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UMSF space history photo of the month
Paolo
post May 4 2008, 10:25 AM
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Mariner 5 during ground tests (radiooccultation antenna calibration, I think)

http://i43.servimg.com/u/f43/11/13/59/33/marine10.jpg


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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dvandorn
post May 4 2008, 11:15 PM
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Does anyone recall whether or not Mariner 5 flew with the same solar wind vanes that Mariner 4 sported? I seem to recall the experiment had very minimal effect on Mariner 4, but Mariner 5 was flying into an area of increased solar wind density. Just wondering if they tried it -- especially since it's pretty obvious in the preceding image that the attach points for the vanes are certainly still there.

-the other Doug


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“The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.” -Mark Twain
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edstrick
post May 5 2008, 01:43 AM
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The vanes were light-sail vanes, they were essentially an engineering experiment.

As I understand, shiny bright metal surfaces get about 10 times the light-sail pressure as solar-wind particle pressure... (somebody correct me if I'm wrong)

My poorly documented understanding is that the vanes were ment to auto-adjust somehow the off-center solar pressure on the not-quite-symmetric spacecraft and so null out light pressure induced attitude drift, thus reducing use of attitude control gas. The vanes apparently were "sticky" and didn't adjust properly and didn't yield the expected benefit.

THEY WERE NOT CARRIED ON MARINER 5.
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post May 5 2008, 02:12 PM
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correct, see the rightside picture ontop of page 4 of this topic
the other Phil (waiting for my flight to Phoenix AZ & browsing UMSF) smile.gif
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jun 3 2008, 03:49 PM
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1971: Mariner IX to Mars
The 998 kg (launch weight) (565 kg in orbit) Mariner IX was launched to the red planet Mars on 30th May 1971 and reached the planet on 13th November 1971 becoming the first spacecraft to orbit another planet! Mariner 9’s arrival in orbit was greeted by a planet-wide duststorm, but the orbiter sat out the storm and started to map the planet. In January 1972, the first sections of the 4000 km long & 100 km wide Vallis Marineris rift valley were photographed. The ‘discovery’ of these geological features transformed our view of Mars and scientists regained a strong intrest for the red planet as it could be the place that once harboured life. Mariner 9 performed 698 revolutions during 350 Earth days of operation. After 7330 photos, the mission was over and Mariner 9’s orbit was believed to be stable for half a century, satisfying international planetary quarantine requirements…
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jul 6 2008, 11:54 AM
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Well, after Mariner IX comes Mariner X

The 503 kg Mariner 10 spacecraft, launched on 3rd November 1973, was the first to make use of an interplanetary gravitational sling-shot maneuver, using the planet Venus to bend its flight path and bring its perihelion (point closest to the Sun) down to the first rock from the Sun, planet Mercury's orbit. Venus flyby occurred in February 1974 and Mariner 10 flew by Mercury in March + September 1974 and later in March 1975…
Mariner 10 completed one of the most successful planetary explorations: 4 encounters in 13 months!

The other Philip
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Paolo
post Jul 6 2008, 12:00 PM
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That picture in very high resolution, plus others of Mariner 10 can be found here:
http://images.ksc.nasa.gov/photos/1973/cap...C-73P-0539.html
http://images.ksc.nasa.gov/photos/1973/cap...C-73P-0541.html
http://images.ksc.nasa.gov/photos/1973/cap...C-73P-0542.html


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Paolo
post Jul 6 2008, 03:16 PM
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From a contemporary magazine, I have scanned and put on my website http://utenti.lycos.it/paoloulivi/pioneer1.html a sequence of images of the launch of Pioneer 1 in 1958


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Aug 1 2008, 06:05 AM
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Well, after last month's failure to come up with a 'rare' photograph, I had to do better on Mariner 10: Here's an artist impression of the September 1974 Mercury flyby smile.gif

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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Aug 26 2008, 05:35 PM
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As a follow-on of the Mariner series, Pioneer F/G were built...
The 260 kg spin-stabilised Pioneer 10 spacecraft established a historic triumph of science and engineering by setting unprecedented flight records. Pioneer 10 not only became the first spacecraft to pass beyond the orbit of Mars, cross the asteroid belt and travel to Jupiter but also became the first spacecraft to leave the solar system and head into interstellar space.

See the Pioneer topics for more info smile.gif


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Sep 8 2008, 10:24 AM
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As I already posted the Pioneer 10 photo for September 08, I wanted this time to point out an interesting Blog entry of a guy who found an old NASA-JPL trailer on a dusty lot of grand between Los Angeles & Las Vegas: great " retro space-tech " photos!

http://thisisharrington.com/projects/nasa/index.html
cool.gif
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djellison
post Sep 8 2008, 11:31 AM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Sep 8 2008, 11:24 AM) *
an old NASA-JPL trailer on a dusty lot


Untrue
http://www.nasawatch.com/archives/2008/08/...yone_missi.html

Specifically
"This story is completely misleading. I have been in this trailer myself. It is on the grounds of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, operated by the California Institute of Technology. It is used to control a small radio antenna nearby, and is NOT abandoned."
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jamescanvin
post Sep 8 2008, 12:02 PM
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Indeed. And as for "retro space-tech" it looks a lot more modern than many bits of radio telescope hardware I've seen, much of it still in use!


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Sep 8 2008, 05:17 PM
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O.K. guys... this means I gave to come up with some real " Retro " Space Technology huh.gif
What about this IBM 7090 as used by NASA Ames Research and NASA-JPL in the 1960s:

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lyford
post Sep 8 2008, 09:28 PM
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That is so.... beautiful! *sniff* *sniff* I must have something in my eye.... biggrin.gif


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Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
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