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brightness of Venus
Guest_Enceladus75_*
post Nov 27 2008, 10:09 PM
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I saw a stunning view of Jupiter and Venus in the Irish sky this evening. Makes me proud to be a part of this fantastic solar system. smile.gif
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bkellysky
post Nov 29 2008, 12:24 AM
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Here's Jupiter and Venus, just after sunset on Thursday night peeking through some trees in back of my house, north of New York City. I used my Canon A40 camera on a tripod, 3x zoom, 1/2 second exposure, cropped to save uploading space.

bob
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bkellysky
post Nov 30 2008, 12:11 AM
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Jupiter with brighter Venus below it. I took this photo one hour after sunset here on the east coast of the United States.

The Moon joins the picture Sunday evening and pulls up alongside on Monday. The weather is forecast to be raining here in the NYC area Sunday evening and mostly cloudy on Monday evening, so this may be the best shot of the series for me.

This was a 10 second exposure with my Canon A40 on a tripod. The long exposure brought out the wave clouds, barely visible to the unaided eye and made the sky look bright.

bob

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bkellysky
post Dec 2 2008, 02:01 PM
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Photos of the conjunction of the Moon, Venus and Jupiter last night, making a triangle in the trees behind my house.
The two "stars" on the left and the one above are camera artifacts!
1 second exposure, canon a40 on a tripod

bob
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bkellysky
post Dec 2 2008, 02:04 PM
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A second photo from last night's conjunction - over an hour after sunset, as clouds started to move back in over us. The photo is a 10 sec exposure with my Canon A40 on a tripod, 3x zoom. The clouds show up because of the local street lights and the long exposure. While the crescent moon is overexposed, the earthshine on the moon show up nicely in this photo.

The streak of lights on the right is an aircraft that moved in during the exposure.

bob
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 17 2008, 04:43 PM
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For those UMSF members/lurkers still observing the Planet Venus and Jupiter, do go out with Your binoculars/telescope as we have 4 planets in a row this week:

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bkellysky
post Jan 16 2009, 10:04 PM
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My most recent photo of the sky with Venus is from back on January 4th, when my wife and I were visiting La Jolla, California. In the larger photo, Venus is to the upper left, with Mercury and Jupiter on the lower right. The smaller photo is a cropped version of the larger one, and you can see Jupiter to the lower left of Mercury and, if you look closely, it looks like a reflection of Jupiter in the water, [but as ugordan and andyg have pointed out, what looks like it might be a reflection is not in the right place- thanks to them for the info!] . The color of the foreground is from local street lights.

It was easier to see Jupiter and Mercury because of the flat ocean horizon on the west coast of the US.

Venus will be hanging out in the evening sky through the end of February, but Jupiter and Mercury are too near the sun to be easily seen, at least in the northern hemisphere.

bob

Canon A40 on mini-tripod on the beach at La Jolla, California, USA, 15 second exposure.
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AndyG
post Jan 17 2009, 01:25 PM
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QUOTE (bkellysky @ Jan 16 2009, 10:04 PM) *
...it looks like a reflection of Jupiter in the water.


How high above the ocean were you? "Common sense" would say, if not much, then the reflection should be lower down the image.

Regards,

Andy
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ugordan
post Jan 17 2009, 03:06 PM
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Jupiter's reflection (if any) would be vertical to the sea/horizon line, not vertical to the image.


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bkellysky
post Jan 17 2009, 03:54 PM
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Good points! It must just be a camera artifact, that just happened to be in the location where it would be, if the horizon wasn't tilted.
I'll edit the post.

all the best,
bob
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bkellysky
post Apr 18 2009, 12:38 PM
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If people don't mind my using this thread to show the visibility of Venus in the sky.....

Low in the east just before sunrise, Venus looks like an airplane headlight. BTW, there is another "headlight" well to the right of Venus, it's Jupiter. But wait, there's more.... for this week only, the Moon is putting in a guest appearance. The moon will pass by Jupiter on Sunday and Monday, and in some parts of the USA, the Moon will hide Venus early Wednesday morning.

Check out the charts from Sky and Telescope:
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/h...s/43111187.html

Attached is a view through my 8-inch dobsonian telescope (cropped to save bandwidth).

You, too, can see crescent Venus in a telescope or even through (steadily held) binoculars, but Venus is soooo bright that the crescent shape can be hard to see in the dark due to the glare. It's actually easier to see as the sky gets brighter.

The photo has some extra color due to the optics and because this is a handheld shot through the eyepiece. Canon A40 at 1/125 sec, ISO 400 and the camera zoomed at 3X.


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bkellysky
post Apr 24 2009, 11:31 AM
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Some parts of the United States got to see Venus eclipsed by the moon on Wednesday morning.
It was cloudy here in the NYC area before sunrise, but I did get to see the moon and Venus together about 8:20am EDT (two hours after sunrise) as a line of clearing skies passed by.

I used my 8x25 binoculars. I found Venus first, waiting until the clouds thinned enough to see it. Only then could I see the moon next to it, looking like a ghost. It reminded me of those space art paintings that showed a giant moon hanging in the daylight sky over some alien planet.

Those who saw this would easily see how much brighter the surface area of Venus is compared to the moon. It's even more striking after sunrise thanks to the brighter background sky. In the dark, Venus and the moon are both blindingly bright.

Some really great photos are at Spaceweather.com. My favorite is on the archived page for April 23rd. My viewing, with them in and out of the edge of a line of clouds, was too brief for a photo.

bob

ps astronomy photo of the day site today has a great photo!
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bkellysky
post Apr 24 2009, 11:44 AM
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Here's a shot of Venus through my 8-inch Dobsonian, with an eyepiece that gives 40 power. It gives some idea of what Venus looks like through a telescope.
I held the camera up to the eyepiece with the camera at 3x zoom. It's not quite centered, but it gives a feeling of seeing Venus through the eyepiece.
I took the photo about 6:30am EDT, about 25 minutes after sunrise. The camera is a Canon A40, a 1/250 second exposure at F4.8 .
I had a movie clip, but it's over 1MB, so it won't fit here.

bob
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bkellysky
post Jun 16 2010, 12:42 AM
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Venus is now a brilliant object in the western sky after sunset.
Some good photos of Venus and the Moon (including mine) are on www.spaceweather.com- check the archive for June 15th or look at the spaceweather photo secton of the website.

bob
bkellysky.wordpress.com
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bkellysky
post Jun 16 2010, 11:47 AM
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Last night, I was taking pictures of Venus, et al., after sunset, when someone asked me what the bright light next to the moon was. He said he figured I'd know, since I had the camera/tripod set up. I told him it was Venus and that some of the other dots to the upper left were a bright star, and the planets Mars and Saturn. "But you can't see those," he said and resumed walking around the track as I called after him, "Yes, you can if look when you are on the darker side of the track....." Maybe if I had the telescope and after looking though the scope, I had pointed out in the sky what we were looking at, he might have understood.
Amazing what people think they can't see, and really could if they looked for a moment.
Of course, that's when people start moving away from the crazy guy with the camera.....

Here's the Moon and Venus, cropped from a larger photo posted at bkellysky.wordpress.com....
Notice the earthshine on the Moon and the dot of light at the lower left end of the lunar crescent, separated from rest of the sunlit portion. This is likely a lunar mountain or crater wall sticking up into the sunlight, but I didn't have my binoculars to check.
Venus is an overexposed blob, but I've included it here for comparison.

bob
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