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Voyager Chronology
Liss
post Dec 14 2007, 09:27 AM
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I wonder if anybody has a Voyager chronology with such details as dates of all TCMs or precise times of closest approach to different moons of Jupiter back in 1979. What I've found of pre-Saturn TCMs is here:

Voyager 1

1977.09.05 Launch
1977.09.11 TCM-1
1977.09.13 TCM-1
1977.10.29 TCM-1A
1978.06? TCM-2?
1979.01.04 Jupiter Observatory Phase
1979.01.29? TCM-3
1979.02.21 TCM-4
1979.03.05 Jupiter Flyby
1979.04.09 TCM-5
...
1980.08.22 Saturn Observatory Phase
1980.10.10-11 TCM A8
1980.11.06 TCM A9
1980.11.12 Saturn Flyby

Voyager 2

1977.08.20 Launch
1977.10.11 TCM-1
1978.05.03 TCM-2
1979.04.24 Jupiter Observatory Phase
1979.06.27 TCM?
1979.07.09 Jupiter Flyby
1979.07.09 TCM?
1979.07.23 TCM?
1980? TCM B6?
1981.02.26 TCM B7
1981.06.05 Saturn Observatory Phase
1981.07.19 TCM B8
1981.08.18 TCM B9
1981.08.26 Saturn Flyby
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 16 2007, 04:18 PM
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Now we just need, for each Voyager, entry and exit dates of the asteroid belt wink.gif
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nprev
post Dec 16 2007, 07:03 PM
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Ah...memories... biggrin.gif

On 12 Nov 1980 my high school physics teacher & I went to the now-defunct Village Inn Pizza Parlor in my home town & watched the V1 Saturn encounter feed from PBS on their big-screen projection TV. We also split, uh, a few pitchers of beer (drinking age was 18 then, so I was only a couple of months shy... rolleyes.gif )...a staggering experience in all respects!


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 17 2007, 03:10 PM
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Voyager 1 & 2 passages through Jovian system
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 17 2007, 03:15 PM
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Voyager 1 & 2 passages through Saturn system
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 17 2007, 03:17 PM
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Voyager 2 fly bys of Uranus (January 1986) and Neptune (August 1989)
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Liss
post Dec 17 2007, 07:55 PM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Dec 16 2007, 07:18 PM) *
Now we just need, for each Voyager, entry and exit dates of the asteroid belt wink.gif

It's much more easy.
Asteroid belt entry date is 1977 Dec 10 for both Voyagers at the distance of 2.0 AU from Sun. Voyager 1 exited the belt at 3.6 AU on 1978 Sep 08 and Voyager 2 followed her on 1978 Oct 21.
Really a pity nobody knows of TCMs I missed or marked uncertain, and of Jupiter and Saturn satellites TCA times.
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elakdawalla
post Dec 17 2007, 09:18 PM
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Thanks for those diagrams PhilCo! I can't tell you how many times I've searched for those on the Internet. Where did you scan them from?

--Emily


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 18 2007, 07:55 AM
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Hello Emily,
You can check the books at the lower rightside of my weblog. Most of You know "The Voyager Neptune Travel Guide", but I prefer the 'rarer' and larger sized "The Voyager Uranus Travel Guide" (See attachments). Both can still be found at book-searches on the internet (contact me off-forum).
Philip
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jgoldader
post Dec 18 2007, 08:21 PM
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It's too bad that finding info on Voyager is so difficult. The nice folks at the Voyager project at JPL have helped me a couple of times, but even they have trouble putting their hands on some things. I'd been looking for photos of the cable harnesses entering the scan platform instruments for a model I'm building, and the Voyager project couldn't locate what I was after. I imagine the closeout photos are all in boxes in the JPL archives by now! I was grateful for the effort, I know they're doing a lot with a small crew.

Oh--the Voyager Neptune Travel Guide is available through NTRS, I believe, but not the Uranus one. It's a big PDF, but beautifully written.

Also, and slightly OT, I'd love to hear from anybody who's got good info on the solid upper stages that were actually controlled by the Voyagers themselves. There's precious little on them out there on the Internet, and I haven't found anything substantial even in books about the Voyager project. You can PM me if you wish.

Jeff
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Liss
post Jan 3 2008, 01:27 PM
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I was able to found times of Jupiter flyby for Voyager 1 in UTC Earth Receive Time (some 17.7 minutes after the real event):

1979.03.05 12:42 Jupiter
1979.03.05 15:51 Io
1979.03.05 17:56 Europa
1979.03.06 02:53 Ganymede
1979.03.06 17:45 Callisto

I also have a precise spacecraft time for Io flyby, 15:13:21, and two versions of Jupiter flyby time, 12:05:26 or 12:04:36. I presume that one of this time is what was seen online and another is what was calculated post-flyby from all tracking points.
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ugordan
post Jan 3 2008, 01:33 PM
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How come only 17.7 minutes? Light time should add up to more than that.

EDIT: Ahh, probably a typo, should read 37.7 minutes instead.


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Liss
post Jan 4 2008, 03:49 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Jan 3 2008, 04:33 PM) *
How come only 17.7 minutes? Light time should add up to more than that.

EDIT: Ahh, probably a typo, should read 37.7 minutes instead.

Of course, 37.7 min. Thank you.
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dmuller
post Apr 18 2008, 09:23 AM
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I can offer the following, need to do more research to verify timezones and SCET/ERT:

The Overtaking:
19 Dec 1977 Voyager 1 overtakes Voyager 2

Voyager 1
05 Mar 1979 (06:54) Amalthea: Amalthea flyby (distant)
05 Mar 1979 (12:05) Jupiter: Jupiter Fly-By
05 Mar 1979 (15:14) Io: Io flyby
05 Mar 1979 (18:19) Europa: Europa flyby (distant)
06 Mar 1979 (02:15) Ganymede: Ganymede flyby
06 Mar 1979 (17:08) Callisto: Callisto flyby

12 Nov 1980 (05:41) Titan: Titan flyby (targetted)
12 Nov 1980 (22:17) Tethys: Tethys flyby (distant)
12 Nov 1980 (23:46) Saturn: Saturn Fly-By
13 Nov 1980 (01:43) Mimas: Mimas flyby
13 Nov 1980 (01:51) Enceladus: Enceladus flyby (distant)
13 Nov 1980 (03:39) Dione: Dione flyby (distant)
13 Nov 1980 (06:22) Rhea: Rhea flyby
13 Nov 1980 (16:45) Hyperion: Hyperion flyby (distant)

17 Feb 1998 Voyager 1 overtakes Pioneer 10 and becomes most distant spacecraft from the sun
by 2028 Reaches Heliopause
in 40,000 years Passes Star AC+79 3888 (at distance of 1.6 light-years)

Voyager 2
08 Jul 1979 (12:21) 214,930 km Callisto: Callisto flyby (distant)
09 Jul 1979 (07:14) 62,130 km Ganymede: Ganymede flyby
09 Jul 1979 (17:53) 205,720 km Europa: Europa flyby (distant)
09 Jul 1979 (20:01) 558,370 km Amalthea: Amalthea flyby (distant)
09 Jul 1979 (22:29) 721,883 km Jupiter: Jupiter
09 Jul 1979 (23:17) 1,129,900 km Io: Io flyby (distant)

25 Aug 1981 (09:24) 665,960 km Titan: Titan flyby (distant)
26 Aug 1981 (01:04) 502,250 km Dione: Dione flyby (distant)
26 Aug 1981 (02:34) 309,990 km Mimas: Mimas flyby (distant)
26 Aug 1981 (03:24) 161,081 km Saturn: Saturn
26 Aug 1981 (03:45) 87,140 km Enceladus: Enceladus flyby
26 Aug 1981 (06:12) 93,000 km Tethys: Tethys flyby
26 Aug 1981 (06:29) 645,280 km Rhea: Rhea flyby (distant)

24 Jan 1986 (17:59) 107,092 km Uranus: Uranus

14 Feb 1986 2.5 hrs trajectory correction maneuvre targets Voyager 2 towards Neptune
25 Aug 1989 39,800 km Triton: Triton
25 Aug 1989 (03:56) 29,216 km Neptune: Neptune

by 2008 Termination shock area
by 2028 Reaches Heliopause
in 296,000 years Passes Sirius (at a distance of 4.3 lightyears )


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Liss
post Jun 19 2008, 07:02 PM
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Thank you very much, dmuller.

QUOTE (Liss @ Jan 3 2008, 04:27 PM) *
I also have a precise spacecraft time for Io flyby, 15:13:21, and two versions of Jupiter flyby time, 12:05:26 or 12:04:36. I presume that one of this time is what was seen online and another is what was calculated post-flyby from all tracking points.

Things proved to be even more interesting. Both are times of closest approach, spacecraft time!
12:04:36 is UTC, but 12:05:26 is ET (ephemeris time), currently known as terrestrial time (TT). In 1979, ET was 32.184 seconds ahead of TAI and UTC was 18 seconds behind TAI.
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