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Galileo Imagery, I couldn't find a topic not specific to one moon....
machi
post Dec 1 2009, 11:40 AM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Dec 1 2009, 12:34 PM) *
False colour? really? I've stretched the saturation to the max in Photoshop on that image, and there's no colour at all, just a slight orange tinge across the entire image.


It's slightly colored (aproximately brown color). But this is a problem with adjusting colors on different monitors. On my old CRT it looks fine, but on LCD it looks completely different.
I tested this image on LCD and it's colored (try adjusting contrast).


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Phil Stooke
post Dec 1 2009, 01:28 PM
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Since the original mosaic was monochrome, any colour is false! Looks good, though - probably fairly realistic.

Phil


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paxdan
post Dec 1 2009, 01:55 PM
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I believe machi is using false colour to mean artifical colour, not spectral imaging that uses combinations of wavelengths that do not approximate what is seen by the human eye.
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machi
post Dec 1 2009, 02:33 PM
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Full inline quote removed - ADMIN

Right. This is maybe little terminological problem. Color is entirely artificial. How Phil said, for this mosaic multispectral images don't exist.

For comparison, this is multispectral image maked from violet, green and IR images.
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djellison
post Dec 1 2009, 03:20 PM
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A more appropriate phrase would have been 'colourised' rather than 'false colour'. 'false colour' infers that you made the image from multiple filters.
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jekbradbury
post Dec 25 2009, 08:54 PM
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As Jason Perry pointed out a couple months back over at the Gish Bar Times, we have recently passed the tenth anniversary of Galileo's I24 flyby, that probe's first close-up look at Io. However, many of the images collected during the flyby had at least one of two anomalies, which the team later characterized here. They were able to create an algorithm to correct the first and simpler of the two anomalies, but were unable to correct the second anomaly. Thus, about a dozen close-in images of Io have been lost. I made an initial attempt at correcting the second anomaly for the example image used in the characterization document, but, although it makes for an interesting exercise in image processing, it's completely useless in its current form for anything resembling scientific analysis...
original:
Attached Image

attempted restoration:
Attached Image

The images themselves are here, with those containing an anomaly in the "garbled" directory and corrected versions of those with just the first anomaly in the "repaired" directory.
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tedstryk
post Dec 26 2009, 04:12 AM
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Impressive!

By the way, I don't think I ever have seen the documentation for the second anomaly. Very interesting!


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tedstryk
post Dec 28 2009, 06:59 PM
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I posted a short Europa-related blog entry yesterday.

http://planetimages.blogspot.com/2009/12/n...-of-europa.html


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ugordan
post Jan 7 2010, 11:53 AM
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Here are two rough color views from Galileo. Valhalla impact basin on Callisto:


Ganymede mosaic consisting of 4 footprints:


That's the Enki Catena crater chain at lower right. There exists a fifth footprint that I *think* fits to the lower left one, but there's no overlap to match them and I omitted it here.


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volcanopele
post Jan 21 2010, 10:59 AM
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What a difference rotating an image can make:

Attached Image


From my blog post: The mosaic above shows a portion of the northeastern margin of Chaac Patera, a volcanic depression on the anti-Jupiter hemisphere of Io. Click the image for a full-resolution version. The terrain to the upper left is the hummocky plains that make up the upper level of the depression Chaac sits in. The terrain to the lower right is the floor of Chaac Patera, consisting of overlapping, thin silicate flows. The margin itself is quite steep, with slopes approach 70 degrees on the right hand side. On the left hand side, mass wasting has produced a two-tone talus apron at the base of the slope. This mass wasting seems to be the result of more extensive slope failure (see the broken off section of massive lava on the far left edge of the image).

These images were taken during the Galileo spacecraft's February 2000 flyby of Io. The pixel scale is 7 meters per pixel.

See PIA02551 to see how these images are normally shown... Rotate the image 90 degrees and suddenly the geologist part of my brain starts saying, "Oh now this makes A LOT more sense!"


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machi
post Jan 21 2010, 01:06 PM
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Amazing! I'm not geologist, but I have seen this image many times (in raw form) and now it looks really more understandable to me. Fantastic cliff!
Let's Look at Io from a Different Angle!


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DrShank
post Jan 21 2010, 02:53 PM
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or a slightly different take, simulating the view one might have out of a porthole on passing space cruiser . . .


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DrShank
post Jan 22 2010, 01:10 PM
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QUOTE (DrShank @ Jan 21 2010, 08:53 AM) *
and a different scene . . .
this is the eroded plains shot north of the equator, for which we have no context imaging. it shows a dark smooth plataeu in the foreground
and complex plains surrounding it. these palins are probably overlapping flows and erosional debris slides of some sort.




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Explorer1
post Mar 2 2010, 03:28 AM
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On a related note, look at what made it onto Wikipedia's front page today!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callisto_%28moon%29
Rather a coincidence considering the recent blog post by Emily.....
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volcanopele
post Mar 11 2010, 10:39 PM
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I had this on my blog a few days ago, but I've gotten around to putting together a few mosaics of Europa from 1998 and 1999 by Galileo:

Attached Image
Attached Image


15ESREGMAP01
15ESREGMAP02
Description at http://www.gishbartimes.org/2010/03/two-mo...pa-mosaics.html

17ESREGMAP01
17ESAGENOR03
17ESSOUTHP01
17ESREGMAP02
Description at http://www.gishbartimes.org/2010/03/and-no...completely.html

19ESRHADAM01
Description at http://www.gishbartimes.org/2010/03/19esrh...-of-europa.html


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