I had never seen elsewhere. If you only buy one of the two I would go with the first one. But being an outer planets junkie, I bought both without hesitation.
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Airbag
post Oct 20 2008, 05:27 PM
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Had the pleasure to browse a preview copy of Jim Bell's "Mars 3-D: A Rover's-Eye View of the Red Planet" book recently; very cool format with a fold-out front cover that has the red/blue glasses built in (so they can't get lost) and a hole for your nose :-). "Regular" images and explanatory text on the left hand pages, and the (sideways) anaglyphs (including color ones) on the right hand pages. Minor drawback might be for "older" readers that the distance from the glasses to the anaglyph page is not that far, thus perhaps forcing the use of reading glasses?

Tons of pictures and text; should be a keeper! And a good price too, e.g.:

http://www.amazon.com/Mars-3-D-Rovers-Eye-...118&sr=8-11

Airbag
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Paolo
post Oct 22 2008, 06:17 PM
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Robotic Exploration of the Solar System 2 should be out in a few days. I received my author's copies yesterday


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Oct 29 2008, 01:44 PM
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Paolo, Amazon.co.uk starts to send "" Robotic Exploration of the Solar System part 2 "" out this week (finally got an e-mail it will be delivered).
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Oct 31 2008, 02:59 PM
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IYA2009 book + DVD:
http://www.wiley-vch.de/publish/en/books/b...c1kpv9akpvkq1f2
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 2 2008, 03:00 PM
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Sir Patrick Moore combining his love for astronomy and the English game of cricket:
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 4 2008, 11:32 AM
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Paolo Ulivi's " Robotic Exploration of the Solar System - Part 2 - Hiatus and renewal 1983-1996 " is a must have!
535 pages covering Venus Orbiting Imaging Radar, Giotto, Vega, Magellan, Galileo, Ulysses, NEAR, Mars 94/96, Sojourner... to name a few missions!
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imipak
post Nov 4 2008, 08:08 PM
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(re: cricket on Mars) The swing, seam, and spin bowlers would be massacred in the thin, dry atmosphere - like a dull Sunday afternoon at Minor Counties v. Dutch Tourists - and I find a purely pace attack lacks much of the essential cat-and-mouse drama. On the other hand, if anyone can make sense of Duckworth-Lewis, it'd be JPL...


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 7 2008, 05:12 PM
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A Passion for Mars Intrepid Explorers of the red planet
Superb Hardcover edition with 279 glossy pages telling the Mars exploration story from Percival Lowell to Steve Squyres. Excellent and rare color photos (Leighton, Sagan, Murray, Soffen, Lee, Mutch, Hibbs, Malin, Theisinger, Manning, Garvin, ...).
As best 2008 book on Mars-related unmanned spaceflight = a must-have!
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imipak
post Nov 7 2008, 07:37 PM
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Thirded - I'm half-way through my copy (of "A Passion for Mars") and it does live up to the glowing reviews above. I also greatly enjoyed Doug's interview with Andrew Chaikin, which I'd been saving up until I'd read at least some of the book.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 10 2008, 05:01 PM
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Also from Jim Bell: Moon 3-D: The Lunar Surface Comes to Life
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 30 2008, 08:41 AM
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Another mars.gif Mars-related book:

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Paolo
post Dec 8 2008, 05:05 PM
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On a lighter note: "Space is a funny place" by Colin Pillinger, on 50 years of space history through comics strips and cartoons. Nice book!


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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