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PIONEER chronology
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Jan 4 2008, 05:35 PM
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Just thought I would start a similar topic as the 'VOYAGER chronology' ... of course with nice diagrams wink.gif
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 9 2008, 04:59 PM
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Hundred days without reply in this interesting topic, so I'll post an add-on:
Pioneer 11 encounter with planet Saturn
It was an important decision by NASA-Ames Research to perform a low-risk flyby of Saturn outside Saturn's rings wink.gif

the other Phil
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dmuller
post Apr 18 2008, 05:05 AM
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I can offer the following chronology ... not mind-boggling, but at least something (apologies for the layout):

Pioneer 10
03 Mar 1972 (01:49) Launch
15 Jul 1972 Enters Asteroid Belt
03 Dec 1973 200,000 km Jupiter Fly-By
31 Mar 1997 End of science mission
27 Apr 2002 Last telemetry data received
23 Jan 2003 Last signal received
04 Mar 2006 Last attempt to acquire signal fails
in 126,000 years No longer dominated by gravitational force of sun
in 2 million years Aldebean Fly-By

Pioneer 11
06 Apr 1973 (02:11) Launch
02 Dec 1974 34,000 km Jupiter Fly-By
01 Sep 1979 21,000 km Saturn Fly-By
30 Sep 1995 End of science mission
30 Nov 1995 Last signal received
in 4 million years Lambda Aquilla Fly-By


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Toma B
post Apr 18 2008, 03:27 PM
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QUOTE (dmuller @ Apr 18 2008, 07:05 AM) *
in 2 million years Aldebean Fly-By


I was just about to ask will it be a close flyby then I remembered that it does not carry a camera....so I guess no nice images.... biggrin.gif


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My "Astrophotos" gallery on flickr...
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ElkGroveDan
post Apr 18 2008, 03:55 PM
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Pioneer 10 does have a camera.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 18 2008, 05:03 PM
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Indeed it was crucial to have a camera onboard, in fact a special instrument better known as " Imaging Photo-polarimeter "
It measured the faint glows in interplanetary space of the zodiacal light, the Gegenschein and it scanned the planets and moons...

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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 18 2008, 05:44 PM
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The incredible Saturn flyby by Pioneer 11 in September 1979, next year 30 years ago!

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nprev
post Apr 19 2008, 01:00 AM
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What a year 1979 was...V1 @ Jupiter in March, V2 there in July, and Pioneer @ Saturn in September. (On a personal note, I also got to see a total solar eclipse in February). I'll bet a lot of people got hooked on space that year.


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ElkGroveDan
post Apr 19 2008, 01:26 AM
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I bought my first car in 1979.


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djellison
post Apr 19 2008, 08:07 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Apr 19 2008, 02:00 AM) *
What a year 1979 was


Yup - I started it 8 days old smile.gif
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nprev
post Apr 19 2008, 02:08 PM
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<grumble>...bloody young whippersnapper...</grumble>

<gloat>...nyah, nyah, Doug, me & EGD got to watch VL1, VL2, V1, V2, & P11 "live"!!! </gloat>... tongue.gif smile.gif


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tedstryk
post Apr 19 2008, 02:19 PM
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The most important day of that year was the 24th of January. Far eclipsed the Voyager and Pioneer missions. biggrin.gif


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SFJCody
post Apr 19 2008, 03:13 PM
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I've just realized that New Horizons passing beyond the orbit of Saturn will be the first time in my life that a spacecraft has traversed this distance. In 1982 the Voyager encounters with Saturn were long past.
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tedstryk
post Apr 19 2008, 03:28 PM
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One exciting thing to think about. Pioneer flew by Saturn just before the 1979-1980 ring plane crossing. 28 years later, the 2009 ring plane crossing is identical. Voyager 1 flew by soon after in 1980, and Voyager 2 flew by in 1981, with the rings appearing much brighter because of the wider illumination angle. In a sense, that period was almost like having an orbiter make three gigantic orbits. The fact that Cassini will follow the exact same seasonal sequence over the next three or four years should make for some very interesting comparisons.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 19 2008, 04:59 PM
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That's an astronomer speaking smile.gif ( Saturn's rings appear much narrower in 2008 & 2009 )
However for Pioneer 11's passage of Saturn, NASA had 2 options. They've chosen the safer trajectory.
Those interested in the complete background story of selecting Pioneer 11's flyby option of Saturn, can turn to:
Quest - The History of Spaceflight Quarterly ( Volume 7 number 4 - Spring 2000 )
Pathfinding the Rings: The Pioneer Saturn Trajectory Decision ( By Mark Wolverton )


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