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Mercury Flyby 1
JRehling
post Feb 9 2008, 04:52 AM
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[...]
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volcanopele
post Feb 9 2008, 07:36 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Feb 8 2008, 03:49 PM) *
That day spent in cruise between the orbits of Europa and Io will set up a real horrorshow before Io fills the window.
Why would it be a horrorshow? Just make sure you have some good radiation protection and/or man up.

QUOTE (David @ Feb 8 2008, 08:59 PM) *
I have a very hard time imagining what it would be like on the surface of Io -- e.g., what would you be standing on if you landed? Or could you even stand up at all? I suppose a (rather sturdy) umbrella would be a good piece of apparatus to have...
Well, that all depends on where you are. A good chunk of the surface is smooth plains covered in sulfur/sulfur dioxide frost. Think Antarctica, but yellower (but sometimes white-grey). Sometimes it would look like Iceland. But overall, you could, just as long as you have good radiation protection (NEVER leave home without that) and a good spacesuit.

Just be aware of your surroundings: Don't be a plume fallout zone (imagine a light hailstorm), don't stand around in a lava lake, etc.


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Astro0
post Feb 9 2008, 11:15 AM
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Before this thread ends its days, I thought I'd share a movie with you all.
This is a scrunched down version...I'll have to find somewhere to post the larger version.
Attached File  Outbound_Mercury.wmv ( 877.11K ) Number of downloads: 813

Enjoy
Astro0
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Alan S
post Feb 9 2008, 03:56 PM
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QUOTE (Astro0 @ Feb 9 2008, 04:15 AM) *
...I'll have to find somewhere to post the larger version.
Attached File  Outbound_Mercury.wmv ( 877.11K ) Number of downloads: 813

Astro0, try www.vuze.com. The people behind the Azureus BitTorrent client run this site.
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remcook
post Feb 14 2008, 03:20 PM
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A new release:

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...mp;image_id=161

lots of evidence for lava flows. Mercury seems to come a bit more to life with these kinds of explanations.
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ustrax
post Feb 14 2008, 04:24 PM
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QUOTE (remcook @ Feb 14 2008, 03:20 PM) *
Mercury seems to come a bit more to life with these kinds of explanations.


Speaking about life... tongue.gif
What's that feature casting a shadow at the blue arrow's end? Mercury's MegaFoot?... rolleyes.gif



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ugordan
post Feb 28 2008, 03:13 PM
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An interesting oblique view of craters in the Caloris basin was released yesterday:

Craters in Caloris

It nicely brings home the fact Mercury's topography is more subdued than on the Moon, take note of the horizon in particular.


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tedstryk
post Feb 28 2008, 04:25 PM
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That is true, though not surprising, since it has a mass similar to that of Mars.


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tedstryk
post Mar 6 2008, 03:59 PM
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This is a tease! biggrin.gif

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...amp;search_cat=


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 22 2008, 12:34 AM
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Another very nice new release at the Messenger site:

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...mp;image_id=174

Fractures in Caloris. The first releases didn't show the real level of detail we would get inside Caloris. Also, the bright halo feature I noted on here earlier was described at LPSC as a probable volcanic vent, and a few others were noted. An interesting place!

Phil


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dvandorn
post Mar 22 2008, 02:56 AM
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That new image is a really interesting one, Phil. Not only are there a lot of extensional graben, there are many different flow features. The main flows in which the majority of the fresh-looking graben are cut have definite flow boundaries along the lower left of the image, trending up and to the left.

The most interesting thing to my eye are the filled-in grabens as you approach the large dark-rim-ray crater in the upper right. If you look carefully, you can see hints of a lava flow front overlaying the main, cracked flow that makes up a majority of the scene. It is above and to the right of this subtle flow front that we see a number of filled-in and "ghost" graben.

So... there must have been lava flows in Caloris *after* the uplift that formed the graben. That's *very* interesting...

-the other Doug


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volcanopele
post Mar 24 2008, 06:16 PM
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There is a new article in press in Icarus titled: "Radar imagery of the southern Caloris region, Mercury" by John K. Harmon. This paper covers RADAR mapping from Arecibo of the area on Mercury between 172 W and 228 W, and 22 S and 32 N. This area covers much of the terrain seen by MESSENGER in January. The southern part of the Caloris basin is clearly visible. In that basin, and comparing to the graphic at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...ics/Strom01.jpg , the two-ring impact crater at lower center, the "spider" crater, and the ray crater to the west of the "spider" crater are clear visible. At least two of the troughs (both trending NW-SE) are visible at the spider crater. No clear rays are visible at the ray crater in the radar map, though Harmon was right in suggesting that this was a fresher crater based on the bright halo around it. The two-ring crater has two rings, though from the text, he seemed to only consider the inner ring as a crater, though he does suggest that it is a two-ring impact basin.


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Juramike
post Mar 25 2008, 06:55 PM
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New article in space.com describes how Mercury's cliffs seem aligned N-S. This is attributed to thin mantle shell convection.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0803...ury-cliffs.html

-Mike


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edstrick
post Mar 26 2008, 09:54 AM
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During the post-Mariner analysis days, there was considerable effort to determine the latitude distribution and any preferred orientation of the scarps. Mercury was <is?> modeled as an initial ?normally? fast rotator (like Earth and Mars) that underwent tidal de-spinning till it was caught in the 3/2 resonance it's in today. The equator would have been spread out a bit and the poles sucked-in and flattened a bit. Despinning the planet should have resulted in crustal compression at the equator and stretching at the poles, with the stress at the equator being decidedly directional.

The models looked at the effects of the competition between despinning and relatively faster or slower global contraction on global stress patterns and resulting global faulting patterns. In some models, you'd see the effects balancing out at some latitudes resulting in no scarps or fractures, in other models, there's be scarps at some latitudes and graben <not seen> at others. There would also be directional orientations of the scarps at some latitudes.

As I recall, the Mariner data showed little global variation in scarp abundance or orientation within the two low-to-moderate sun-angle zones where surface relief was well imaged.

It's unclear to me whether some global variation was eventually teased out of the Mariner data or has only become apparent when much of the Mariner hi-sun-angle zone was imaged at lower sun angles and an entirely new longitude range was imaged with good illumination. Either way, there seems to be no mention of the old model work in the new analysis with mantle convection stress added to global contraction stresses in the press-release and media coverage of the new model work that I've seen.

The emergence of geophysically meaningful planetary convection modeling on computer since the Mariner analysis days has resulted in the addition numical simulation experiments like these to planetary geophysics. Impressive capabilities, indeed!
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peter59
post Mar 27 2008, 06:56 PM
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Mozart Crater and surrounding plane (1973).

Mozart Crater and surrounding plane (2008).

It's interesting how different it looks in different lightning conditions.


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